The Russian Crimean War Medal.

Tsar Alexander II succeeded to the throne upon his father Nicholas’s death on February 18 (March 2) 1855, but due to the war a ceremonial coronation in Moscow was not held until the summer of 1856. The was the occasion for a number of magnanimous decrees, including the institution on 26 August of a medal commemorating the late war, usually referred to as the bronze medal in memory of the war of 1853-1856 [bronzovaya medal' v pamyat' voiny 1853-1856 gg.]. The text of the manifesto translated below is taken from its publication in the official army gazette Russkii Invalid, 29 August 1856, No. 190, and that for the War Ministry regulations from 2 September 1856, No. 192.

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Highest Manifesto.
We, Alexander the Second,
by the grace of God
Emperor and Autocrat
of all the Russias, Tsar of Poland,
etc., etc., etc.,
Announce to all Our faithful subjects.

On this great day, having asked for the All-Highest’s blessing, We placed upon Ourselves the crown of Our Forebears, and Our first thoughts, as always, were of the welfare of Our beloved Russia. While repeating during the Sacred Coronation rite the prayer We voiced in the very hour We ascended to the Throne of Our Ancestors, the prayer to continuously have as the one object of Our labors and cares the maintenance and improvement of this welfare, now and in the time to come, We could not, along with this, fail to bring to mind the events of the recent past years, marked by difficult trials but also by examples of the highest glory and new proof of the boundless and sincere devotion to the Throne and Fatherland of Our faithful subjects of all classes, examples on which Our Father, never to be forgotten, saw as happiness sent down to Him as the Work of Heaven. These memories are preserved forever in Our heart and of course will be passed on to Our utmost descendents. But We desire, during the present ceremony, to once again universally manifest the feelings inspired by them by instituting certain special marks of distinction and special expressions of Our good will and recognition of each of the State’s social classes.

The heroic defenders of Sevastopol were decorated with medals suspended from the ribbon of the Order of St. George the Bearer of Victory, medals established by Our will to mark the eleven-month siege that still astounds the world, a siege of fortifications which were thrown up almost in mere moments by the defenders themselves. Now We establish bronze medals of similar style, on one side of which are depicted the intertwined monograms of Ourselves and Our Father who rests in God, under the All-Seeing Eye of Providence, and on the other—His memorable words: “Na Tya, Gospodi, upovakhom, da ne postydimsya vo veki.” [Praise to Thee, Lord, that we may stand proud forever.”] These medals, also on the ribbon of the Order of Saint George, We designate for soldiers who took part in the glorious battles and general military operations of 1853, 1854, and 1855 in Asiatic Turkey as well as on Our side of the Empire’s borders there, in the repulse of enemy forces from Petropavlovsk, and in the action at Sinope which destroyed the greater part of the Turkish fleet. These same medals, on the ribbon of the Order of the Apostle Saint Andrew the First-Called, are to be received by all ranks of the land and sea forces, and also the National Mobile Mass Levy [Opolchenie] and the Little Russian horse cossack regiments, which in other parts of the Realm repulsed enemy attacks, or while in regions declared to be under martial law or on the march to such regions were prepared to act as a strong wall against those who would break into the Russian hinterland. Doctors and civilian officials in general who were with forces that took part in military operations or who served in regions declared under martial law are to receive medals suspended from the Order of Saint George if they were part of the forces for which the medal on that ribbon is prescribed, or if they were present at the actions for which it was designated; other doctors and officials are to have the medal on the Order of Saint Andrew the First-Called. All others who were on active military service during the late war, or in civil service—but in that case in officer grades, or in the National Mass Levy or in the Little Russian horse cossack regiments, will be awarded the same medals on the ribbon of the Order of the Apostolic Saint Grand Duke Vladimir.

The same image and inscription is placed in the middle of the pectoral crosses which We are instituting for the entire Clergy from the Supreme Pastors of the Church down to Priests. Worn on the ribbon of the Order of the Apostolic Saint Prince Vladimir, they testify and remind to each and all that Our Clergy in this most recent time of trials showed themselves to be worthy of their priestly office, worthy of their immortal predecessors who so many times helped save the Realm, worthy by their zeal in tirelessly invoking God’s strength to the Throne through supplications and eloquent inspirational sermons, and by their own glorious deeds. Along with the pectoral crosses, the medals on the ribbon of the Order of Saint George, as established for certain of Our military units, will be received by those priests who were on campaign with their regiments and commands and who on the battlefield itself with tender concern and selflessness succored those who were bearing the great evils that befell the motherland, strengthening them in their suffering through instruction in faith, or accompanying them with prayer on the journey from the deathbed to eternal life. Other participants in military operations, or those who were part of forces brought to a wartime footing or deployed in places declared under martial law, are prescribed, in addition to pectoral crosses, medals on the ribbon of the Order of Saint Andrew the First-Called. Clergy and churchmen who by their position cannot receive pectoral crosses but who were in battles or other military operations will be decorated with the medals established for the troops, on the ribbon of either the Order of Saint George or of Saint Andrew the First-Called.

From these honored servants of the Altar We turn to Our loyal Russian Nobility. They have long been accustomed to being the model for other classes, preceding them in response to the call of honor and sacrifice for the Fatherland, and We know how great these sacrifices were during the course of the late war. Appreciating them in full, We grant, not as an award, but only in commemoration of them, a bronze medal to every noble family, in the person of its head. These medals have the same image and inscription as We established for the medals prescribed for Our forces. These will be worn in a buttonhole on the ribbon of the Order of Saint Vladimir, and upon the death of its recipient, it will be kept in his lineage, always passed on to the eldest of the family.

The same exact medal, to be worn on the ribbon of the Order of Saint Anne, is prescribed for those Honorary Citizens and distinguished merchants who were superlative in contributing to the cost of the war, or in aid to the wounded and the families of the dead. This class and all those who belong to the classes of town and country dwellers, from the richest traders and manufacturers to simple farmers and foreign colonists settled in Russia, were second to none in demonstrating their zeal, in their readiness to sacrifice all, even their lives, for Us and the Fatherland. We thank them and all Our loyal subjects in the name of this Fatherland, equally beloved by them and Us. Let All-Bountiful God shower his blessings on this land, and with the help of this blessing, We will have the happiness of soon wiping away the damage caused by the calamity of war, both the difficult burdens placed upon the Government’s strength, and those personal strains inflicted upon several parts of Russia. [There then follows an extensive listing of various relief measures: aid to regions affected by the war, conscription postponements, tax relief, suspension of fines, commutation of prison sentences, amnesty to political prisoners and exiles, etc. These do not concern the medal, and so are omitted. – M.C.]

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ORDER OF THE MINISTER OF WAR
Moscow, 26 August 1856.
No. 185.

In an All-Merciful Manifesto given this day on the occasion of the Sacred Coronation of THEIRIMPERIALMAJESTIES, the SOVEREIGNEMPERORwas among other things pleased to established bronze medals [medali] and bronze pectoral crosses [napersnye kresty] in commemoration of the recent war.

Regulations for the distribution of these insignia have been confirmed by HIGHESTAuthority and are herewith appended for appropriate implementation by the Military administration.

Signed: General-of-Artillery Sukhazanet 2nd.

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Signed on the original:Confirmed by HIGHEST Authority.”

26 August 1856.
Minister of War, General-of-Artillery Sukhozanet 2nd.

REGULATIONS
For the distribution of bronze medals and bronze pectoral crosses
in commemoration of the recent war of 1853-1856.

INTRODUCTION.

1. In memory of the recent war of years 1853, 1854, 1855, and 1856 there are instituted: for Military and Civil officers and officials of all departments, for the nobility, and for the merchant class—a bronze medal, and for the clergy—a bronze pectoral cross, according to the design confirmed by HIGHESTAuthority.

2. On the basis of the rules set forth below, the medal is issued on St.-George, St.-Andrew, St.-Vladimir, and St.-Anne ribbons, and the pectoral cross on St.-Vladimir ribbon.

3. Following the example of the bronze medal and bronze pectoral cross established in memory of the year of 1812, the current medal is also worn on the chest and the pectoral cross around the neck.

ABOUT THE MEDAL.

4. The medal on St.-George ribbon is designated for troops of the Separate Caucasus Corps who were across the border in Asiatic Turkey or took part in actions against the Turks within the borders of the Empire.

5. This same medal, i.e. on a St.-George ribbon, is designated for naval personnel who took part in the Battle of Sinope, and to all personnel of any branch who were at the repulse of the enemy in Kamchatka at the port of Petropavlovsk.

6. The medal on St.-Andrew ribbon is designated for Army and Navy personnel, and persons of other departments, who do not receive it on St.-George ribbon yet belonged to military units which: were placed on a wartime footing, took part in military operations, or were located in places considered under martial law or a state of siege.

7. This same medal, i.e. on a St.-Andrew ribbon, is designated for personnel of the National Mobile Mass Levy [Gosudarstvennoe Podvizhnoe Opolchenie] who engaged in military actions with the enemy or were part of forces placed on a wartime footing or sent out on campaign.

Note: This also applies to Little-Russian Horse Cossack regiments.

8 The medal on St.-Vladimir ribbon is designated for Military and Civil personnel of all branches and departments who did not receive medals on St.-George or St.-Andrew ribbon, and also for personnel of the Mass Levy and Little-Russian Horse Cossack No. 4 Regiment [Malorossiiskii Konnyi Kazachii No 4-go polk] who did not set out on campaign from the place they were formed.

9. This same medal, i.e. on a St.-Vladimir ribbon, is also prescribed for the nobility.

10. The medal on St.-Anne ribbon is designated for members of the merchant class.

ABOUT THE PECTORAL CROSS.

11. All members of the clergy, in military as well as other departments, from Metropolitans down to Priests, are to receive a pectoral cross on a St.-Vladimir ribbon.

12. Clergy belonging to military and Naval units that receive the medal on St.-George ribbon are to be given, in addition to the above pectoral cross on St.-Vladimir ribbon, the medal on St.-George ribbon.

13. Clergy of all departments who do not receive medals on St.-George ribbon but who took part in military actions against the enemy, belonged to military units that were placed on a wartime footing, or who were in places considered under martial law or a state of siege, are entitled to medals on St.-Andrew ribbon in addition to the above pectoral cross.

14. All remaining clergy in military as well as other branches and departments, from Metropolitans to Priests, are to receive only the pectoral cross; they are not to receive medals.

15. Deacons and sextons [d’yakony i tserkovnosluzhiteli] of all departments receive medals on St.-George or St.-Andrew ribbon only if they took part in military actions against the enemy.

16. Deacons and sextons (unless they are lower-rank military personnel) who did not take part in actions against the enemy do not receive medals.

Note: Medals issued to all personnel of Military and Naval branches and to Clergy that are on St.-George or St.-Andrew ribbon are to be light bronze [bronzovyya svetlyya], while medals for personnel of Civil departments, as well as all pectoral crosses for Clergy in all departments, are to be dark bronze [bronzovye temnye].

CONCERNING PERSONNEL HAVING THE RIGHT TO RECEIVE MEDALS.

17. The personnel in Army and Navy branches who are to receive medals are: all Generals; Field and Company-Grade Officers; all persons holding officer rank in the National Mobile Mass Levy and all other departments, such as those for Mines, Ways of Communication, Forestry, Survey, Quarantine and Border Guards; and persons such as Chiefs of Police and Town Commandants (who hold military rank), and so on.

18. All the listed persons are to receive medals on St.-George, St.-Andrew, or St.-Vladimir ribbon. On St.-George ribbon if they were in the forces of the Separate Caucasus Corps over the border in Asiatic Turkey or took part in actions with the enemy for which this medal is designated. On St.-Andrew ribbon if they took part in military operations, were part of forces brought to a wartime footing, or were in places considered under martial law or a state of siege.

19. Lower military ranks of the mentioned departments and branches, be they combatants or non-combatants of any rank, and likewise Asiatics and militiamen, receive medals on the same basis on St.-George, St.-Andrew, or St.-Vladimir ribbon.

20. From the nobility of each province [guberniya], the father or elder of each family receives a medal on St.-Vladimir ribbon.

21. Medals likewise on St.-Vladimir ribbon are to be issued to civil officials of all departments who were in service in officer-equivalent ranks during the recent war.

22. Doctors and in general all civilian officials who were with units that took part in military actions, or who served in places considered under martial law or a state of siege, are to be given a medal on St.-George or St.-Andrew ribbon: on St.-George ribbon if they were in units, or took part in actions, for which this medal is designated; otherwise, on St.-Andrew ribbon.

23. Medals on St.-Anne ribbon are to be received by those members of the merchant class who rendered outstanding and significant services.

ON PROCEDURES FOR ISSUING MEDALS AND PECTORAL CROSSES.

24. Medals are to be given to:

a.) Personnel entitled through service in Military, Naval, Civil, or other departments—through arrangements by their Commanders.

b.) Nobility—through Provincial Representatives of the Nobility, for each province.

c.) Merchants—after examination in the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the service rendered by each person.

25. Pectoral crosses and medals for clergy—through arrangements by the Most Holy Government Sinod.

GENERAL RULES.

26. The medal and pectoral cross are to be given only to those persons whose service or status entitling their right to receive them occurred in the time period from 14 June 1853 through 19 March 1856.

27. Those whose service or status give them the right to medals on different ribbons are to receive only one medal, on the higher-ranking ribbon.

28. The ranking of ribbons is reckoned in the following order: the most senior is the St. George, after it St. Andrew, then St. Vladimir, and finally St. Anne.

REGARDING PERSONS NOT ENTITLED TO THE MEDAL.

29. Medals are not to be given to:

a.) Persons who received criminal sentences and who have not received pardons.

b.) Persons under arrest or investigation who have not yet been found completely innocent.

c.) Any person who by 19 March 1856 had not reached the age when service becomes counted as effective.

Note: This rule does not apply to Naval Corps cadets onboard vessels; they are to receive medals regardless of age.

30. The medal herewith instituted is to be kept by the recipient’s descendents, but without the right to wear it.

Signed: Minister of War,

General-of-Artillery Sukhozanet 2nd.

* * * * * * * *

Russkii Invalid, No. 279, 21 December 1856, page 1190, reprinted from Senatskiya Vedomosti the following:

The SOVEREIGNEMPEROR, in response to a report by the chief of the Postal Department, on 6 November of this year was pleased to order by HIGHEST AUTHORITY: issue the dark-bronze medal commemorating the recent war of 1853-1856 to Station Supervisors [Statsionnye Smotriteli], Supervisors of postal carriages [Smotriteli pochtovykh ekipazhei], postriders [pochtaliony], and other low-level postal workers, but only in those provinces which were in a state of siege or under martial law, on a St.-Andrew ribbon for the first ones and on a St.-Vladimir ribbon for the latter.

* * * * * * * *

In his Nagrady; Entsiklopedicheskii Putevoditel' po Istorii Rossiiskikh Nagrad (Moscow, 1998), Aleksandr Kuznetsov lists the following variants of this medal that he has encountered:

Light bronze, 28mm, on George, Anne, and Andrew ribbons.

Light bronze, privately struck, 28mm, on George, Anne, and Andrew ribbons.

Brass variant, (no size indicated), on George, Anne, and Andrew ribbons.

Miniature, privately struck, gold or bronze, 8 to 18mm, on George, Anne, and Andrew ribbons.

Dark bronze, 28mm, on Anne and Vladimir ribbons.

Pectoral cross, 100 by 58mm, dark bronze, on Vladimir ribbon.

Pectoral cross, 100 by 58mm, gold, on George ribbon.

The colors of the various ribbons are:

St. George - Orange with three black stripes.

St. Andrew- Light blue.

St. Vladimir - Black/red/black.

St. Anne - Red with thin gold edges.

I have found a single printed source that details awards of this medal. It is a volume from the series Stoletie Voennago Ministerstvo 1802-1902 [War Ministry Centennial 1802-1902], comprising several hundred abstracted service records of civilian and military personnel who at one time or another were assigned to central offices of the War Ministry. The service records indicate the award of the 1853-56 medal for most of those who held it, but some obvious candidates do not have their award mentioned. The most usual citation is simply “bronze medal in memory of the war of 1853-1856.” Sometimes the medal is specified as dark or light bronze, and even less often the type of ribbon is indicated. I have selected examples that would be of the most interest for this article and listed them below. These selections are not statistically representative, but are mainly chosen because they provide the most detail. By far the most common ribbon mentioned is the St. Andrew, but there are a few of St. Vladimir, and no St. George or St. Anne example was found. Ranks and positions indicated are as held during the war itself. The order of the listings are: a) no ribbon mentioned, b) St. Andrew ribbon, and c) St. Vladimir ribbon. Within each of these groups the order is bronze, light-bronze, and lastly dark-bronze.

a) No ribbon mentioned.

A. P. Petrov, official in the Commissariat Department, St. Petersburg - bronze medal.

P. I. Vasil'ev, official in the Artillery Department, St. Petersburg - bronze medal.

P. I. Chemesov, ensign in Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich’s Jager Regiment (the Kazan Regiment), active service on the Danube, wounded at the Alma, transferred to duty at the War Ministry in St. Petersburg - bronze medal (also had silver medal on St.-George ribbon for the defense of Sevastopol).

I.T. Timofeev, civil official on the Military Censorship Committee - bronze medal.

I. S. Kruglyi, civil official in the Provisions Department, St. Petersburg - bronze medal.

A. Ye. Bers, doctor in the War Ministry chancellery, St. Petersburg - bronze medal.

I. I. Kovalevskii, ensign, Suzdal Infantry Regiment, wounded at the Alma - bronze medal (also held silver medal for the defense of Sevastopol).

K. Ye. Gundius, lieutenant, 16th Artillery Brigade, at the Alma, Inkerman, and River Chernaya - bronze medal (also held silver medal for the defense of Sevastopol).

K. P. von Kaufman, general in the Caucasus theater, at the siege of Kars - bronze medal.

V. Ye. Posun'ko, private, company of serving invalids, 7th Region of New Russia Millitary Settlements - light-bronze medal.

M. M. Briskorn, member of the Military Council, chief of the War Ministry chancellery - light-bronze medal.

N. N. Annenkov, army general, governor-general of Bessarabia and New Russia, helped repulse allied fleet at Odessa - light-bronze medal (also held silver medal for the defense of Sevastopol).

A. M. Saltykov, hussar officer, staff of 7th Light Cavalry Division - light-bronze medal.

N. I. Poltoranov, civil official in Military Justice section of the War Ministry, light-bronze medal.

L. S. Karmaleev, commissariat official in St. Petersburg - light-bronze medal.

L. P. Kadyshevtsov, civil official in field commissariat commision in the Danube theater - light-bronze medal.

N. R. Shchiglev, civil official, Department of Foreign Trade - dark-bronze medal.

M. D. Lokhvitskii, civil official, Vladimir Province - dark-bronze medal.

b) St.-Andrew ribbon

N. I. Mosolov, major, Mobile Mass Levy [Opolchenie] of Vyatka Province - medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

A. P. Dokhturov, ensign, King Frederick-William’s Grenadier Regiment - medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

A. D. Gushchin, mid-level commissariat official in Kiev - bronze medal on St. Andrew ribbon.

N. Ye. Piktorov, civil official involved in codification of military statutes, St. Petersburg - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

A. G. Rotchev, civil official in the War Ministry, St. Petersburg, author of “The Truth About England” - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

V. R. Ratko, civil official on staff of the Southern Army - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

M. D. Novikov, naval officer, wounded in Sevastopol - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon (also held silver medal for the defense of Sevastopol).

N. N. Teterevnikov, civil official, St.-Petersburg Commissariat Commission - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

N. U. Mikheev, army clerk, St. Petersburg - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

Baron G. L. Raden, civil official, Department of Military Settlements, St. Petersburg - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

R. I. Zhuravskii, commissariat official, Crimean army - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon (also held silver medal for the defense of Sevastopol).

V. A. Pashkov, officer in the Chevalier Guards, on His Imperial Majesty’s staff - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

D. S. Mordvinov, artillery officer, Active Army, Poland - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

V. F. Vorob'ev, clerk, Riga Internal Garrison Battalion - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

M. A. Petrov, clerk at the headquarters of the Separate Corps of the Internal Guard, St. Petersburg - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

T. Ya. Seroguzov, army clerk, Department of Military Settlements, St. Petersburg - bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

K. Z. Moiseev, civil official, army hospitals in the Danube theater - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon

P. P. Ivanov, civil official in the Provisions Department, St. Petersburg, light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

G. V. Aleksandrov, private in Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich’s Dragoon Regiment (Kinburn Dragoons) - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

V. V. Levenets, cornet, Bashkir No. 2 Regiment - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

D. A. Stalypin, hussar officer, adjutant on staff of 3rd Infantry Corps, contused by cannonball at River Chernaya - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon (also held silver medal on St.-George ribbon for the defense of Sevastopol).

V. I. Yukavskii, commander of No. 32 Druzhina of the Smolensk Mass Levy - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

Ye. I. Punyaev, civil official in War Ministry chancellery, St. Petersburg - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

I. G. Rutkovskii, civil official in the War Ministry chancellery, St. Petersburg - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

Ye. N. Demidov, officer, Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment, on staff of commander-in-chief of Guards and Grenadier Corps - light-bronze medal on St.-Vladimir ribbon.

G. F. Bogaevskii, artillery officer in the War Ministry, St. Petersburg - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

M. I. Tsitovich, civil official, War Ministry, St. Petersburg - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

I. M. Leks, officer in Life-Guards Lancers, adjutant on staff of Guards Infantry Corps - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

G. Ya. Sosov, clerk, St.-Petersburg fortress artillery - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

I. S. Novakov, civil official, Provisions Department, St. Petersburg - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

A. K. Paskhal'skii, civil official, intendance section of 3rd, 4th and 5th Corps - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon (also held silver medal for the defense of Sevastopol).

V. I. Vasil'chikov, army general, served in the Danube theator, chief-of-staff of the Sevastopol garrison - light-bronze medal (also held silver medal for the defense of Sevastopol).

V. F. Bulgarin, civil official in Novgorod Provisions Commission, on detached duty in the War Ministry, St. Petersburg - light-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

P. A. Veretennikov, civil official in the War Ministry, St. Petersburg - dark-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

N. A. Korkin, civil official, St.-Petersburg local administration, then State Commission for the Clearing of Debts - dark-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

K. Ye. Afanas'ev, civil official, St. Petersburg local administration - dark-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

A. L. Pestrzhetskii, civil official, Poltava Province - dark-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon

V. A. Trubacheev, non-commissioned officer, replacement squadron of His Majesty the King of Wurttemberg’s Hussar Regiment - dark-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

F. F. Gaaze, civil official, chancellery of Chief of Routes of Communications and Public Buildings, St. Petersburg - dark-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

A. I. Maksimovich, civil official, chancellery of the Ruling Senate, St. Petersburg - dark-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

M. S. Neklyudov, civil official for special matters, attached first to the Caucasus viceroy and then to the governor-general of Finland - dark-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

P. S. Maslennikov, civil official, St.-Petersburg Civil Court - dark-bronze medal on St.-Andrew ribbon.

c) St.-Vladimir ribbon.

D. A. Matsulevich, civil official, Moscow Province - dark-bronze medal on St.-Vladimir ribbon.

Ya. N. Bogdanov, civil official in chancellery of the viceroy of the Caucasus - dark-bronze medal on St.-Vladimir ribbon.

Ye. A. Berezovskii, civil official, Tambov Province - dark-bronze medal on St.-Vladimir ribbon.

P. S. Suntsov, doctor, Yarinsk and Nolinsk districts (central Russia) - dark-bronze medal on St.-Vladimir ribbon.

Source: Stoletie Voennago Ministerstvo 1802-1902. Chast' III, Otd. 5. Ukazatel' biograficheskikh svedenii, arkhivnykh i literaturnykh materialov, kasayushchikhsya chinov obshchago sostava po Kantselyarii Voennago Ministerstva s 1802 do 1902 g. vklyuchitel'no (St. Petersburg, 1909); series editor General of Cavalry D. A. Skalon, this volume compiled by Lt Col N. M. Zatvornitskii.

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Translations by Mark Conrad, 2001 and 2006.