HISTORICAL DESCRIPTION

OF THE CLOTHING AND

ARMS OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY

A.V. VISKOVATOV

Compiled by Highest direction

Saint Petersburg, Military Typography Office, 1841

[TRANSLATED BY MARK CONRAD, 2007]

VOLUME 8

Army Cavalry, Artillery, Engineers, and Garrisons

1796-1801

 *     *     *     *     *     *

 

Contents

Changes in the uniforms and equipment of Army Cavalry, Artillery, Engineers, and Garrisons, from 1796 to 1801

IV.    Cuirassier regiments
V.     Dragoon regiments
VI.    Hussar regiments
VII.   Artillery
VIII.  Corps of Engineers
IX.    Garrisons



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

1017 and 1018. Private and Officer. HIS MAJESTY’S Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1801.

1019. Privates. HER MAJESTY’S Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1801.

1020. Officer and Private. HER MAJESTY’S Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1801.

1021. Cuirassiers. HER MAJESTY’S Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1801. (In smocks [V kitelyakh].)

1022. Cuirassier weapons and accouterments, 1796-1801. a. Cuirass; b. Girdle; c. Sword belt with broadsword and sabertache; d. Sword knot; e. Carbine; f. Shoulder belt; g. Cartridge pouch; and h. Pistol.

1023. Officer and Non-commissioned Officer. Military Order Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1801.

1024. Distinguished Officer Candidate [Estandart-Yunker] of the Yekaterinoslav Cuirassier Regiment, and Trumpeter of the Kazan Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1801.

1025. Staff-Trumpeters. Ryazan and Yamburg Cuirassier Regiments, 1797-1800, and Glukhov Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1801.

1026. Kettledrummers. Kiev (1797-1801) and Nezhin (1797-1800) Cuirassier Regiments.

1027. Officers. Sofiya Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1800, and Starodub Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1801.

1028. Officer, Riga Cuirassier Regiment, and Non-commissioned Officer, Chernigov Cuirassier Regiment, 1797-1801.

1029. Cuirass and Broadsword for Cuirassier Officers, 1797-1801.

1030. Generals. Kharkov and Little-Russia Cuirassier Regiments, 1797-1801. (In undress coats [vitse-mundiry].)

1031. Stable Master. Cuirassier regiment, 1797-1800.

1032. Privates. Neplyuev’s and Friderici’s Cuirassier Regiments (1798-1800), and Zorn’s Cuirassier Regiment (1798-1801).

1033. Star for sabertaches, shabracks, and pistol holders of the HER MAJESTY’S Leib-Cuirassier Regiment, awarded 8 October 1798.

1034. Private and Officer. Vladimir Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1801.

1035. Musket and Broadsword for Dragoon Regiments, 1797-1801.

1036. Officer and Non-commissioned Officer. AstrakhanDragoon Regiment, 1797-1800.

1037. Dinstinguished Officer Candidate [Fanen-Yunker]. Nizhnii-Novgorod Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1800.

1038. Drummer. Pskov Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1801.

1039. Trumpeter, Smolensk Dragoon Regiment, and Officer, St.-Petersburg Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1801.

1040. Staff-Trumpeter. Taganrog Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1800.

1041. Officer and Hautboy Players. Irkutsk Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1800.

1042. Kettledrummers. Siberia, Orenburg, and Ingermanland Dragoon Regiments, 1797-1801.

1043. Officers. Narva and Rostov Dragoon Regiments, 1797-1800.

1044. Officer. Moscow Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1800.

1045. General, Kargopol Dragoon Regiment, and Officer, Seversk Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1801.

1046. Non-commissioned Officer, Schreiders’ Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1801, and Private, Khastatov’s Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1800.

1047. Private and Officer. Pavlograd Hussar Regiment, 1797-1798.

1048. Hussar headdress, 1797-1801.

1049. Barrel-sash, Sword Belt with Saber and Sabertache, and Carbine. Pistol, Shabrack, and Cartridge Pouch. Hussar Regiments, 1797-1801.

1050. Non-commissioned Officer. Sumy Hussar Regiment, 1797-1801.

1051. Trumpeter. Mariupol Hussar Regiment, 1797-1801.

1052. Staff-Trumpeter. Aleksandriya Hussar Regiment, 1797-1800.

1053. Officer and Non-commissioned Officer. Izyum Hussar Regiment, 1797-1801.

1054. Shabrack and Sabertache for Hussar Officers, 1797-1801.

1055. Non-commissioned Officer and Officer (in undress coat [vengerka]). Akhtyrka Hussar Regiment, 1797-1801.

1056 and 1057. General, Yelisavetgrad Hussar Regiment, and Trumpeter, Olviopol Hussar Regiment, 1797-1801.

1058. Officer and Private. Chorba’s Hussar Regiment, 1798-1801.

1059. Bombardier and Fireworker. Foot Artillery, 1796-1801.

1061. Officer. Foot Artillery, 1797-1801.

1062. Junior Train Master [Unter-Furmeister]. Field Artillery, 1797-1801.

1063. Bombardier and Fireworker. Horse Artillery, 1797-1801.

1064. Officer. Horse Artillery, 1797-1801.

1065. Musician. Foot Artillery, 1797-1801.

1066. Pioneer, 1797-1801.

1067. Pioneer Cap, 1797-1801.

1068. Pioneers. Non-commissioned Officer and Drummer, 1797-1801.

1069. Sapper, 1797-1801.

1070. Sapper Cap, 1797-1801.

1071. Pioneer Regimental Drummer, 1797-1801.

1072. Company-grade Officer. Pioneer Regiment, 1797-1801.

1073. Pontooneers, 1797-1801.

1074. Pontooneers, 1797-1801. (In working dress.)

1075. Officer and Non-commissioned Officer. Pontoon Depots, 1797-1801.

1076. Engineer Officer, 1800-1801.

1077. Musketeers. St.-Petersburg and Moscow Garrisons, 1796-1800.

1078. Non-commissioned Officers. Viborg and Fredrikshamn Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1079. Musketeer Drummer. Reval Garrison, 1797-1800.

1080. Non-commissioned Officer and Private. Grenadier Companies of the Riga Garrison, 1797-1800.

1081. Fifer and Drummer. Grenadier Companies of the Archangel Garrison, 1797-1801.

1082. Regimental Drummers. Kazan and Orenburg Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1083. Company-grade Officers. Taganrog, Smolensk, and Kiev Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1084. Field-grade Officers. Selenginsk and Tobolsk Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1085. Generals. Baltic and Dünamünde Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1086. Non-commissioned Officer and Officer. Kronstadt Garrison, 1797-1800.

1087. Musketeer. Narva Garrison, 1797-1800.

1088. Non-commissioned Officers. Yelisavetgrad, Dimitrii, and Azov Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1089. Musketeer Drummer. Omsk Garrison, 1797-1800.

1090. Regimental Drummers. Astrakhan, Kizlyar, and Tsaritsyn Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1091. Company-grade Officers. Schlüsselburg, Villmanstrand, and Kexholm Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1092. Field-grade Officers. Nyslott, Pernau, and Arensburg Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1093. Generals. Bakhmut, Tambovsk, and Voronezh Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1094. Musketeer, Vladimir Garrison, 1797-1800. Garrison Invalid, 1797-1801.

1095. Non-commissioned Officers, Simbirsk Garrison, 1797-1801. Invalid Non-commissioned Officer, 1797-1801.

1096. Company Drummers, Nizhnii-Novgorod Garrison, 1797-1800. Invalid Company Drummer, 1797-1801.

1097. Company-grade Officers, Novgorod Garrison, 1797-1800. Invalid Company-grade Officer, 1797-1801.

1098. Musketeer. Tver Garrison, 1797-1800.

1099. Musketeer. Aleksandrovsk Garrison, 1797-1800.

1100. Non-commissioned Officers. Kirilov, Petrovsk, and Nikitinsk Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1101. Musketeer. Perekop Garrison, 1797-1800.

1102. Non-commissioned Officers. Stavropol Garrison, 1797-1800.

1103. Non-commissioned Officers. Orsk, Kizilsk, and Verkhneuralsk Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1104. Non-commissioned Officers. Troitsk and Zverinogolovsk Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1105. Musketeers. Senno and Dünaburg Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1106. Musketeer, Vitebsk Garrison, and Officer, Polotsk Garrison, 1797-1800.

1107. Field-grade Officers. Rogachev and Staryi-Bykhov Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1108. General. Tomsk Garrison, 1797-1800.

1109. Musketeer. Semipalatinsk Garrison, 1797-1800.

1110. Field-grade Officers. Biisk and Petropavlovsk Garrisons, 1797-1800.

1111. Musketeer. Mozdok Garrison, 1797-1800.

1112. Non-commissioned Officer. Saratov Garrison, 1797-1800.

1113. Company-grade Officer and Grenadiers. Rochensalm Garrison, 1798-1800.

1114. Grenadier and Company-grade Officer. Sevastopol Garrison, 1798-1800.

1115. General and Musketeer. Nikolaev Garrison, 1798-1800.

1116. Field-grade Officer and Musketeer. Nizhne-Kamchatka Garrison, 1798-1800.

1117. Musketeer and Field-grade Officer. Semipalatinsk, Petropavlovsk, Verkhneuralsk, and Troitsk Garrisons, 1800-1801.

1118. Non-commissioned Officer. Nizhne-Kamchatka Garrison, 1800-1801.

 

 

 

IV. CUIRASSIER REGIMENTS
[
Kirasirskie polki]

 

29 November 1796 – At the same time as a new set of Military Regulations [Voinskii Ustav] was promulgated, there were new directives regarding the clothing and weapons of Army Cuirassier Regiments. [Note: Here “Army” means “not Guards.” – M.C.] These directives, with only the smallest changes, guided the formulation of the organizational authorization tables [shtaty] confirmed by HIGHEST authority on 5 January, and there were almost no changes for the rest of EMPEROR PAUL I’s reign.

Based on the 1796 regulations and 1798 tables, a private Cuirassier was prescribed clothing, weapons, and accouterments as follows: coat, waistcoat, breeches, boots, boot cuffs, gloves, hat with plume, cloak, forage cap, smock, warm coat, broad sword with sword knot, sword belt, sabertache, girdle, cuirass, carbine, cross belt, cartridge pouch with strap, and in mounted order—a pair of pistols. Horse furniture and its appurtenances included: saddle with saddle bucket, holsters, bridle, mouthpiece, cruppers, chestband, saddle girth, stirrups, cushion for the pack load, and horse cloth; shabrack, pistol holder covers, valise, forage sack, bag, and water flask.

Coat [kolet] – at first prescribed to be of straw colored kersey [palevaya kirza] but from February 1797 of white kersey, and if there was a shortage of that material, then of white cloth. Cut exactly as already described for coats of Gatchina Cuirassiers or Gendarmes. It had a fold-down cloth collar sewn down on all four sides, slit cuffs, and two shoulder straps, all of the distinctive regimental color. Along the edges of the front opening from the neck to the waist, and along the edges of the polki or tails—wool galloon or tape [galun ili bason] 3/4 vershok [5/8 inch]wide (Illus. Nos. 1017 and 1018)(1).

Waistcoat [kamzol] – of the same pattern as for infantry except with small hooks instead of buttons. It was of cloth the same color as the collar and cuffs of the coat (2).

Breeches [shtany] – of deerskin [losinnyi] (3).

Boots [sapogi] – with blunt toes, bell tops, large heels, iron spurs, leather straps over and under the spurs [nadshporniki i podshporniki] (4).

Boot cuffs [shtibel’-manzhety] – of white shirt linen (5).

Neckcloth[galstuk] – of black cloth, unlined, tied with ribbon in the back (6).

Gloves [perchatki] – chamois, with gauntlet cuffs as for infantry non-commissioned officers except with pointed and not rounded ends or corners (7).

Hat [shlyapa] – three cornered, 4 vershoks [7 inches] high, with pointed corners bent downward; bound with a black woollen cord; tassels at the side corners, with their associated cord, of black and yellow wool (later—red wool); a cockade of black worsted ribbon with two orange edgings; with a button the same color as the facings on the officer’s uniform; a plume of fine white cock feathers, with black and yellow feathers at the top or bottom (Illus. 1017 and 1019) (8).

Cloak [plashch] – of green cloth with a narrow standing collar the same color as the collar of the coat, and with a single flat brass button (Illus. 1020) (9).

Forage cap [furazhnaya shapka] – of the same pattern as for infantry, with a white top and a band the same color as the collar (Illus. 1021) (10).

Smock [kitel] – made from coarse calamanco [kalamenko], with a small standing collar and large flat covered buttons, six on each side of the front (Illus. 1021) (11).

Warm coat [fufaika] –  for winter, of sheepskin (12).

Broadsword [palash] – of almost the same pattern as for Dragoons under EMPRESS CATHERINE II from 1778 to 1786, i.e. with a brass basket hilt ending at the top with an eagle’s head; with a scabbard in steel mountings with rings for swordbelt straps (Illus. 1022) (13).

Sword knot [temlyak] – with a strap of black (later red) leather, and a tassel of twisted worsted: in the 1st or Leib-Squadron – white; 2nd – orange, 3rd – black, 4th – sky blue, and 5th – green (Illus. 1022) (14).

Swordbelt [portupeya] – of thick red Russian leather [yuft’] 1 vershok [1-3/4 inches] wide; fastened in front with a brass buckle and having on the left half three brass rings through which are passed five straps of the same red Russian leather, with brass buckles: two at the end for the broadsword and three in the middle for the sabertache (Illus. 1022) (15).

Sabertache [tashka] – of black leather with a covering of cloth the same color as the coat collar; trimmed with white woolen tape [bason] around the edges; with a crown, IMPERIAL monogram, and laurel wreath, all of yellow or white cloth (according to the color of the buttons), and with three brass rings at the top for the above mentioned straps (Illus. 1022). Width of the sabertache – 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches], length in the middle - 6 vershoks [10-1/2 inches], length at the edges – 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] (16).

Girdle [kushak] – of stamin, the same color as the coat collar, 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] wide, 4 vershoks [7 inches] long, with pointed ends and three stripes along the whole length (Illus. 1022) (17).

Cuirass [kiras] – black, trimmed all around with red leather and lined with white quilted linen; held to the Cuirassier with the help of two deerskin straps. One strap was slit down almost its whole length into two halves and thus three ends were formed, of which the two narrow ones were fastened to the upper edges of the cuirass and the remaining wide one folded back in half to become a kind of loop. The other strap was passed through this loop and girded, so to speak, the Cuirassier, being fastened in front of the cuirass with a brass buckle and prong (Illus. 1022) (18).

Carbine [karabin] – with brass fittings, and with a sling, lock cover [ognivnyi chekhol], andfrizzen cover [polunagalishche]all of red Russian leather. Length—1 arshin 14 vershoks [4 feet 3-3/8 inches] (Illus. 1022) (19).

Shoulder belt [pogonnaya perevyaz] – 2-1/2 vershoks [4 3/8 inches] wide, with brass buckle, frame, and end piece. Trimmed along the edges with wool tape [bason] 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, of the same color as the tape on the coat (Illus. 1022) (20).

Cartridge pouch [ lyadunka] – for 30 cartridges, made from thick black leather; with the same brass plate on the cover as for infantry pouches except smaller. It had a deerskin strap 1-1/3 vershoks [2 1/3 inches] wide, with side stitching [proshivki] on the edges. As before, this strap was fastened to two brass rings sewn onto the sides of the pouch (Illus. 1022) (21).

Pistols [pistolety] – 12 3/4 vershoks [22 3/8 inches] long, with brass mountings and the EMPEROR’S monogram in the bend of the stock [na izlozhine] (Illus. 1022) (22).

Saddle [sedlo] – German, of the pattern for Russian Cuirassiers before the changes brought in by Prince Potemkin. It was of black leather; all straps and cushions black; iron bridle bits [uzdechnyya udila] and stirrups; curb bits likewise of iron, with brass disks [bukli] decorated with the image of a two-headed eagle; horse cloth [popona] of white cloth (23).

Shabrack [cheprak]andpistol holder covers [chushki] – of the pattern for infantry officers. Made from cloth, of the same color as the coat collar; trimmed around the edges with woolen tape and decorated with the same monogram and laurel wreath as on the sabertache, but without a crown (Illus. 1023) (24).

Valise [chemodan] – 1 arshin 2 vershoks [31-1/2 inches] long, 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] in diameter; of white cloth with four flat brass buttons (25).

Forage sack [furazhnyi sak] – of almost the same size as the valise, but made from coarse calamanco (26).

Bag [torba] for feeding the horse. Of thick linen (27).

Water flask [vodonosnaya flyazha] – wooden, wrapped or covered with leather (30).

In addition to the items listed here, each squadron was issued 16 tinned copper kettles [mednye, luzhenye kotly] with lids, 16 sickles [kosy] for gathering hay, and 20 axes(29).

Cuirassier horse [loshad’ kirasirskaya] — prescribed to be of any color, at a price of 120 roubles (30).

Noncommissioned officers and first sergeants of Cuirassier regiments [unter-ofitsery i vakhmistry Kirasirskikh polkov]had the same uniform as cuirassier privates, but without shoulder straps and with gold or silver galloon on the collar and cuffs of the coat, according to the distinctions on the officers’ uniforms. Tassels on the hat were white with a center of black and orange worsted [garus]. They also had the additional distinction of the black and orange feathers being at the top of the plume instead of at the bottom (Illus. 1023). Like infantry non-commissioned officers, they were authorized a cane [trost’] which in mounted order was fastened by a wrist strap to the butt of the right-hand pistol, with the lower end passed through one or another strap, most probably the horse’s chest band [paperst’]. Of the weapons and accouterments of private cuirassiers, they did not have the carbine, crossbelt, and cartridge pouch, but instead they had, under each holster beneath the pistol carriers, six places for cartridges. Also, their saddles had no saddle buckets (31).

Distinguished officer candidates [estandart-yunkera] were uniformed and armed, and had the same horse furniture, as noncommissioned officers, except that the coat had a shoulder strap on the left, and the saddle had a bucket [bushmat] for a standard [shtandart]. To this last item belonged a 3-arshin [84-inch] wide deerskin crossbelt or bandoleer [pantaler] with brass buckle, frame, and end piece, with an iron hook, and with galloon on the edges, gold or silver according to the color of the fringe on the standard (Illus. 1024) (32).

Trumpeters trubachi] were uniformed as private cuirassiers, but their coats had two false sleeves [lopasti] in the back and tape [bason] along all edges and seams, as well as on the sleeves and at the shoulder. The same tape was around the waistcoat. Regardless of the plume itself, there was red plumage around the hat’s edge (Illus. 1024). Of cuirassier weapons and accouterments, they were prescribed only the broadsword, sword belt, and sabertache. Their saddles had no buckets, while trumpets [truby] had worsted tassels and cords in two colors: white and the collar of the coat’s collar and cuffs (33).

Staff trumpeter [shtabnyi trubach or shtab-trubach] – distinguished from squadron trumpeters only in that, like non-commissioned officers, they had gold or silver galloon on the coat’s collar and cuffs. The plume had a top part of black and yellow feathers; non-commissioned officer’s tassels on the hat, and a cane (Illus. 1025) (34).

Kettledrummer [litavrshchik] – all the same uniform clothing, weapons, and accouterments as squadron trumpeters, but the coat was without false sleeves and the saddle without holsters. Kettledrums [litavry] remained as before, i.e. of red copper and weighing 1 pood 10 funty [46 pounds], while their drum banners [zanavesy] were made of material the same color as the coat collar, with gold or silver monograms, galloon, and fringes according to the appointments on officers’ uniforms (Illus. 1026) (35).

Officers wore a coat [kolet] of straw-colored [palevyi] cloth, later white, with collar and cuffs the same color as prescribed for lower ranks, velvet lining to the small tails, and gold or silver galloon down the front opening. Cloth waistcoat the same color as the collar, trimmed on the edges with galloon; deerskin breeches; boots with bell tops and silver or silvered spurs; gaiter tops [shtibel’-manzhety]; chamois gloves with gauntlet cuffs; black neck cloth of serge [sarzhevyi]. The hat had a ribbon or cockade, and a button loop and button, similar to those for generals in the infantry, with tassels of solot [unknown meaning – M.C.] and black silk, later of silver and black silk, with orange. The same plumes as private cuirassiers (Illus. 1027 and 1028). Along with this were prescribed: broadsword, with a gilt hilt decorated with the image of a two-headed eagle, and with brass or steel mountings to the scabbard, in accordance with the uniform’s appointments (Illus. 1029); sword knot, similar to that for an infantry officer but with a flat tassel instead of rounded, and instead of a strap of silver lace—one of black leather, with silver sewn down both edges; deerskin sword belt and black cuirass [kiras] with red cloth lining or trim, along which, in manner similar to galloon, were brass fittings affixed with brass nails of pointed or conical form (Illus. 1029). Similar nails were used to affix a brass plate to deerskin straps that served to fasten the cuirass, and in the front of the cuirass, in an oval surrounded by an armature of military trophies, was the image of a two-headed eagle (Illus. 1029) (36). The sash [sharf] was the same as for infantry officers, and the saddle and all horse furniture straps were black. The bit and stirrups were iron; disks on the mouthpiece were gilded. Shabracks [chepraki] and pistol holders [chushki] were of cloth the same color as prescribed for lower ranks, with gold or silver galloon and monograms to match the galloon on the coat (37).

Apart from the full combatant [polnaya stroevaya] uniform described here, cuirassier officers also had an everyday [vsednevnaya] one used when not on duty. This uniform consisted of a white cloth double-breasted undress coat [vitse-mundir] or caftan [kaftan] with a fall-down collar, lapels, and slit cuffs the same color as the kolet coat collar. It had an aiguillette and buttons the same color as the galloon on the coat, with turned back skirts lined with stamin that with yellow buttons was the same color as the collar but with white buttons was straw-colored (Illus. 1030). With this undress coat was worn a straw-colored cloth waistcoat with flat buttons, white cloth breeches, an epee [shpaga] like that for infantry except with cups that become narrow toward the front. A cane and—already described above—hat, neck cloth, gloves, and boots (38).

Like the lower ranks, all officers powdered their hair and gathered it into curls and a queue [pukly i kosa] braided with black silk ribbon. Generals, as in the infantry, were distinguished only by white plumage [plyumazh] on the hat (Illus. 1030) (39).

Non-combatant ranks [nestroevye chiny], namely squadron medics [fel’dshera] and the regimental saddler [sedel’nik], armorer [ruzheinyi master], and provost [profos], as well as wagon drivers [pogonshchiki] or train personnel [furleity], were uniformed in the manner of non-combatants in infantry regiments, except that they had cuirassier pattern hats (40).

Of non-combatant officer ranks,the regimental Quartermaster [polkovyi Kvartermeister] and Auditor [Auditor] were uniformed as Quartermasters and Auditors, and the Doctor [Lekar’] as for Doctors, in Army infantry, except that they had the different hat prescribed for cavalry. The stablemaster [shtalmeister] was prescribed the same coat as the Doctor but with dark-green worsted buttons (Illus. 1031) (41).

Along with these regulations for the uniforms and weapons of Cuirassier regiments, they were the following distinctions between them:

In HIS MAJESTY’S Leib-Cuirassier Regiment:
    For lower ranks—sky-blue [goluboi] collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; white lace [bason] with sky-blue stripes and checks (Illus. 1017). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of sky-blue velvet; silver appointments; gallon with indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (Illus. 1017) (42).

In HER MAJESTY’S Leib-Cuirassier Regiment:
    For lower ranks—raspberry [malinovyi] collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; white lace with raspberry stripes and checks (Illus. 1019). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of raspberry velvet; silver appointments; gallon with indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (Illus. 1020) (43).

In the Military Order Cuirassier Regiment:
    For lower ranks—black collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace with two black stripes and one white; on the sabertache—yellow, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—yellow with a black stripe (Illus. 1023). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of black velvet; gold appointments (Illus. 1023); gallon with indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (44).

In the Yekaterinoslav Regiment:
    For lower ranks—orange collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace with two orange stripes and one white; on the sabertache—white, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—white with an orange stripe (Illus. 1024). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of orange velvet; silver appointments; gallon with indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (45).

In the Kazan Regiment:
    For lower ranks—raspberry collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace raspberry; on the sabertache—yellow, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—yellow with a raspberry stripe (Illus. 1024). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of raspberry velvet; gold appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (46).

In the Ryazan Regiment:
    For lower ranks—sky-blue collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace with two sky-blue stripes and one white; on the sabertache—yellow, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—yellow with a sky-blue stripe (Illus. 1025). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of sky-blue velvet; gold appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (47).

In the Yamburg Regiment:
    For lower ranks—herring-grey [seladonovyi] collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace herring grey; on the sabertache—yellow, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—yellow with a herring-grey stripe. For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of herring-grey velvet; gold appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (48).

In the Glukhov Regiment:
    For lower ranks—herring-grey collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace of two herring-grey stripes and one white; on the sabertache—white, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—white with a herring-grey stripe (Illus. 1025). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of herring-grey velvet; silver appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (49).

In the Kiev Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Yellow collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace yellow; on the sabertache—white, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—white with a yellow stripe (Illus. 1026). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of yellow velvet; silver appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (50).

In the Nezhin Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Violet [fioletovyi] collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace with two violet stripes and one white; on the sabertache—yellow, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—yellow with a violet stripe (Illus. 1026). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of violet velvet; gold appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (51).

In the Sofiya Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Orange collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace with two orange stripes and one white; on the sabertache—yellow, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—yellow with an orange stripe. For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of orange velvet; gold appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (Illus. 1027) (52).

In the Starodub Regiment:
    For lower ranks—red collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace red; on the sabertache—white, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—white with a red stripe. For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of red velvet; silver appointments (Illus. 1027); gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (Illus. 1027) (53).

In the Chernigov Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Violet collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace violet; on the sabertache—white, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—white with a violet stripe. For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of violet velvet; silver appointments (Illus. 1028); gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (54).

In the Riga Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Red collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace with two red stripes and one white; on the sabertache—yellow, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—yellow with a red stripe. For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of red velvet; gold appointments (Illus. 1028); gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (55).

In the Kharkov Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Black collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace black; on the sabertache—white, and on the shabrack and pistol holders—white with a black stripe. For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of black velvet; silver appointments (Illus. 1030); gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (56).

In the Little-Russia Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Yellow collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace with two yellow stripes and one white; on the sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders—yellow. For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of yellow velvet; gold appointments (Illus. 1030); gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (57).

 

5 January 1798 – With the introduction of the Regimental Wagon Master [Polkovyi Vagenmeister] into the organizational table for Cuirassier regiments, he was prescribed the same uniform and weapons as non-commissioned officers. Along with this, for all ranks the green cloaks were replaced by white ones (58).

In the three Cuirassier regiments (Lieutenant General Neplyuev’s, Major General Friderici’s, and Major General Zorn’s) established on 20 August 1798, the colors for uniforms were as follows:

In Neplyuev’s Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Dark-blue [sinii] collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace dark blue; on the sabertache—white, and on the shabrack and pistol holders— white with a dark-blue stripe (Illus. 1032). For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of dark-blue velvet; silver appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (59).

In Friderici’s Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Dark-blue [sinii] collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace with two dark-blue stripes and one white (Illus. 1032); on the sabertache—yellow, and on the shabrack and pistol holders— yellow with a dark-blue stripe. For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of dark-blue velvet; gold appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (60).

In Zorn’s Regiment:
    For lower ranks—Dark-green collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, waistcoat, sash, sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders; coat lace with two dark-green stripes and one white (Illus. 1032); on the sabertache—yellow, and on the shabrack and pistol holders— yellow with a dark-green stripe. For officers—collar, cuffs, and skirt turnback lining of green velvet; gold appointments; gallon without indentations on shabracks and pistol holders (61).

8 October 1798 – As a sign of HIGHEST benevolence, HER MAJESTY’S Leib-Cuirassier Regiment was granted, in place of the monograms on sabertaches, pistol holders, and shabracks, eight-pointed stars with a black two-headed eagle in the center on an orange field. For lower ranks the stars were white, and for officers—silver (Illus. 1033) (62).

9 October 1799 – The “acorns” [shishki] above the tassels on officers’ sashes, sword knots and hat tassels, and on the sword knots of lower ranks, were ordered to be raspberry, and there were to be three colors in the stripes and tassels: black, orange, and raspberry (64).

11 February 1801HIS MAJESTY’S Leib-Cuirassier Regiment was ordered to have, on sabertaches, shabracks, and pistol holders, stars of the pattern granted to HER MAJESTY’S Leib-Cuirassier Regiment (65).

 

 

V. DRAGOON REGIMENTS
[
Dragunskie polki]

 

At the same time as for Cuirassiers, there were changes in the uniforms and weapons of Dragoon regiments. Based on these changes, each private dragoon was prescribed: coat of the color and pattern for jägers, with an aiguillette the same color as the buttons, with a shoulder strap—and for lower ranks also lapels—of the same color as the collar and cuffs, and with straw-colored kersey lining (Illus. 1034); waistcoat, of the pattern for infantry, of straw-colored cloth; deerskin breeches, and in case of a shortage of deerskin—goatskin or other buckskin-like leather; boots, gaiter tops, neck cloth, gloves, hat, forage cap, smock, warm coat, and cloak—all of the patterns for cuirassiers except for the last item being all green, and the gloves the same color as the waistcoat (66).

Weapons and accouterments consisted of: broadsword, similar to that for cuirassiers but with a lion’s head on the hilt instead of an eagle’s, and with a scabbard that instead of iron fittings had only a brass hook and endpiece inserted under the leather; sword knot in an infantry sword belt with a bayonet scabbard, finished with ochre the same color as the waistcoat; musket [mushket] 2 arshins [56 inches] long without the bayonet and 2-1/2 arshins [70 inches] with the bayonet, with brass mountings, iron bar [zheleznyi pogon], and sling (Illus. 1035), firelock cover and frizzen cover of Russian leather; cartridge pouch of thick black leather of the same size and appearance as for cuirassiers, and a cartridge-pouch belt the same color as the waistcoat, of the same width as cuirassier cross belt, and with the same buckle, frame, endpiece, and hook. Pistols, saddle, and all other horse furniture were the same as those prescribed for Cuirassier regiments except that the first item was a little smaller, while the shabrack and pistol covers had no monograms and instead of tape—cloth trim around the edges (Illus. 1034) (67). A dragoon horse was prescribed to cost from 60 to 80 roubles (68). Non-commssioned officers, the supply sergeant [fur’er], and sergeant [vakhtmeister], while wearing the same uniform as private dragoons, were distinguished by gold or silver (according to the color of the buttons) galloon along the edges of the collar, cuffs, and pocket flaps, and furthermore—by the black and yellow feathers on their plumes being at the top rather than at the base (Illus. 1036) (69). Of dragoon weapons and accouterments, they were not authorized the carbine and pouch, in place of which they had, on the holsters, six places for pistol cartridges. Also, their sword belts had no frog for a bayonet scabbard nor did their saddles have a saddle bucket [bushmat]. Like cuirassier non-commissioned officers, they were prescribed to have canes (70).

Distinguished officer candidate [fanen-yunker]—the same uniform, weapons, and horse furniture as for the preceding non-commissioned officers but the saddle had a bucket for a standard, and they had a deerskin cross belt for the latter item similar to that for cuirassiers but without trim (Illus. 1037) (71).

Drummers [barabanshchiki] were uniformed as private dragoons but with wings [kryl’tsy] on the shoulders the same color as the collar, a strap on the right shoulder, and four sewn-on stripes [nashivki] on each sleeve, of white woolen tape [bason] with stripes with a zigzag line [zmeika] between them, also the same color as the collar. The exact same tape was sewn onto the wings (Illus. 1038). Weapons, accouterments, and horse furniture—the same as for non-commissioned officers, with thedrum, cross belt, and apron the same as for infantry drummers, the first with tooth-shaped triangles on the hoops in two colors: light green and the color of the collar (72).

Trumpeters [trubachi]had the uniform, weapons, and horse furniture all similar to those for drummers except for red plumage around the hat and no shoulder strap or wings on the coat. There were two false sleeves on the back of the coat, which was trimmed with tape: along all seams; the edges of the collar, cuffs, and pocket flaps; on the false sleeves; and on the breast around the button holes, with these last having small tassels the same color as the tape (Illus. 1039). Trumpets [truby] were the same as in Cuirassier regiments, with worsted cords colored white and the two regimental colors, i.e. light green and that prescribed for the collar (73).

Staff-trumpeter [stab-trubach]—everything the same as for squadron trumpeters except that the coat had gold or silver galloon (according to the color of the buttons) on the collar, cuffs, and pocket flaps. The top of the plume was of black and yellow feathers, and a cane was authorized (Illus. 1040) (74).

Hautboy players [goboisty] had the same as for trumpeters except that the coat had no false sleeves and the hat no plumage (Illus. 1041) (75).

Kettledrummer [litavrshchik]—uniformed and armed as the trumpeters, but his coat had no false sleeves (Illus. 1042). The horse furniture and kettledrums were of the patterns prescribed for kettledrummers in Cuirassier regiments, i.e. the saddle had no holsters. The drum banners [zanavesy] were the same color as the collar, with embroidery, galloon, and fringes the color of the buttons (76).

Officers had the same coat as private dragoons but without a shoulder strap, and with gilt or silvered buttons and an aiguillette in the same color. Straw-colored waistcoat, with the same color buttons as on the coat.Deerskin breeches, whitened. Boots, gaiter tops, neck cloth, sword knot, and sash—the exact same patterns as for officers in Cuirassier regiments, while gloves, sword belt, and broadsword were similar to those for dragoons except that the last item had a gilt hilt, hook, and end piece. Horse furniture was prescribed to be the same as for Cuirassier officers. In all regiments shabracks and pistol holders had flat galloon (the same color as the buttons), without toothed indentations and with sewn-on silver tracery, with a gold or silver (according to the galloon) cord instead of monograms (Illus. 1043 and 1044) (77).

Generals were distinguished from officers only by white plumage around the hat (Illus. 1045) (78).

All combatant ranks in Dragoon regiments wore their coats, with officers adding a sash, according to the time of year, in the exact same manner as in the infantry (79).

Uniforms for non-combatant lower ranks (regimental saddler, armorer, spur maker [shpornyi master], provost, squadron medics, and wagon drivers or train personnel) as well as for non-combatants in officer ranks (regimental Quartermaster, Auditor, and Doctor) were exactly the same as for these ranks in Cuirassier regiments (80).

Colors and other distinctions prescribed for Dragoon regiments were as follows:

In the Vladimir Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with sky-blue collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow aiguillette and buttons; sky-blue shabrack and pistol holders, with white trim (Illus. 1034). For officers—gold buttonhole loops, with small tassels (Illus. 1034) (81).

In the Astrakhan Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with yellow collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white aiguillette and buttons; yellow shabrack and pistol holders, with white trim (Illus. 1036). For officers—silver buttonhole loops, with small tassels (Illus. 1036) (82).

In the Nizhnii-Novgorod Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with black collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap, no lapels; white aiguillette and buttons; black shabrack and pistol holders, with white trim (Illus. 1037). For officers—silver buttonhole loops, with small tassels (Illus. 1036) (83).

In the Pskov Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with red cloth collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap, no lapels; yellow aiguillette and buttons (Illus. 1038); red shabrack and pistol holders, with yellow trim. For officers—gold buttonhole loops with small tassels, and worsted velvet [tripovyi] collar and cuffs (84).

In the St.-Peterburg Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with rose pink [rozovyi] collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap, no lapels; yellow aiguillette and buttons; rose pink shabrack and pistol holders, with yellow trim. For officers—gold buttonhole loops, with small tassels (Illus. 1039) (85).

In the Smolensk Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with orange [oranzhevyi] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow aiguillette and buttons (Illus. 1039); orange shabrack and pistol holders, with yellow trim. For officers—gold buttonhole loops, with small tassels (86).

In the Taganrog Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with yellow collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow aiguillette and buttons; yellow shabrack and pistol holders, with likewise yellow trim. For officers—gold buttonhole loops, with small tassels (87).

In the Irkutsk Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with white collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap, no lapels; yellow aiguillette and buttons (Illus. 1041); white shabrack and pistol holders, with yellow trim. For officers—gold buttonhole loops, without small tassels (Illus. 1041) (88).

In the Orenburg Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with black collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow aiguillette and buttons (Illus. 1042); black shabrack and pistol holders, with yellow trim. For officers—gold buttonhole loops, with small tassels (89).

In the Siberia Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with white collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap, no lapels; white aiguillette and buttons (Illus. 1042); white shabrack and pistol holders, with likewise white trim. For officers—silver buttonhole loops, with small tassels (90).

In the Ingermanland Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with raspberry [malinovyi] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white aiguillette and buttons (Illus. 1042); raspberry shabrack and pistol holders, with white trim. For officers—silver buttonhole loops, with small tassels (91).

In the Narva Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with sky-blue collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white aiguillette and buttons; sky-blue shabrack and pistol holders, with white trim. For officers—silver buttonhole loops, without small tassels (Illus. 1043) (92).

In the Rostov Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with red cloth collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white aiguillette and buttons; red cloth shabrack and pistol holders, with white trim. For officers—silver buttonhole loops with small tassels, and worsted velvet lapels and cuffs (Illus. 1043) (93).

In the Moscow Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with rose pink collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap, no lapels; white aiguillette and buttons; rose pink shabrack and pistol holders, with white trim. For officers—silver buttonhole loops, with small tassels (Illus. 1044) (94).

In the Seversk Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with orange collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white aiguillette and buttons; orange shabrack and pistol holders, with white trim. For officers—silver buttonhole loops, with small tassels (Illus. 1045) (95).

In the Kargopol Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with raspberry collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white aiguillette and buttons; raspberry shabrack and pistol holders, with white trim. For officers—silver buttonhole loops, with small tassels (Illus. 1045) (96).

5 January 1798 – The Wagon Masters [Vagenmeistery] introduced into the organizational table for Dragoon regiments were prescribed the same uniforms, accouterments, and weapons as combatant non-commissioned officers. The green cloaks were replaced by white ones and the price of a horse for combatant dragoons was set at 60 roubles (97).

29 May 1798 – In the Nizhnii-Novgorod Dragoon Regiment, the black color of collars, cuffs, shoulder straps, shabracks, and pistol holders was changed to orange (98).

In the two Dragoon regiments (Major General Schreiders’ and Major General Khastatov’s) established on 20 August 1798, the colors for uniforms were as follows:

In Schreiders’ Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with rose pink collar, lapels, cuffs and shoulder straps; yellow aiguillette and buttons (Illus. 1046); rose pink shabrack, and pistol holders, with yellow trim. For officers— gold buttonhole loops, with small tassels (99).
In Khastatov’s Regiment:
    For lower ranks—coat with rose pink collar, lapels, cuffs and shoulder straps; white aiguillette and buttons (Illus. 1046); rose pink shabrack, and pistol holders, with white trim. For officers— silver buttonhole loops, with small tassels (100).

31 January 1799 – The cloaks established by the warrant of 5 January 1798 were replaced by dark-green greatcoats of the same pattern as for cuirassiers (101).

9 October 1799 - The acorn knots [shishki] on officers’ sashes and on lower ranks’ sword knots,were ordered to be raspberry-colored, and stripes and tassels were to be in three colors: black, orange, and raspberry (102).

3 April 1800 – The ten-squadron Dragoon regiments formed by joining two five-squadron regiments were ordered to have uniforms as follows:

Obrezkov’s Regiment, formed from the former Vladimir and Taganrog regiments—the uniform of the Vladimir regiment (Illus. 1034) (103).
Pushkin’s Regiment, formed from the former Narva and Nizhnii-Novgorod regiments—the uniform of the Nizhnii-Novgorod regiment (Illus. 1037 and the entry for 29 May 1798) (104).
Sacken 2nd’s Regiment, formed from the former Irkutsk and Siberia regiments—the uniform of the Siberia rregiment (Illus. 1042) (105).

 

 

VI. HUSSAR REGIMENTS
[
Gusarskie polki]

 

At the beginning of EMPEROR PAUL I’s reign all Army Hussar regiments received uniforms of almost exactly the same pattern and style as those of the Gatchina hussars. Uniform items, arms, and accouterments prescribed for a private hussar comprised: pelisse, dolman, chakchiry breeches, boots, neck cloth, headdress, forage cap, cloak, warm coat, saber, sword knot, sword belt, sabertache, barrel sash, carbine, cross belt, cartridge pouch, and a pair of pistols; horse furniture consisted of: saddle, with holsters and other appurtenances; saddle cloth, valise, forage sack, feed bag, and water flask.

The pelisse [mentiya] was made of cloth of a different color for each regiment, with a standing collar and sheepskin trim (white in almost all the regiments); worsted cords with fifteen large round buttons and thirty small flat buttons, yellow or tinned (Illus. 1047) (106).

Dolman [dulaman]—of cloth, also of a different color for each regiment, with standing collar and pointed cuffs; worsted cords with 45 buttons a little smaller than those on the pelisse; trimmed with red leather at the elbows and around the hooks and eyes (Illlus. 1047) (107).

Breeches [chakchiry]—of white cloth (Illus. 1047) (108).

Boots [sapogi]—with blunt toes, knee length, with a notch cut out at the back, and with iron spurs driven in (Illus. 1047) (109).

Neck cloth [galstuk]—of black cloth, no trim, tied with ribbons at the back (110).

Headdress [shapka]—5-1/2 vershoks [9-5/8 inches] high, trimmed with black dog hair [sobachii mekh]; a cloth top or bag [meshok] the same color as the dolman; with two worsted cords and tassels the same color as the cords on the dolman; and with a plume of fine white feathers (Illus. 1047 and 1048) (111).

Forage cap [shapka furazhnaya]—of cloth, the same pattern as for infantry, and the same color as the pelisse; with or without a band (112).

Cloak [plashch]—of white cloth, of the pattern for cuirassiers and dragoons (113).

Warm coat [fufaika]—for winter, of sheepskin (114).

Saber [sablya]—1 arshin 4 vershoks [35 inches] long (from the base of the hilt to the tip of the blade); with a steel hilt and iron mountings on the scabbard (Illus. 1049) (115).

Sword knot [temlyak]—of red Russian leather, with a similar tassel (116).

Sword belt [portupeya]—also of red Russian leather; 3/4 vershok [1-3/8 inches] wide, with a brass hook for fastening, and with three brass rings for fitting the straps: two holding the saber and three the sabertache (117).

Sabertache—of plain unblackened leather with cloth over the cover in the same color as the dolman, with cloth trim that is flat in some regiments but toothed in others; and with an IMPERIAL monogram and crown the same color as the trim (Illus. 1049 and 1054) (118).

Barrel sash, or girdle [poyas]—of thin worsted cords with cross ties or bindings, or with slides [s perevyazkami ili perevivkami, inache gombami]; with two cords and tassels the same color as the latter parts, and with two toggles for fastening (Illus. 1049) (119).

Carbine [karabin]—with brass fittings, iron ramrod, and a likewise iron bar with ring (Illus. 1049); and with a frizzen cover of black leather from a cow that has not yet calved (120).

Shoulder belt [pogonnaya perevyaz’]—deerskin, of the pattern for cuirassiers except narrower and without trim; with a brass buckle, frame, and end piece, and an iron hook (121).

Cartridge pouch [lyadunka]—of red Russian leather and a similar strap passed through two brass rings fastened to the sides; with places for twenty cartridges, and with a small iron rammer or ramrod [priboinik ili shampol] for pistols (Illus. 1049) (122).

Pistols [pistolety]—10-1/2 vershoks [18-3/8 inches] long, with brass fittings and without a ramrod (Illus. 1049) (123).

Saddle [sedlo]—without a saddle bucket; of black leather, as are the holsters and all straps; with iron buckles and stirrups (124).

Saddle cloth [valtrap]—of cloth, usually the same color as the pelisse; with toothed cloth trim in a regimental color; with piping around the teeth of the very same cord as prescribed for dolmans, and with IMPERIAL crowns and monograms in the corners or wings, the same color as the cord (Illus. 1049 and 1054) (125).

Valise [chemodan]—of white cloth, with four buttons covered with the same (126).

Forage sack and feed bag [furazhnyi sak i torba]—canvas (127).

Water flask [vodonosnaya flyazha]—of wood and lined with black leather; with a likewise black leather strap and an iron buckle (128).

Hussar horse [loshad’ gusarskaya]—authorized to be of any color at a price from 30 to 50 roubles (129).

Non-commissioned officers, the quartermaster, distinguished officer candidate, and sergeant [Unter-ofitsery, kvartermistr, shandart-yunker i vakhmistr] were distinguished from private hussars by gold or silver galloon (according to the color of the buttons) on pelisses and dolmans: along the lower half of the collar and on the sleeves—1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, and on the breast behind the buttons—narrow, the same width as the cord (Illus. 1050). All these ranks wore chamois gloves with gauntlet cuffs and carried a cane, but did not have a carbine, cross strap, or cartridge pouch, in place of which there were places for six pistol cartridges on each of the holsters under the saddle cloth (130).

Squadron trumpeters [eskadronnye trubachi]—prescribed everything as for non-commissioned officer ranks, and distinguished from non-commissioned officers only by wings or shells [rakoviny] on the pelisse’s shoulders, of worsted galloon the same color as the cords; they did not have gloves or canes. –Their trumpets [truby] were brass with cords and tassels the same color of the cords on the dolman (Illus. 1051) (131).

Staff-trumpeter [shtab-trubach]—also of non-commissioned officer rank, he had all the same uniform clothing, weapons, accouterments, and horse furniture as squadron trumpeters but with the addition of gloves and a cane, and with the exception of the trumpeter, which he was not authorized (Illus. 1052) (132).

None of the ranks named here powdered their hair. By previous long-time hussar custom, they wore their hair in long twisted temple locks [viski] and short queues [kosy] tied with a black ribbon about level with the neck cloth (Illus. 1048) (133).

Officers [ofitsery]—uniforms of the exact same colors and cut as for private hussars but all cords, tassels, and buttons were gold or silver, according to the color of the lower ranks’ buttons. On the pelisse and dolman there was galloon and a fine fringe along the sides of the chest. The trim on the pelisse was of fox fur, and on the headdress—sable. In the base of the plume were black and orange feathers. The barrel sash was of silver cords with black and orange silk, and silver slides. The saber had a gilt hilt and brass or steel mountings on the scabbard, according to the color of the buttons. The sword knot was of the pattern for infantry officers. The sword belt, sabertache, and their suspension slings were of red morocco leather [saf’yan]. On sabertaches and saddle cloths, instead of monograms, were sewn two-headed eagles with crowns—the former of gold, silver, and black silk, and the latter of only gold (Illus. 1053 and 1054). In parade order they used black leather sarsamy [decorative harness] as part of their horse furniture (134).

When not in formation, officers of Hussar regiments had the right to wear cloth vengerki coats lined with red stamin. These vengerki coats were of the color prescribed for the pelisse and had this item’s buttons, cords, and galloon, with the addition of fur lining in the winter. In the back, they were completely closed without a rear opening, while in the front they had skirts folded upwards to that both knees could be seen; with the ends fastened by buttons. When wearing these coats, officers were without sashes and sabertaches, and wore the normal cavalry hats described above (Illus. 1055) (135).

Generals were distinguished from officers only by the hat having a high plume of straight white ostrich feathers with small black and yellow cock feathers at the base, stuck into a metal tube, or chelenga, with two-headed black eagle and a gold eagle’s wing, similar to those for Leib-Hussars of the time of EMPRESS CATHERINE II (Illus. 1056 and 1057) (136).

Officers and generals of Hussar regiments both powdered their hair and wore the same curls and queues as in the heavy cavalry, except that the latter were shorter (137).

Uniform clothing for the non-combatant lower ranks: armorer, squadron medics, andfarriers [ruzheinyi master i eskadronnye fel’dshera i konovaly], of which the last were of non-commissioned officer rank—as well as of those non-combatants holding officer rank: Regimental Quartermaster, Auditor, and Doctor [Polkovyi Kvartermistr, Auditor i Lekar’]—were exactly like those for non-combatants in Cuirassier and Dragoon regiments (138).

In regard to colors, Hussar regiments had the following distinctions:

In the Pavlograd Regiment:
    For lower ranks—sky-blue pelisse with black fur trim and yellow cords and buttons; dark-green dolman with sky-blue collar and cuffs, yellow cords, and white buttons; dark-green bag on the headdress, while cords and tassels were yellow with sky blue; sky-blue sash with yellow bindings and tassels; the top of the sabertache was dark green with yellow monogram, crown, and smooth trim, and with yellow and sky-blue cord; white saddle cloth with dark-green trim and the same cord, monograms, and crowns as on the sabertache; brass mountings on the saber scabbard (Illus. 1047). For officers—grey fur trim on the pelisse; all cords and buttons gold; eagles on the saddle cloth of dark-green cloth (Illus. 1047)(139). This regiment was the only one whose uniform greatly diverged from the general rules for hussar clothing.

In the Sumy Regiment:
    For lower ranks—sky-blue pelisse; straw-colored dolman with sky-blue collar and cuffs; straw-colored bag on the headdress; all cords and buttons white: sky-blue sash with white bindings and tassels; sky-blue sabertache and saddle cloth, with smooth white trim and monograms (Illus. 1050). For officers—silver appointments; gold cord and eagle on the saddle cloth (140).

In the Mariupol Regiment:
    For lower ranks—blue [sinii] pelisse; white dolman with straw-colored collar and cuffs; white bag on the headdress; all cords and buttons yellow; yellow sash with red bindings and tassels; straw-colored sabertache with smooth white trim and monogram (Illus. 1051); blue saddle cloth with straw-colored trim and yellow monograms. For officers—gold appointments, cords, and eagle on the saddle cloth (141).

In the Aleksandriya Regiment:
    For lower ranks—black pelisse; black dolman with red collar and cuffs; black bag on the headdress; all cords and buttons white; white sash with red bindings and tassels; black sabertache with toothed red trim and monogram; black saddle cloth with white trim and monograms (Illus. 1052);. For officers—silver appointments; gold cords, and monogram on the saddle cloth (142).

In the Izyum Regiment:
    For lower ranks—dark-blue [temnosinii] pelisse; crimson [alyi] dolman with dark-blue collar and cuffs; crimson bag on the headdress; all cords and buttons white; dark-blue sash with white bindings and tassels; crimson sabertache with smooth white trim and monogram; dark-blue saddle cloth with crimson trim and white cord and monograms (Illus. 1053);. For officers—gold appointments; yellow boots; gold cord and eagles on the saddle cloth (Illus. 1053) (143).

In the Akhtyrka Regiment:
    For lower ranks—brown [korichnevyi] pelisse with straw-colored collar and cuffs [i.e. on the dolman – M.C.]; brown bag on the headdress; cords and buttons yellow; yellow sash with white bindings and tassels; brown sabertache with toothed straw-colored trim and yellow monogram (Illus. 1055); brown saddle cloth with straw-colored trim and yellow monograms. For officers—gold appointments (Illus. 1055); gold cord and eagles on the saddle cloth (144).

In the Yelisavetgrad Regiment:
    For lower ranks—straw-colored pelisse; straw-colored dolman with red collar and cuffs; straw-colored bag on the headdress; cords and buttons yellow; red sash with white bindings and tassels; straw-colored sabertache with orange toothed trim and monogram (Illus. 1056); red saddle cloth with orange trim and yellow cord and monograms. For officers—gold appointments; gold cord and eagles on the saddle cloth (145).

In the Olviopol Regiment:
    For lower ranks—dark-green pelisse; dolman, and bag on the headdress; cords and buttons white; red sash with white bindings and tassels; dark-green sabertache with white toothed trim and monogram (Illus. 1056); dark-green saddle cloth with white trim and monograms. For officers—silever appointments; silver cord on the saddle cloth; gold eagles on the saddle cloth corners (146).

5 January 1798 – The stable master and wagon master [shtalmeister i vagenmeister] introduced into the organizational table for Hussar regiments were prescribed uniforms; for the first—as for stable masters in Cuirassier and Dragoon regiments (147), and for the second—as for hussar non-commissioned offices (148). Along with this, the price for hussar horses was established to be 40 roubles (149).

8 Febuary 1798 – Lower ranks in the Pavlograd Hussar Regiment were ordered to have white cords and tassels throughout instead of yellow; buttons were to be yellow, and the saddle cloth light turquoise [svetlo-biryuzovyi], with yellow trim and cord and white monograms. Officers were given the same saddle cloths except with gold cord and eagles (150).

20 August 1798General Major Chorba’s Hussar Regiment, established on this date, was given uniforms as follows: for lower ranks—raspberry pelisse, dolman, and bag on the headdress; all cords and buttons white; raspberry sash with white bindings and tassels; raspberry sabertache and saddle cloth, with white trim and monograms (Illus. 1058). For officers—silver apppointments and cord on the saddle cloth; gold eagles on the saddle cloth corners (Illus. 1058) (151).

31 January 1799 – The hussars’ cloaks were replaced by greatcoats of the same pattern as those for cuirassiers and dragoons (152).

9 October 1799 – Hussar officers were ordered to have raspberry silk on their sword knots and sashes in addition to the black and orange silk (153).

2 March 1800 – The Aleksandriya Hussar Regiment was given the uniform of Gotovitskii’s disbanded regiment, formerly Chorba’s (Illus. 1058) (154).

31 March 1800 – The two Moscow Hussar Squadrons joined to the Akhtyrka Hussar Regiment were ordered to wear the uniform of that regiment (155).

 

 

VII. ARTILLERY.
[
Artilleriya]

 

Upon EMPEROR PAUL I’s ascension to the Throne, Army Artillery (divided into Siege, Field, and Horse) received the same uniforms and arms as the Artillery of the Gatchina troops. At first all changes in these units were done, with HIGHEST permission, by Artillery command itself and later fully entered into tables confirmed by HIGHEST authority on 12 March 1798.

Based on the tables and preceding changes, privates , i.e. bombardiers, cannoneers, and gun handlers [bombardiry, kanoniry i gandlangery] of the Siege [Osadnaya] as well as the Field Artillery [Polevaya Artilleriya], were given a dark-green kaftan coat, without lapels, with as very low standing collar of the same color. The coat had dark-green round cuffs edged, as were the cuff flaps, with red cloth piping; a rend cloth strap on the left shoulder; red kersey lining and flat brass buttons. With this were prescribed: waistcoat and breeches of straw-colored cloth and gaiters of black cloth, all three with brass buttons. For summer there were white breeches of Flemish linen. Greased shoes with blunt toes; red stamin neck cloth with white tape edging and a similar tapes in the back to tie it with; three-cornered hat with white edging, tied with a black woolen cord, brass button and three woolen tassels colored red; dark-green cloth forage cap with or without a band; white cloth cloak with or without a hood [capishon]. For winter, a sheepskin warm coat [fufaika]. Weapons and accouterments consisted of the theshort sword [tesak] prescribed for grenadiers and musketeers, with asword knot with the same different colors as for those regiments; a standard infantry swordbelt; powder flask [porokhovaya natruska] with a whitened cross belt worn over the left shoulder (Illus. 1059); knapsack; water flask; and rusk bag. In the Field Artillery, a horse’s authorized price was 30 roubles (156).

Fireworkers [feierverkery, i.e. non-commissioned officers] and officer candidates [yunkera] were dinstinguished as non-commissioned officers in infantry regiments with gold galloon on cuffs, cuff flaps, and hat; a mix of orange and black silk in the tassels on the hat and sword knot; gloves the same color as the waistcoat; and a cane. Weapons and accouterments for them were all the same as for bombardiers, cannoneers, and gun handlers except for the powder flask, which they were not authorized (Illus. 1059) (157).

Company drummers—a strap on the right shoulder; dark-green wings with red piping and four sewn-on stripes on each sleeve, of white tape with thin black stripes and red and yellow worms [zmeiki, zigzag lines]. Artillery drums had frames or hoops with triangles in two colors: dark green and white. Drum sticks were straw colored (Illus. 1060) (158).

Battalion drummers, and when battalions were combined into regiments—regimental drummers, had in addition to stripes sewn onto the sleeves similar tape on all seams of the coat and all the same distinctions as prescribed for fireworkers and officer candidates (Illus. 1060) (159).

Officers had: kaftan coat, the same as for lower ranks except with convex gilt buttons; straw-colored waistcoat with wide gold galloon; straw-colored breeches; white neck cloth; hat with narrow gold galloon; gaiters;boots; gloves (the same color as the waistcoat); cane; sword [shpaga] with swordknot and sash—all the same as for officers in infantry regiments (Illus. 1061). Field-grade officers wore boots with spurs and had the skirts of their coats turned back (160).

Generals were distinguished from field-grade officers only by their wide galloon and—on the hat— a cockade of black ribbon with orange checks, gold buttonhole loop, and white plumage (161).

Train personnel [furshtatskie] and other non-combatant lower ranks such as: junior train-masters [unter-furmeistery], farriers [konovaly], saddlers [sedel’nyi i shornyi], gun-stock maker [lozhennyi]; smith [kuznechnyi], journeyman metal worker [slesarnyi podmaster], their apprentices, solderer [payal’shchik], carpenters [plotniki], wheelwrights [kolesniki], turners [tokari], joiners [stolyary], train personnel [furleity], and provost [profos], were uninformed following the example of non-combatant ranks in Army infantry regiments. Only junior train-masters had frock coats [sertuki] with gold galloon on the cuffs and cuff flaps, big cavalry boots with bell tops and iron spurs, white gloves, and a cane (Illus. 1062) (162). Train personnel wore the same boots and were authorized, just as were junior train-masters, white cloth valises for riding on horseback (163).

Train officers [furshtatskie ofitsery], namely: Train Masters [Furmeistery], Junior Forage Master [Unter-Furazhmeister], Forage Master [Furazhmeister], and Supply Train Chief [Oboznyi], as well as the Quartermaster [Kvartirmister] and Auditor [Auditor], all had uniforms following the pattern for Quartermasters and Auditors, while the Doctor [Lekar’] followed the example of Doctors in Army regiments (164).

Bombardiers and cannoneers of the Horse Artillery [Konnaya Artillery] had: kaftan coat and waistcoat, identical to those in the foot Artillery except that the first had the skirts turned back;breeches of white cloth and another pair, for summer, of Flemish linen; boots with blunt toes, bell tops, iron spurs, and gaiter cuffs; black clothneck cloth; hat like that for foot artillery; gloves the same straw color as the waistcoat;forage cap of dark-green cloth, with or without a cap band; cloak of white cloth with or without a hood; dragoon broadsword [palash] with an infantry sword knot colored by company, dragoon sword belt and pistol on a white crossbelt with an iron hook, worn over the left shoulder. Additionally, each man was prescribed: knapsack with water flask and rusk bag. Horse furniture consisted of: dragoon saddle with all appurtenences but without holsters; shabrack of dark-green cloth with trim, monogram, and crown of straw-colored cloth (Illus. 1063), and valise, sack, and bag all of the patterns for cuirassiers and dragoons (165). Horse-artillery horses were prescribed to cost 60 roubles (166).

Fireworkers and officer candidates had gold galloon on cuffs, cuff flaps, and hats; tassels on the hat and sword knot had black and orange silk; cane; two pistols secured in holsters in which were places for cartridges, and dark-green cloth pistol holders with the same straw-colored trim, monogram, and crown as for bombardiers and cannoneers (Illus. 1063) (167).

Officers had a kaftan coat and waistcoat that were the same as in the foot Artillery with with turned back skirts; deerskin breeches; boots with bell tops, spurs, and gaiter cuffs; black neck cloth; hat with narrow gold galloon; gloves the same color as the waistcoat; sword [shpaga] identical to the one cuirassier officers wore with the undress coat; sash and cane. In mounted order they had two pistols, a saddle with all its appurtenences, and—of dark-green cloth with gold galloon and similar monograms and crowns—shabrack and pistol holders (Illus. 1064) (168).

Generals, just as in the foot Artillery, wore hats with wide galloon, a cockade, buttonhole loop, and plumage (169).

Train personnel and all other non-combatant ranks were the same as in the foot Artillery with the sole addition of a Stablemaster [Shtalmeister], and were uniformed the same as non-combatants—and the Stablemaster, as Stablemasters—in Cavalry regiments (170).

Musicians, eight in number and authorized only for the senior siege battalion, were uniformed and armed following the example of foot Artillery fireworkders and officer candidates, with the only change being that instead of breeches, gaiters, and shoes, they had jäger chakchiry pants and boots and a belt or sash of hussar pattern made from straw-colored cord with green bindings and two likewise green cords (Illus. 1065) (171).

In Artillery commands [Artilleriiskiya komandy] in Grenadier and Musketeer regiments, bombardiers, cannoneers, fireworkers, officer candidates, officers, and non-combatants (e.g. junior train-masters, medics [fel’dshera], and train personnel—had uniforms, weapons, and accouterments the same as their corresponding ranks in foot Artillery battalions (172).

In the Pioneer Regiment that was included as part of the Artillery, private pioneers [ryadovye pionery] had uniform clothing similar to that for the foot Artillery except that the waistcoat and breeches were orange [oranzhevye]; buttons (on the kaftan coat and waistcoat) were tinned white. Instead of a hat they had a leather cap [shapka] bound with orange cloth on which the frontpiece—4-1/2 vershoks [7-3/8 inches] high, band, and strips on the crown were of English iron, while the small ball at the joining of the strips was of tin (Illus. 1066 and 1067); greatcoat of dark-green cloth, with orange collar and covered buttons; and for trench work and mining operations—a smock [kitel’]. Weapons and accouterments consisted of an infantry short sword [tesak] with a sword knot colored by company; an infantry sword belt without a bayonet frog; pistol kept in a white leather pistol holder [chushka] fixed to the sword belt behind the short sword; infantry cartridge box [podsumka] (Illus. 1066); knapsack, water flask, and rusk bag (173).

Non-commissioned officers and drummers of Pioneer companies were distinguished from private pioneers exactly as officer candidates and fireworkers in the foot Artillery were distinguished from bombardiers, cannoneers, and gun handlers, except that for the first the galloon was silver and gloves white (Illus. 1068), and additionally neither one nor the other were authorized smocks (174).

Sappers and miners and their non-commissioned officers and drummers differed from the corresponding pioneer ranks only in their headdress, which were like grenadier caps, 6-1/4 vershoks [10-7/8 inches] tall, with an iron front piece, band, and strips (Illus. 1069 and 1070) (175).

The regimental drummer was uniformed as the pioneer company drummers except for the prescribed rank distinctions already described above (Illus. 1071) (176).

Officers of the Pioneer Regiment differed from those in the foot Artillery only in having silver buttons and silver gallon on the hat; waistcoat and breeches were orange; gloves white (Illus. 1072) (177).

Non-combatant lower ranks: medic, lazaret attendants, turner, wheelwright, joiner, carpenter, metal worker and apprentice blacksmith, train personnel, and junior train-master—were all uniformed as their counterpart ranks in the Artillery, but with white buttons instead of yellow. However, the Quartermaster, Auditor, and Doctor were no different from those in the Artillery (178).

Pontonniers in Pontoon Depots [pontonery Pontonnykh Depo] were uniformed after the fashion of navy sailors, and wore a kind of short coat called a Dutch frock [Gollandskii bostrog], of dark green cloth with a similar low standing collar, cuffs, cuff flaps, and skirts, with brass buttons; waistcoat (with sleeves) of white cloth, with lapels of white cloth and collar and cuffs of green cloth, and with brass buttons; wide breeches orpants [bryuki], of dark-green cloth, fastened or buttoned under the knees; white (in summer—of thread cloth [nityanye], in winter—of wool) stockings; blunt-toed boots lower than where the pants are tied off; black cloth neck cloth with tape ribbons tied behind; and a Dutch hat, i.e. of black lamb’s wool [poyarkovaya], with a round crown somewhat more narrow at the top, and with a narrow brim bending upwards (Illus. 1073) (179). For summer pontonneers were prescribed a waistcoat of striped ticking (of white with blue) with sleeves, cuffs, and covered buttons down the front, and white canvas [kanifasnyi] pants (Illus. 1074). While working, they wore over the waistcoat a Dutch shirt [Gollandskaya rubakha], likewise of white canvas (Illus. 1074) (180).

Non-commissioned officers in Pontoon Depots wore a dark-green cloth kaftan coat with green cloth cuffs and a low standing collar, with red kersey lining and brass buttons; white cloth waistcoat, also with brass buttons; white cloth breeches [shtany], of calamanco [kalamenko] during the summer; white stockings; short, blunt-toed boots; black neck cloth; three-cornered musketeer hat with three tassels of white, black, and orange worsted, and with narrow gold galloon; white chamois gloves; infantry short sword [tesak] with a white sword knot having an orange and black upper ring [okolysh]; infantry sword belt without a bayonet frog; and a cane (Illus. 1075). Besides this every non-commissioned officer—just as the private pontooneers—were prescribed a forage cap and greatcoat, both of dark-green cloth, sheepskin fufaika coat, knapsack, water flask, and rusk bag (181).

Officers of Pontoon Depots were prescribed the exact same uniforms as officers of foot Artillery except that the waistcoat and pants were white, and instead of gaiters and shoes they wore the same boots as lower ranks (Illus. 1075) (182).

All ranks in the Artillery branches, both artillerymen themselves as well as personnel in the Pioneer Regiment and Pontoon Depots, powdered their hair and had curls and queues, while private pontooneers had only queues, without curls (183).

31 January 1799 – The white cloaks prescribed for foot and horse Artillery were replaced by dark-green greatcoats (184).

9 October 1799 – The knots [shishki] on officers’ sashes, sword knots, and hat tassels, and on lower ranks’ sword knots, were ordered to be colored raspberry, and stripes and tassels were to be in three colors: black, orange, and raspberry (185).

21 October 1801 – Generals and field and company-grade officers in the Artillery who wore spurs were ordered to have these in the same color as their buttons (186).

 

 

 

VIII. CORPS OF ENGINEERS.
[
Inzhenernyi Korpus]

 

24 December 1798Engineer personnel were ordered to have the exact same uniforms and weapons as personnel in the foot Artillery except with white buttons and silver galoon. Accountants [schetnye], ordnance personnel [tseikhdinery], wardens [vakhtery], non-commissioned officers [unter-ofitsery], and draftsmen-artists [konduktory] were uniformed as fireworkers and officer candidates; officers—as officers; and barbers and master craftsmen—as medics and master craftsmen. Doctors [lekarya] were uniformed exactly as doctors throughout the infantry (187).

26 March 1799– Engineer Arsenal Wardens and Junior Arsenal Wardens [Inzhenernye Tseikhvartery i Unter-Tseikhvartery] were ordered to have the same uniforms as infantry Quartermasters (188).

9 October 1799- The knots [shishki] on officers’ sashes, sword knots, and hat tassels, and on lower ranks’ sword knots, were ordered to be colored raspberry, and stripes and tassels were to be in three colors: black, orange, and raspberry (Illus. 1076) (189).

20 April 1800 – Engineer officers were given embroidered silver buttonhole loops [nashivki ili petlitsy] without small tassels, to be sewn onto the coat’s collar and sleeves (190).

 

 

 

IX. GARRISONS.
[
V Garnizone]

 

14 November 1796– The St.-Petersburg Garrison was ordered to have the uniform of the former Gatchina battalion of Colonel Arakcheev, i.e. dark-green kaftan coat with white collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap, and with six buttonhole loops beneath the lapels, on the cuff flaps, and at the waist, of white tape with three rows of red tracery along the middle (Illus. 1077). Waistcoat and pants were white. Officers had a uniform of the same colors, but the coat did not have buttonholes (191).

Based on the Military Regulations [Voinskii Ustav] of 1796 and a HIGHEST confirmed list of colors for garrison uniforms dated 16 February 1797, Garrisons on a field establishment [Garnizony, sostoyavshie na polevom polozhenii]—which is to say St. Petersburg, Moscow, Viborg, Fredrikshamn, Reval, Riga, Archangel, Kazan, Orenburg, Smolensk, Kiev, Taganrog, Tobolsk, Selenginsk, Irkutsk, Baltic, and Dünamünde—were uniformed and armed following the example of Musketeer regiments, namely:

Musketeers had the exact same uniform and weapons as Army musketeers, except for the St.-Petersburg Garrison in which, as already stated above, buttonhole loops were not only on the cuff flaps, but also below the lapels and at the waist (Illus. 1077) (192).

Non-commissioned officers and drummers of Musketeer companies had, in addition to the same features distinguishing them from privates as existed in regiments of Army infantry, black halbard shafts and drumsticks in the two senior regiments of each division, and white ones in all the other regiments (Illus. 1078 and 1079) (193).

Privates of Grenadier companies—at first only in the Riga, Archangel, Orenburg, Selenginsk, and Kiev Garrisons, these as well as their non-commissioned officers, drummers, and fifers had, in relation to these ranks in the Musketeer companies, the same distinctions as existed in Army Musketeer regiments (Illus. 1080 and 1081) (194).

The Regimental drummer, as well as field and company-grade officers, generals, and all noncombatants, such as lazaret orderlies, medics, gun stock maker, metalsmith, gun stock and metalsmith apprentices, company master craftsmen, provosts, and—holding officer rank—the Auditor and Doctor, had uniforms as for these same ranks in the Army infantry (Illus. 1082, 1083, 1084, and 1805). For officers, spontoon shafts were black or white, corresponding to the halberds (195).

Garrisons on the internal establishment [Garnizony, na vnutrennem polozhenii], of which only the Kronstadt had Grenadier companies, were distinguished from those on a field establishment in that they had coats without buttonhole loops, lower rank hats without trim, dark-green waistcoats and pants, and for most regiments—black neck cloths (196). Privates of these Garrisons, except the Kronstadt, had swords [shpagi] with shortsword [tesachnyi] blades (Illus. 1086), bayonets instead of short swords, with the scabbards prescribed for Army grenadiers and musketeers (Illus. 1086), sword belts with frogs, and cartridge pouches without badges (197). Non-commissioned officers had galloon on the collar, cuffs, and cuff flaps; white chamois gloves, canes, swords with shortsword blades; and halberds with white shafts (Illus. 1088) (198). Drummers had sewn-on white tape with a sky-blue worm, and drum hoops that were dark green with white (Illus. 1089 and 1090). Officers wore hats with narrow galloon (Illus. 1091 and 1092) (200), while generals had wide gallon with the addition of a cockade, button loop, and plumage (Illus. 1093) (201). Non-combatant personnel, of the same positions as in Garrisons on a field establishment, differed from noncombatamts in the Army infantry only in having dark-green pants instead of white (202).

Privates or musketeers of the Invalid companies that were part of all Garrisons, those on the internal as well as field establishment, where there were no grenadiers, had: dark-green coat, collar, cuffs, waistcoat, and pants; yellow buttons; red neck cloth; hat without trim, with three dark-green tassels. They had a sword with a shortsword blade, white sword knot, sword belt (Illus. 1094), forage cap, cloak, and warm coat—all the same as throughout the infantry (203).

Invalid non-commissioned officers were distinguished from private invalids by gold galloon on the collar, cuffs, and cuff flaps, and additionally by having the upper ring of the sword knot of black and orange worsted, gloves, and a cane (Illus. 1095) (204).

Invalid drummers had the same tape sewn onto the sleeves, and their drums the same hoops, as in combatant companies (Illus. 1096) (205).

Invalid officers wore hats with trim of narrow gold galloon, and did not have gorgets or spontoons (Illus. 1097) (206).

Invalid medics and lazaret orderlies were uniformed as these same ranks in Garrisons on the internal establishment, with the sole difference of having waistcoats with covered buttons (207).

All garrison and invalid ranks without exception used powder and wore curls and queues (208).

The colors and other distinctions established for Garrisons, with very minor changes as mentioned below, remained the same until 4 March 1800, as follows:

In the St.-Petersburg Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat with white collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; buttonhole loops on the cuff flaps, below the lapels, and at the waist—white with red tracery, without small tassels; white waistcoat and pants; yellow buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1077); drum hoops dark green with white. Officers—coat without buttonhole loops; white neck cloth (209).

In the Moscow Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat with turquoise [biryuzovyi] collar, lapels, cuffs and shoulder strap; yellow buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1077); drum hoops dark-green with turqouise. Officers—gold buttonhole loops, without metallic thread [bit’] or small tassels; white neck cloth (210).

In the Viborg Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or lapels, green cuffs and shoulder strap; white buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with green checks and without small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1078); drum hoops dark-green with green. Officers—silver buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with checkered embroidery, of green silk, without small tassels; white neck cloth (211).

In the Fredrikshamn Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat with turquoise collar, lapels, cuffs and shoulder strap; white buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1078); drum hoops dark-green with turqouise. Officers—silver buttonhole loops, with small tassels, without metallic thread; white neck cloth (212).

In the Reval Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or lapels, turquoise cuffs and shoulder strap; yellow buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth; drum hoops dark-green with turqouise (Illus. 1079). Officers—gold buttonhole loops, without small tassels, with metallic thread; white neck cloth (213).

In the Riga Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or lapels, orange cuffs and shoulder strap; yellow buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth; orange back piece and band on the grenadier cap, with white trim (Illus. 1080); drum hoops dark-green with orange. Officers—gold buttonhole loops, with small tassels, without metallic thread; white neck cloth (214).

In the Archangel Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat with black collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth; orange back piece and band on the grenadier cap, with white trim; drum hoops dark-green with black (Illus. 1081). Officers—silver buttonhole loops, without small tassels or metallic thread; white neck cloth (215).

In the Kazan Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat with light-green collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth; drum hoops dark-green with light green (Illus. 1082). Officers—gold buttonhole loops, without small tassels; white neck cloth (216).

In the Orenburg Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or lapels, raspberry cuffs and shoulder strap; buttonhole loops on the sleeves white with raspberry edging, without small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1082); orange back piece and band on the grenadier cap, with white trim (Illus. 1080); drum hoops dark-green with raspberry. Officers—buttonhole loops silver with red edging, without small tassels; white neck cloth (217).

In the Smolensk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat with straw-colored [palevyi] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels; straw-colored waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth; drum hoops colored dark-green with straw. Officers—buttonhole loops gold, without small tassels or metallic thread; white neck cloth (Illus. 1083) (218).

In the Kiev Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels, red collar, slit cuffs and shoulder strap; white buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels; straw-colored waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth; orange back piece and band on the grenadier cap, with white trim; drum hoops dark-green with red. Officers—silver buttonhole loops on the cuffs, without small tassels; black neck cloth; hat with toothed wide galloon and a cockcade (Illus. 1083) (219).

In the Taganrog Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels, light sky-blue [svetlo-goluboi] collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with small tassels; straw-colored waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth; drum hoops dark-green with light sky-blue. Officers—buttonhole loops on the cuffs silver with sky-blue silk, with small tassels; white neck cloth (Illus. 1083) (220).

In the Tobolsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat with puce [pyusovyi] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels; straw-colored waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1084); drum hoops dark-green with puce. Officers—silver buttonhole loops, without small tassels, with a puce stripe; white neck cloth (221).

In the Selenginsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or lapels, green slit cuffs and shoulder strap; yellow buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with small tassels; straw-colored waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; black neck cloth; straw-colored back piece on the grenadier cap, with white trim, and dark-green band; drum hoops dark-green with green. Officers—gold buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with metallic thread and small tassels; black neck cloth; hat with toothed wide galloon and a cockcade (Illus. 1084) (222).

In the Irkutsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat with puce collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels, with a puce stripe; straw-colored waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth; drum hoops dark-green with puce. Officers—silver buttonhole loops, without small tassels, with a puce stripe; white neck cloth. For all ranks the same uniform clothing as in the Tobolsk garrison (Illus. 1084) (223).

In the Baltic Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or lapels, turquoise cuffs and shoulder strap; yellow buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels; straw-colored waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth; drum hoops dark-green with turquoise. Officers—gold buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with metallic thread; white neck cloth (Illus. 1085) (224).

In the Dünamünde  Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or lapels, orange cuffs and shoulder strap; yellow buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with small tassels; straw-colored waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth; drum hoops dark-green with orange. Officers—gold buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with small tassels, without metallic thread; white neck cloth (Illus. 1085) (225).

In the Kronstadt Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with straw-colored collar, lapels, cuffs and, shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1086); sky-blue back piece on the grenadier cap, trim white with black, and a dark-green band; drum hoops dark-green with white. Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1086) (226).

In the Narva Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with red collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1087). Officers—white neck cloth (227).

In the Yelisavetgrad Garrison, and from 16 December 1798 also in the Kherson Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with camel-colored [verblyuzhii] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1088). Officers—white neck cloth (228).

In the Dimitrii Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with white collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1088). Officers—white neck cloth (229).

In the Azov Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat with pale pink [blednorozovyi] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1088). Officers—black neck cloth (230).

In the Omsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with raspberry collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1089). Officers—black neck cloth (231).

In the Astrakhan Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, sand-colored [pesochnyi] cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1090). Officers—black neck cloth (232).

In the Tsaritsyn Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, with yellow cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1090). Officers—white neck cloth (233).

In the Kizlyar Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or buttonhole loops, with red lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1090). Officers—black neck cloth (234).

In the Schlüsselburg Garrison:
Lower ranks
— coat without cuff flaps or buttonhole loops, with black collar, lapels, slit cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons, including two in the slit of the cuff and three above; black neck cloth. Officers—black neck cloth (Illus. 1091) (235).

In the Villmanstrand Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, with red cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1090). Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1091) (236).

In the Kexholm Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels or buttonhole loops, with puce collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth. Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1091) (237).

In the Nyslott Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with turquoise collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth. Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1092) (238).

In the Arensburg Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels or buttonhole loops, with dark-blue [sinii] collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth. Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1092) (239).

In the Pernau Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or buttonhole loops, with coffee [kofeinyi] lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth. Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1092) (240).

In the Bakhmut Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, with light-violet [svetlo-fioletovyi] cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth. Officers—black neck cloth (Illus. 1093) (241).

In theTambov Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels or buttonhole loops, with red collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth. Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1093) (242).

In the Voronezh Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels or buttonhole loops, with white collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth. Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1093) (243).

In the Vladimir Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with gray collar, cuffs, lapels, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1094). Officers—coat without buttonhole loops; white neck cloth (244).

In the Simbirsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or buttonhole loops, with white lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1095). Officers—black neck cloth (245).

In the Nizhnii-Novgorod Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with black collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1096). Officers—white neck cloth (247).

In the Novgorod Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels or buttonhole loops, with straw-colored collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth. Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1097) (247).

In the Tver Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with yellow collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1098). Officers—black neck cloth (248).

In the Aleksandrovsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with chestnut [kashtanovago sveta] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1099). Officers—black neck cloth (249).

In the Kirilov, later the former Sudakov, Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with pink [rozovyi] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1100). Officers—black neck cloth (250).

In the Petrovsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with dark-green collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1100). Officers—black neck cloth (251).

In the Nikitinsk, later the former Balaklava, Garrison, which still later was transferred to the Corfu fortress:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with sand-colored [pesochnyi] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1100). Officers—black neck cloth (252).

In the Perekop Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels or buttonhole loops, with chestnut collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1101). Officers—black neck cloth (253).

In the Stavropol Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels or buttonhole loops, with yellow collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1102). Officers—black neck cloth (254).

In the Ozernaya, later the former Orsk, Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, with puce cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1103). Officers—black neck cloth (255).

In the Kizilsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, with straw-colored cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1103). Officers—black neck cloth (256).

In the Verkhneuralsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with puce collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1103). Officers—black neck cloth (257).

In the Troitsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, with white cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1104). Officers—black neck cloth (258).

In the Zverinogolovsk Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with light-green collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1104). Officers—black neck cloth (259).

In the Senno, later the former Pskov, Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without lapels or buttonhole loops, with light iron-colored [svetlo-zheleznyi] collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1105). Officers—white neck cloth (260).

In the Dünaburg Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without lapels or buttonhole loops, with orange [oranzhevyi] collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1105). Officers—white neck cloth (261).

In the VitebskGarrison:
Lower ranks—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, with ruby-colored [yakhontovyi] cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1106). Officers—white neck cloth (262).

In the PolotskGarrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without buttonhole loops, with puce collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth. Officers—white neck cloth (Illus. 1106) (263).

In the Mogilev, later the former Rogachev, Garrison:
Lower ranks
—coat without collar or buttonhole loops, with ruby-colored lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1107). Officers—black neck cloth (264).

In the Staryi-Bykhov Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without buttonhole loops, with light iron-colored collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1107). Officers—white neck cloth (265).

In the Tomsk Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without collar or lapels, with gray [dikii] cuffs and shoulder strap; yellow buttons; black neck cloth. Officers—black neck cloth (Illus. 1108) (266).

In the Semipalatinsk Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without lapels, with apricot [abrikosovyi] collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1109). Officers—black neck cloth (267).

In the Biisk Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without buttonhole loops, with dark-blue [sinii] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth. Officers—black neck cloth (Illus. 1110) (268).

In the Petropavlovsk Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, with dark-blue [sinii] cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches. [No information provided on buttons or neck cloth – M.C.] Officers—black neck cloth (Illus. 1110) (269).

In the Mozdok Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without collar, lapels, or buttonhole loops, with chestnut cuffs and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; black neck cloth (Illus. 1111). Officers—black neck cloth (270).

In the Saratov Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without collar or buttonhole loops, with straw-colored lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; dark-green waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth (Illus. 1112). Officers—white neck cloth (271).

In all garrisons beginning with the Kronstadt, drum hoops were dark green with white.

30 September 1797 – Garrison officers were ordered to only have sashes and spontoons when in formation, and not have gorgets. All Garrisons on the internal establishment with dark-green waistcoats and breeches were to wear black baize [baikovyi] neck cloths, without trim (272).

In the Garrison regiments established on a field establishment on 5 January 1798—Rochensalm (Bolotnikov’s), Sevastopol(Chirkov’s), and Nikolaev (Prince Vyazemskii’s)—uniforms were similar to those of other Garrisons on same establishment, with the following distinctions:

In the Rochensalm Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without lapels, with violet collar, slit cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; white buttons, including two in the slit of each cuff; red neck cloth; white back pieces on the grenadier caps, the caps being trimmed orange with dark green, with orange bands (Illus. 1113). Officers—silver embroidered buttonhole loops, with small tassels; white neck cloth (Illus. 1113) (273).
In the Sevastopol Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without lapels, with violet collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow buttonhole loops on the sleeves, with small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; yellow buttons; red neck cloth; white back pieces on the grenadier caps, the caps being trimmed red with dark green, with red bands (Illus. 1114). Officers—gold embroidered buttonhole loops, with small tassels; white neck cloth (Illus. 1114) (274).
In the Nikolaev Garrison:
Lower ranks—coat without collar, with white lapels, slit cuffs, and shoulder strap; buttonhole loops on the sleeves—white with a mix of the color pink, with small tassels; white waistcoat and breeches; white buttons, including two in the slit of each cuff; red neck cloth (Illus. 1115); red back pieces on the grenadier caps, the caps being trimmed white, with dark-blue bands. Officers—silver embroidered buttonhole loops, with a mix of pink color, with small tassels; white neck cloth (Illus. 1115) (275).

In all three Garrisons drum hoops were dark green with white.

In the Garrisons reclassified on 5 January 1798 from an internal to a field establishment, grenadier caps were of the following colors:

In the Narva Garrison—red back pieces and bands; white trim (276).
In the Omsk Garrison—raspberry back pieces; white trim; dark-green bands (277).
In the Kizlyar Garrison—red back pieces; white trim; yellow bands; (278).
In the Schlüsselburg Garrison—apple-green back pieces; yellow trim; dark-green bands (279).
In the Villmanstrand Garrison—white back pieces; orange trim [no information on bands – M.C.] (280).
In the Kexholm Garrison—light-green back pieces and bands; white trim (281).
In the Nyslott Garrison—sky-blue back pieces and bands; white trime (282).
In the Arensburg Garrison—straw-colored back pieces; white trim; pink bands (283).
In the Pernau Garrison—sky-blue back pieces; white trim; dark-green bands (284).
In the Perekop Garrison—orange back pieces and bands; white trim (285).
In the Orsk Garrison—light-green back pieces; white trim and bands (286).
In the Kizilsk Garrison—straw-colored back pieces; white trim; dark-green bands (287).
In the Verkhneuralsk Garrison—raspberry back pieces; white trim; orange bands (288).
In the Troitsk Garrison—white back pieces; trim yellow with black; sky-blue bands (289).
In the Zverinogolovsk Garrison—light-green back pieces; white trim; orange bands (290).
In the Dünaburg Garrison—orange back pieces; white trim and bands (291).
In the Tomsk Garrison—raspberry back pieces; trim yellow with black; dark-green bands (292).
In the Semipalatinsk Garrison—orange back pieces and bands; white trim (293).
In the Biisk Garrison—dark-blue [temnosinii] back pieces and bands; white trim (294).
In the Petropavlovsk Garrison—red back pieces; white trim; dark-blue [sinii] bands (295).
In the Mozdok Garrison—dark-blue [temnosinii] back pieces; white trim; red bands (296).

In the St.-Petersburg, Viborg, Fredrikshamn, Reval, Kazan, Smolensk, Taganrog, Ikrutsk, Baltic, and Dünamünde Garrisons, which although already existing on a field establishment only had Grenadier companies established by the confirmation of organization tables on 5 January 1798, the colors for grenadier caps were as follows:

In the St.-Petersburg Garrison—white back pieces; trim yellow with black; dark-green bands (297).
In the Viborg Garrison—dark-green back pieces; white trim and bands (298).
In the Fredrikshamn Garrison—dark-green back pieces; white trim; red bands (299).
In the Reval Garrison—white back pieces; trim yellow with black; turquoise bands (300).
In the Kazan Garrison—light-green back pieces; white trim; dark-green bands (301).
In the Smolensk Garrison—black back pieces; white trim; red bands (302).
In the Taganrog Garrison—red back pieces and bands; black trim (303).
In the Irkutsk Garrison—straw-colored back pieces and bands; white trim (304).
In the Baltic Garrison—dark-green back pieces; white trim; straw-colored bands (305).
In the Dünamünde Garrison—straw-colored back pieces; white trim; orange bands (306).

Along with this, i.e. on 5 January 1798, the changes in uniform clothing, weapons, and accouterments for Grenadier and Musketeer regiments also were extended to Garrisons. Consequently, the shafts of halbards and spontoons, and drum sticks, were prescribed to be of the following colors:

     In the St.-Petersburg Garrison   —  coffee.
        —   —  Moscow  —   —   white.
        —   —  Viborg  —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Fredrikshamn  —   —   white.
        —   —  Reval  —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Riga —   —   black.
        —   —  Archangel —   —   black.
        —   —  Kazan —   —   black.
        —   —  Orenburg —   —   black.
        —   —  Smolensk —   —   white.
        —   —  Kiev —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Taganrog —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Tobolsk  —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Selenginsk  —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Irkutsk —   —   black.
        —   —  Baltic  —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Dünamünde  —   —   white.
        —   —  Kronstadt  —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Narva  —   —   white.
        —   —  Yelizavetgrad  —   —   white.
        —   —  Dimitrii  —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Azov  —   —   black.
        —   —  Omsk —   —   white.
        —   —  Astrakhan —   —   black.
        —   —  Tsaritsyn  —   —   white.
        —   —  Kizlyar  —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Schlüsselburg  —   —   black.
        —   —  Villmanstrand  —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Kexholm  —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Nyslott  —   —   straw-colored
        —   —  Arensburg  —   —   black.
        —   —  Pernau  —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Bakhmut  —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Tambov —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Voronezh —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Vladimir —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Simbirsk  —   —   black.
        —   —  Nizhnii-Novgorod  —   —   white.
        —   —  Novgorod —   —   white
        —   —  Tver  —   —   black
        —   —  Aleksandrovsk —   —   black.
        —   —  Kirilov  —   —   white.
        —   —  Petrovsk  —   —   white.
        —   —  Nikitinsk  —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Perekop  —   —   black.
        —   —  Stavropol —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Orsk —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Kizilsk  —   —   white.
        —   —  Verkhneuralsk  —   —   white
        —   —  Troitsk  —   —   black
        —   —  Zverinogolovsk  —   —   black.
        —   —  Senno  —   —   black.
        —   —  Dünaburg  —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Vitebsk —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Polotsk  —   —   white.
        —   —  Mogilev —   —   white.
        —   —  Staryi-Bykhov  —   —   black.
        —   —  Tomsk —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Semipalatinsk —   —   black
        —   —  Biisk  —   —   white
        —   —  Petropavlovsk —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Mozdok  —   —   black.
        —   —  Saratov —   —   straw-colored.
        —   —  Rochensalm  —   —   coffee.
        —   —  Sevastopol —   —   white.
        —   —  Nikolaev  —   —   white (307).

In the Nizhne-Kamchatka (Somov’s) regiment, established on 3 October 1798, lower ranks  had: dark-green coat with puce collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttonhole loops on the sleeves, without small tassels; straw-colored waistcoat and breeches; white buttons; red neck cloth; hat with trim (Illus. 1116), and for officers—silver buttonhole loops without small tassels; white neck cloth. In this regiment drum hoops were dark green with white, and non-commissioned officers’ halberd and officers’ spontoons were white (308).

31 January 1799- The white cloaks established by the table of 5 January 1798 were replaced with dark-green greatcoats (309).

9 October 1799 - The knots [shishki] on officers’ sashes, sword knots, and hat tassels, and on lower ranks’ sword knots, were ordered to be colored raspberry, and stripes and tassels were to have three colors: black, orange, and raspberry (310).

4 March 1800 – With the disbanding of Grenadier companies in the Viborg, Fredrikshamn, Reval, Riga, Kazan, Orenburg, Smolensk, Kiev, Taganrog, Irkutsk, Dünamünde, Narva, Astrakhan, Schlüsselburg, Villmanstrand, Kexholm, Nyslott, Arensburg, Pernau, Perekop, Orsk, Kizilsk, Verkhneuralsk, Sevastopol, and Nikolaev Garrisons—grenadier caps in these Garrisons are withdrawn. Afterwards, caps remained only in the Grenadier companies of the Archangel, Kronstadt, Omsk, Tomsk, Selenginsk, Nizhne-Kamchatka, and Gogolev’s (in Corfu) Garrisons. The St.-Petersburg Garrison, as already stated, was disbanded.

4 and 9 March 1800 – In Garrisons, waistcoats and breeches were ordered to be only of one color: white. Those that were dark green or straw colored were withdrawn in all cases, as were lower ranks’ buttonhole loops on cuffs and trim on hats. All personnel were given black neck cloths. Officers were prescribed the exact same uniforms as lower ranks, except that their hats had narrow galloon (311). Based on these changes, coats in Garrison regiments were as follows:

In Marklovskii 2nd’s Regiment (made up of the Narva, Novgorod, Pskov, and Tver Garrisons)—yellow collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (312); i.e., the same as was for the Tver Garrison.

In Plutalov’s Regiment (made up of the Schlüsselburg, Villmanstrand, Kexholm, and Nyslott Garrisons)—black collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow buttons (313); i.e., the saem as was for the Schlüsselburg Garrison but with two buttons on the sleeves instead of five.

In Wrangel’s Regiment (made up of the Viborg and Fredrikshamn Garrisons)—without collar or lapels, with green cuffs and shoulder strap; white buttons (314); i.e., the same as was for the Viborg Garrison but without buttonhole loops.

In Bolotnikov’s Regiment (made up of the Rochensalm and Arensburg Garrisons)—without lapels, with violet collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (315); i.e., the same as was for the Rochensalm Garrison but without buttonhole loops.

In Graf de Castro-Lacerda’s Regiment (made up of the Reval and Pernau Garrisons)—without collar or lapels, with turquoise cuffs and shoulder strap; yellow buttons (316); i.e., the same as was for the Reval Garrison but without buttonhole loops.

In Rautenstern’s Regiment (made up of the Dünamünde, Smolensk, Vitebsk, and Mogilev Garrisons)—straw-colored collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; yellow buttons (317); i.e., the saem as was for the Smolensk Garrison but without buttonhole loops.

In Masse’s Regiment (made up of the Kiev and Kherson Garrisons)—without lapels, with red collar, slit cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (318); i.e., the same as was for the Kiev Garrison but without buttonhole loops and, for officers, with narrow gallon on the hat, without zigzags, instead of wide and toothed.

In Prince Vyazemskii’s Regiment (made up of the Nikolaev, Perekop, and Sevastopol Garrisons)—without a collar, with white lapels, slit cuffs, shoulder strap, and buttons (319); i.e., the same as was for the Nikolaev Garrison but without buttonhole loops.

In Ol’vintsev’s Regiment (made up of the Taganrog, Dimitrii, and Azov garrisons)—with pale pink [blednorozovyi] collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (320); i.e. the same as was for the Azov Garrison.

In L’vov 1st’s Regiment (made up of the Astrakhan, Tsaritsyn, and Simbirsk garrisons)—without collar or lapels, with dark-green cuffs and shoulder strap; white buttons (321); i.e. the same as was in the Astrakhan Regiment but without buttonhole loops.

In Lebedev’s Regiment (made up of the Orenburg, Tambov, and Voronezhgarrisons)—without collar or lapesl, with raspberry cuffs and shoulder strap; white buttons (322); i.e. the same as was for the Orenburg Garrison but without buttonhole loops.

In Gogel’ 1st’s Regiment (made up of the Saratov, Orsk, Zverinogolovsk, and Kizilsk garrisons)—with light-green collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (323); i.e. the same as was for the Zverinogolovsk Garrison.

In Lyutov’s Regiment (made up of the Semipalatinsk, St.-Peter Fortress, Verkhneuralsk, and Troitsk garrisons)—with puce lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (324); i.e. similar to what was for the Verkhneuralsk Garrison but without a collar, with slit cuffs instead of round or sewn together, and with four buttons on the sleeves instead of two (Illus. 1117).

In Retyunskii’s Regiment (made up of the Omsk, Biisk, Tomsk, and Zhelezinsk garrisons)—with raspberry collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (325); i.e. the same as was for the Omsk Garrison.

In Leccano’s Regiment (made up of the Irkutskand Selenginsk garrisons)—with puce collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (326); i.e. the same as was for the Tobolsk and Irkutsk garrisons but without buttonhole loops.

In Pushchin 1st’s Regiment (made up of the Kazan and Tobolsk garrisons)—with light-green collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap (327) [no button information provided – M.C.]; i.e. the same as was for the Kazangarrison.

In Graf Lieven 1st’s Regiment (made up of the Archangel, Vladimir, and Nizhnii-Novgorod garrisons)—with black collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (328); i.e. the same as was for the Tobolsk garrison but without buttonhole loops.

In Arkharov 2nd’s (Moscow)Regiment—with turquoise collar, lapels, and cuffs; yellow buttons (329); i.e. the same as before but without buttonhole loops.

In Bulgakov’s (Riga)Regiment—without collar or lapels, with orange cuffs and shoulder strap; yellow buttons (330); i.e. the same as before but without buttonhole loops.

In Ukolov’s (Kronstadt)Regiment—with straw-colored collar, lapels, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (331); i.e. the same as before.

In Somov’s (Nizhne-Kamchatka) Regiment—with puce collar, cuffs, and shoulder strap; white buttons (332); i.e. as before but without lapels or buttonhole loops. (Illus. 1118).

There was no special direction regarding Gogolev’s Regiment remaining on Corfu, and the new changes were applied only to the Garrisons located within Russia.

In all these regiments beginning with Marklov 2nd’s, drum hoops were dark green with white, while drumsticks, as well as non-commissioned officers’ halberds and officers’ spontoons, kept the colors prescribed by the listing of 5 January 1798 for those Garrisons from which the regiments mentioned here received their uniforms.

 

END OF VOLUME EIGHT.

 

 

NOTES

(11) Pattern and various other cuirassier uniform clothing items from that time preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry (now the Main Intendance Administration [Glavnoe Intendantskoe Upravlenie], in the pattern storehouse of this Administration’s Technical Committee) and in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH'S Own Arsenal; drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177; Military Regulation for Cavalry Service, 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI; HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry for a Cuirassier regiment, 5 January 1798, and statements by contemporaries.

(2) Ditto.

(3) Ditto.

(4) Ditto.

(5) Ditto.

(6) Ditto.

(7) Ditto.

(8) Ditto.

(9) Ditto.

(10) Ditto.

(11) Ditto.

(12) Ditto.

(13) The table referenced in the preceding note; the description of uniforms for Cuirassier and Dragoon regiments confirmed by HIGHEST Authority and an announcement to the Commissariat in February 1797, and a broad sword from those preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.

(14) The table and description of uniforms referenced in the preceding note; Military Regulation for Cavalry Service, 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI, § 4, and model sword knot and sword belt preserved in the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(15) Ditto.

(16) Ditto.

(17) The same table; Military Regulation, 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI, note to § 4, and model pattern sabertache, girdle, and cuirass preserved in the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(18) Ditto.

(19) The same table and a pattern carbine preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.

(20) The same table; Military Regulation of 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI, §§ 9 and 13, and cuirassier shoulder belts and pouches from that time preserved in the personal arsenals of HIS IMPERIAL AND SOVEREIGN MAJESTY and HISIMPERIALHIGHNESSGRANDDUKEMICHAEL PAVLOVICH.

(21) Ditto.

(22) The same table and a pistol from those preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.

(23) The same table; Military Regulation of 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI, §§ 11 and 17; the description of uniforms referenced above in Note 13; actual model items preserved in the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(24) Ditto.

(25) Ditto.

(26) Ditto.

(27) The same table and the Military Regulation of 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI, § 5.

(28) Ditto.

(29) Ditto.

(30) Ditto.

(31) Ditto.

(32) Ditto.

(33) The same table; Military Regulation of 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI, § 15, and pattern uniform for a cuirassier trumpeter, preserved in the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(34) The same table and the Military Regulation of 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI, § 25.

(35) The description of uniforms referenced in Note 13; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos. 162-166; these same numbers in the collection of drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177; uniform items and weapons of Cuirassier officers from that time, preserved in HISIMPERIALHIGHNESSGRANDDUKEMICHAEL PAVLOVICH’S Arsenal; Military Regulation for Cavalry Service, 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI, § 1, and statements by contemporaries.

(36) Ditto.

(37) Ditto.

(38) The description of uniforms referenced in Note 13; the Military Regulation of 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVI, § 4, and statements by contemporaries.

(39) Drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177, and statements by contemporaries.

(40) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for a Cuirassier regiment, 5 January 1798, and statements by contemporaries.

(41) The description of uniforms referenced in Note 13, and statements by contemporaries.

(42) The same description of uniforms; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 162, and this same number in the drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177.

(43) Ibid., No. 163.

(44) Ibid., No. 164.

(45) Ibid., No. 165.

(46) Ibid., No. 166.

(47) Ibid., No. 167.

(48) Ibid., No. 168.

(49) Ibid., No. 169.

(50) Ibid., No. 170.

(51) Ibid., No. 171.

(52) Ibid., No. 172.

(53) Ibid., No. 173.

(54) Ibid., No. 174.

(55) Ibid., No. 175.

(56) Ibid., No. 176.

(57) Ibid., No. 177.

(58) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for a Cuirassier regiment, 5 January 1798.

(59) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 197, and this same number in the drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177.

(60) Ibid., No. 196.

(61) Ibid., No. 198.

(62) HIGHEST Order and contemporary drawings, and actual items with such stars found in HISIMPERIALHIGHNESSGRANDDUKEMICHAEL PAVLOVICH’S Own Arsenal.

(63) Complete Collection of Laws of the Russian Empire [Polnoe Sobranie Zakonov Rossiiskoi Imperii, hereafter PSZ], Vol. XXIV, No 18,837, pg. 548, and statements by contemporaries.

(64) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, Part II, Sect. Four, under information on uniforms page 3, No. 19,178, and statements by contemporaries.

(65) Istoriya Leib-Gvardii Kirasirskago EGO IMPERATORSKAGO VELICHESTVA polka, St. Petersburg, 1833. Page 19 and Note 9.

(66) The description of uniforms referenced in Note 13; pattern and various other dragoon uniform clothing items from that time preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry and in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH'S Own Arsenal; drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177; Military Regulation for Cavalry Service, 29 November 1796, Chapters LXXVI and Chapter LXXIX, § 2; HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry for a Dragoon regiment, 5 January 1798, and statements by contemporaries.

(67) Ditto.

(68) Ditto.

(69) Ditto.

(70) Ditto.

(71) Ditto.

(72) Ditto.

(73) Ditto.

(74) Ditto.

(75) Ditto.

(76) Ditto.

(77) The same sources as indicated in the previous notes 66-76 except for the table of 5 January 1798, which related only to lower ranks.

(78) Ditto.

(79) The same sources as indicated in Notes 66-76.

(80) The description of uniforms reference in Note 13, and statements by contemporaries.

(81) The same description of uniforms; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 178, and this same number in the drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177.

(82) Ditto, No. 179.

(83) The same description of uniforms.

(84) The same description of uniforms; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 181, and this same number in the drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177.

(85) Ditto, No. 182.

(86) Ditto, No. 183.

(87) Ditto, No. 184.

(88) Ditto, No. 185.

(89) Ditto, No. 186.

(90) Ditto, No. 187.

(91) Ditto, No. 188.

(92) Ditto, No. 189.

(93) Ditto, No. 190.

(94) Ditto, No. 191.

(95) Ditto, No. 192.

(96) Ditto, No. 193.

(97) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for a Dragoon regiment, 5 January 1798.

(98) HIGHEST Directive to the Military Collegium; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 180, and this same number in the drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177.

(99) In the same Chronicle and drawings Nos. 199 and 200.

(100) Ditto.

(101) PSZ XXV, No. 18,837, pg. 548, and statements from contemporaries.

(102) PSZ XLIV, Part II, sect. four, under information for uniforms, page 3, No. 19,178, and statements by contemporaries.

(103) HIGHEST Order.

(104) HIGHEST Order.

(105) HIGHEST Order.

(106) Pattern and various other hussar uniform clothing items from that time preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry and in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH'S Arsenal; drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177; HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry for a Hussar regiment, 5 January 1798, and statements by contemporaries.

(107) Ditto.

(108) Ditto.

(109) Ditto.

(110) Ditto.

(111) Ditto.

(112) Ditto.

(113) Ditto.

(114) The table referenced in the preceding note.

(115) The same table and a model hussar saber preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.

(116) The same table and a pattern sword knot preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(117) The same table and contemporary hussar sword belts preserved in various arsenals and by private persons.

(118) The same table; sabertaches preserved in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH'S Own Arsenal, and various drawings of contemporary hussar uniforms, including those in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177.

(119) The same table and a pattern barrel sash preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(120) The same table and a carbine from those preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.

(121) The same table.

(122) The same table and a cartridge pouch preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(123) The same table and a pistol from those preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.

(124) The same table.

(125) The same table; a pattern saddle cloth preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry, and drawings in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177.

(126) The same table.

(127) Ditto.

(128) Ditto.

(129) Military Regulation for Cavalry Service, 29 November 1796, Chapter LXXVII, § 5.

(130) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry for a Hussar regiment, 5 January 1798, and statements from contemporaries.

(131) Ditto.

(132) Ditto.

(133) Ditto.

(134) Actual items that were part of hussar officers’ uniforms and horse furniture at that time, preserved in various arsenals and by private persons; various contemporary drawings, including those in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177, and statements by contemporaries.

(135) Statements by contemporaries and various contemporary drawings.

(136) Ditto.

(137) Ditto.

(138) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry for a Hussar regiment, 5 January 1798, and statements from contemporaries.

(139) HIGHEST confirmed description of the uniform for Major General Baur’s (Pavlograd) Hussar Regiment, 29 November 1798, preserved in the Archive of the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(140) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, and in its associated drawings preserved in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177, No. 247.

(141) Ditto, No. 251.

(142) Ditto, No. 250.

(143) Ditto, No. 249.

(144) Ditto, No. 248.

(145) Ditto, No. 253.

(146) Ditto, No. 254.

(147) Statements by contemporaries.

(148) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry for a Hussar regiment, 5 January 1798.

(149) Ibid.

(150) HIGHEST Directive to the Military Collegium, 8 February 1798, preserved in the Archive of the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(151) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 255, and in the collection of drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 159, between leaves 60 and 61.

(152) PSZ, XXV, No. 18,837, pg. 548.

(153) PSZ, XLIV, Part II, sect. four, under information for uniforms, page 3, No. 19,178, and statements by contemporaries.

(154) HIGHEST Directive preserved in the files of the Archive of the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(155) HIGHEST Order.

(156) Pattern and various other Foot Artillery uniform clothing items from that time preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry and in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH'S Arsenal; drawings of these uniform items held by HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos. 209, 210, 212, 213, 214, 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, and 223; HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry for Siege and Field Artillery battalions, 12 March 1798, and statements by contemporaries.

(157) Ditto.

(158) Ditto.

(159) Ditto.

(160) Ditto.

(161) Ditto.

(162) The table referenced in the preceding note, and statements by contemporaries.

(163) Ditto.

(164) Ditto.

(165) Pattern and various other Horse Artillery uniform clothing items from that time preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry and in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH'S Arsenal; drawings of these uniform items held by HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 211; HIGHEST confirmed table for a Horse-Artillery battalion, 12 March 1798, and statements by contemporaries.

(166) The table referenced in the preceding note.

(167) Pattern and various other Horse Artillery uniform clothing items from that time preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry and in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH'S Arsenal; drawings of these uniform items held by HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library; HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for a Horse-Artillery battalion, 12 March 1798, and statements by contemporaries.

(168) Ditto.

(169) Ditto.

(170) Ditto.

(171) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniform clothing and accouterment items for the musicians authorized in the senior Siege Artillery battalion, 12 March 1798.

(172) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniform clothing and accouterment items for these commands, 12 March 1798.

(173) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for a Pioneer regiment, 24 December 1798; drawings of these uniform items held by HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library, and a model pioneer cap preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(174) The same table.

(175) The same table and a model sapper cap preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(176) The same table.

(177) Drawings of uniforms for pioneer officers, held by HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library.

(178) The table referenced in Note 173, and statements from contemporaries.

(179) HIGHEST confirmed tables of uniform items for sailors of the Baltic and Black-Sea Fleets (1 January 1798), and for the Pontoon command with the Life-Guards Artillery Battalion (10 July 1798); pattern uniform items preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry; drawings of sailors’ uniforms from that time, held by HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library, including those in the book filed under No. 159, and statements from contemporaries.

(180) Ditto.

(181) Ditto.

(182) Drawings of naval officer uniforms whose patterns were also applicable for pioneer officers, located in book No. 159 as referenced in the preceding note, and statements by contemporaries.

(183) HIGHEST confirmed tables of uniform clothing and other items for Artillery battalions (12 March 1798), the Pioneer regiment (24 December 1798), and the Pontoon command with the Life-Guards Artillery Battalion; also, statements from contemporaries and contemporary drawings.

(184) PSZ Vol. XXV, No. 18,837, pg. 348, and statements by contemporaries.

(185) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, Part II, fourth sect., No. 17,987, pg. 301.

(186) Highest Order.

(187) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniform clothing and other items for the Corps of Engineers, 24 December 1798, and statements from contemporaries.

(188) An ukase signed by the Emperor and announced to the Military Collegium in a report by the Inspector of all Artillery.

(189) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, Part II, fourth sect., under information on uniforms, pg. 3, No. 19,178, and statements by contemporaries.

(190) HIGHEST Directive announced to the State Military Collegium by the TSAREVICHAND GRAND DUKEALEXANDERPAVLOVICH, 20 April 1800.

(191) PSZ, Vol. XXIV, No. 17533, pg. 6; pattern coat preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 89, and this same number in drawings held by HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’S Own Library under No. 177.

(192) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for a single Garrison battalion on the field establishment, 5 January 1798, and pattern garrison uniform clothing preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(193) The same table, as well as the Military Regulation of 19 November 1796, Pt. X, Chap. V, note to § 8.

(194) The same table.

(195) The same table; drawings held by HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177; Military Regulation of 29 November 1796, Pt. X, Chap. V, note to § 8.

(196) The drawings mentioned in the previous note.

(197) The same drawings and a HIGHEST confirmed table of uniform, accouterments, and weapons for a single Garrison battalion on the internal establishment, 5 January 1798.

(198) The same table and statements by contemporaries.

(199) The same table and a pattern kaftan coat preserved by the Commissariat Department of the War Ministry.

(200) The drawings referenced in Note 195.

(201) Statements from contemporaries.

(202) The table referenced in Note 197.

(203) The same table and PSZ Vol. XLIV, regulations for uniforms, pg. 5, No. 18,122.

(204) The same table.

(205) Ditto.

(206) Statements from contemporaries.

(207) The table referenced in Note 197.

(208) Ditto.

(209) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 89, and under this same number in the drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177.

(210) Ibid., No. 94.

(211) Ibid., No. 102.

(212) Ibid., No. 103.

(213) Ibid., No. 109.

(214) Ibid., No. 108.

(215) Ibid., No. 95.

(216) Ibid., No. 138.

(217) Ibid., No. 140.

(218) Ibid., No. 115.

(219) Ibid., No. 121.

(220) Ibid., No. 135.

(221) Ibid., No. 154.

(222) Ibid., No. 148.

(223) Ibid., No. 147.

(224) Ibid., No. 110.

(225) Ibid., No. 111.

(226) Ibid., No. 90.

(227) Ibid., No. 92.

(228) Ibid., No. 122.

(229) Ibid., No. 134.

(230) Ibid., No. 133.

(231) Ibid., No. 149.

(232) Ibid., No. 136.

(233) Ibid., No. 137.

(234) Ibid., No. 132.

(235) Ibid., No. 91.

(236) Ibid., No. 104.

(237) Ibid., No. 105.

(238) Ibid., No. 106.

(239) Ibid., No. 113.

(240) Ibid., No. 112.

(241) Ibid., No. 124.

(242) Ibid., No. 100.

(243) Ibid., No. 99.

(244) Ibid., No. 97.

(245) Ibid., No. 101.

(246) Ibid., No. 98.

(247) Ibid., No. 93.

(248) Ibid., No. 96.

(249) Ibid., No. 125.

(250) Ibid., No. 130.

(251) Ibid., No. 126.

(252) Ibid., No. 129.

(253) Ibid., No. 127.

(254) Ibid., No. 146.

(255) Ibid., No. 141.

(256) Ibid., No. 142.

(257) Ibid., No. 143.

(258) Ibid., No. 144.

(259) Ibid., No. 145.

(260) Ibid., No. 116.

(261) Ibid., No. 114.

(262) Ibid., No. 118.

(263) Ibid., No. 117.

(264) Ibid., No. 119.

(265) Ibid., No. 120.

(266) Ibid., No. 150.

(267) Ibid., No. 151.

(268) Ibid., No. 152.

(269) Ibid., No. 153.

(270) Ibid., No. 131.

(271) Ibid., No. 139.

(272) PSZ, Vol. XXIV, No. 18,173, pg. 754.

(273) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 107, and under this same number in the drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library under No. 177.

(274) Ibid., No. 128.

(275) Ibid., No. 123.

(276) Ibid., No. 92.

(277) Ibid., No. 149.

(278) Ibid., No. 132.

(279) Ibid., No. 91.

(280) Ibid., No. 104.

(281) Ibid., No. 105.

(282) Ibid., No. 106.

(283) Ibid., No. 113.

(284) Ibid., No. 112.

(285) Ibid., No. 127.

(286) Ibid., No. 141.

(287) Ibid., No. 142.

(288) Ibid., No. 143.

(289) Ibid., No. 144.

(290) Ibid., No. 145.

(291) Ibid., No. 114.

(292) Ibid., No. 150.

(293) Ibid., No. 151.

(294) Ibid., No. 152.

(295) Ibid., No. 153.

(296) Ibid., No. 131.

(297) Ibid., No. 89.

(298) Ibid., No. 102.

(299) Ibid., No. 103.

(300) Ibid., No. 109.

(301) Ibid., No. 138.

(302) Ibid., No. 115.

(303) Ibid., No. 135.

(304) Ibid., No. 147.

(305) Ibid., No. 110.

(306) Ibid., No. 111.

(307) Ibid., Nos. 89-154.

(308) Drawings of garrison uniforms in 1800, located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library in portfolio No. 295, and Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 155.

(309) PSZ, Vol. XXV, No. 18,837, pg. 548, and statements by contemporaries.

(310) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, Part II, fourth sect., under information on uniforms, pg. 3, No. 19, 178, and statements by contemporaries.

(311) Drawings of garrison uniforms in 1800, located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY'S Own Library in portfolio No. 295, and HIGHEST ORDER, 4 March 1800.

(312) Ditto.

(313) Ditto.

(314) Ditto.

(315) Ditto.

(316) Ditto.

(317) Ditto.

(318) Ditto.

(319) Ditto.

(320) Ditto.

(321) Ditto.

(322) Ditto.

(323) Ditto.

(324) Ditto.

(325) Ditto.

(326) Ditto.

(327) Ditto.

(328) Ditto.

(329) Ditto.

(330) Ditto.

(331) Ditto.

(332) Ditto.

 

END OF NOTES TO VOLUME EIGHT.