HISTORICAL DESCRIPTION
OF THE
CLOTHING AND ARMS
OF THE
RUSSIAN ARMY

  

VOLUME 30

 
Irregular Troops, Temporary Forces, Flags, Orders, and Medals

1825-1855

 

A.V. VISKOVATOV

 

Compiled by HIGHEST direction

Saint Petersburg, Military Typography Office, 1862 

   

 

[TRANSLATED BY MARK CONRAD, 2012] 

 ------------------------------

 

Changes in the uniform and arms of the army from 20 November, 1825, to 18 February, 1855: 

 

CONTENTS

List of Illustrations.

LXXX. Changes in the uniform and arms of cossack and other irregular forces.

     III. Caucasian Line Cossack Host.

     IV. Astrakhan Cossack Host.

     V. Ural Cossack Host.

     VI. Orenburg Cossack Host.

     VII. Teptyar Regiments.

     VIII. Stavropol Kalmuck Host.

     IX. Bashkir-Meshcheryak Host.

     X. Siberian Line Cossack Host.

     XI. Siberian Town Cossacks and Border Troops.

     XII. Little-Russian Cossack Regiments.

     XIII. Danube Cossack Host.

     XIV. Azov Cossack Host.

     XV. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron.

     XVI. Balaklava Greek Infantry Battalion.


LXXXI. Changes in the uniforms and arms of temporary forces.

LXXXII. Flags and standards.

LXXXIII. Order ribbons and metal bands for flags and standards.

LXXXIV. Orders and medals.


Notes.

 

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

 

1194. Cossacks. Terek Family and Khoper Cossack Regiments, 1831-1834.

1195. Non-commissioned Officers. Mountaineer and Grebensk Cossack Regiments. 1831-1834.

1196. Company-Grade Officers. Kuban and Volga Cossack Regiments, 1831-1834.

1197. Field-Grade Officers. Mozdok and Kizlyar-Terek Cossack Regiments, 1831-1834.

1198. Cossacks. Caucasian and Kuban Cossack Regiments, 1834-1845.

1199. Non-Commissioned Officers. Stavropol and Khoper Cossack Regiments. 1834-1845.

1200. Company-Grade Officers. Volga and Mountaineer Cossack Regiments, 1834-1845.

1201. Field-Grade Officers. Mozdok and Grebensk Cossack Regiments, 1834-1845.

1202. Cossack, Terek Cossack Regiment, and Company-Grade Officers, Kizlyar Cossack Regiment. 1834-1836.

1203. Field-Grade Officer. Stavropol Cossack Regiment. 1843-1845.

1204. Cossack, Laba Cossack Regiment, and Non-Commissioned Officer, Vladikavkaz Cossack Regiment. 1843-1845.

1205. Cossacks. Caucasian Cossack Regiments, 1845-1855.

1206. Field-Grade Officers. Kuban and Laba Cossack Regiment, 1845-1855.

1207. Non-Commissioned Officers. Stavropol and Khoper Cossack Regiments, 1845-1855.

1208. Cossacks. Volga and Mountain Cossack Regiments. 1845-1855.

1209. Company-Grade Officers. Mozdok and Grebensk Cossack Regiments, 1845-1855.

1210. Company-Grade Officer, Vladikavkaz Cossack Regiment, and Cossack, Kizlyar Family Cossack Regiment, 1845-1855.

1211. Cossack. 1st Sunzha Cossack Regiment, 1847-1855.

1212. Company-Grade Officer and Cossack. 1st Caucasian Cossack Foot Battalion, 1849-1855.

1213. Company-Grade Officer and Horseman, Daghestan Irregular Horse Regiment, 1851-1855.

1214. Cossack. Artillery of the Caucasian Line Cossack Host, 1845-1855.

1215. Company-Grade Officer and Non-Commissioned Officer. Artillery of the Caucasian Cossack Line, 1845-1855.

1216. Non-Commissioned Officer. Astrakhan Cossack Hosts, 1829-1838.

1217. Company-Grade Officer. Astrakhan Cossack Host, 1829-1838.

1218. Non-Commissioned Officer and Cossack. Astrakhan Cossack Host, 1838-1845.

1219. Field-grade Officer. Astrakhan Cossack Host, 1838-1845.

1220. Cossack. Astrakhan Cossack Host, 1845-1855.

1221. Company-Grade Officer. Astrakhan Cossack Host, 1845-1855.

1222. Cossack. Astrakhan Cossack Artillery, 1829-1838. (Later the yellow stripe on the pants was changed to red).

1223. Non-commissioned Officer. Astrakhan Cossack Artillery, 1838-1845. (Later the yellow stripe on the pants was changed to red).

1224. Cossack. Ural Cossack Host, 1829-1838.

1225. Field-grade Officer. Ural Cossack Host, 1829-1838.

1226. Non-Commissioned Officer. Ural Cossack Host, 1838-1845.

1227. Company-Grade Officer. Ural Cossack Host, 1845-1855.

1228. Cossack. Leib-Ural Cossack Sotnia, 1826-1828.

1229. Company-Grade Officer. Leib-Ural Cossack Sotnia, 1826-1829.

1230. Non-Commissioned Officer. Leib-Ural Cossack Sotnia, 1828-1838.

1231. Private. L.-Gds. Ural Cossack Sotnia, 1838-1845.

1232. Field-grade Officer. L.-Gds. Ural Cossack Sotnia, 1838-1845.

1233. Non-Commissioned Officer. rivate. L.-Gds. Ural Cossack Sotnia, 1845-1855.

1234. Field-grade Officer and Private. L.-Gds. Ural Cossack Double-Squadron, 1848-1855.

1235. Cossack and Field-Grade Officer. Orenburg Cossack Host, 1829-1838.

1236. Cossack. 1st Orenburg Cossack Regiment, 1835-1838.

1237. Company-Grade Officer. 1st Orenburg Cossack Regiment, 1835-1838.

1238. Noncombatant. 1st Orenburg Cossack Regiment, 1835-1842.

1239. Company-Grade Officer. Orenburg Cossack Host, 1838-1840.

1240. Cossack. 1st Orenburg Cossack Regiment, 1838-1845.

1241. Mounted Cossack. Orenburg Cossack Host, on internal service, 1843-1845.

1242. Foot Cossack. Orenburg Cossack Host, on internal service, 1843-1855.

1243. Field-Grade Officer. Noncombatant Company of the Ufa Cossack Regiment, 1844-1845.

1244. Non-Commissioned Officer. Orenburg Cossack Host, 1845-1855.

1245. Field-Grade Officer and Cossack. Foot Battalions of the Orenburg Cossack Host, 1854-1855.

1246. Cossack. Orenburg Cossack Artillery, 1829-1838.

1247. Non-Commissioned Officer. Teptyar Cossack Regiments, 1829-1835.

1248. Field-Grade Officer. Teptyar Cossack Regiments, 1829-1835.

1249. Cossack. Stavropol Kalmuck Host, 1829-1838.

1250. Company-Grade Officer. Stavropol Kalmuck Host, 1829-1832.

1251. Field-Grade Officer. Stavropol Kalmuck Host, 1832-1838.

1252. Non-Commissioned Officer. Stavropol Kalmuck Host, 1838-1842.

1253. Cossack. Bashkir Cantons, 1829-1838.

1254. Non-Commissioned Officer. Bashkir Cantons, 1829-1838.

1255. Company-Grade Officer. Bashkir Cantons, 1829-1838.

1256. Non-Commissioned Officer. Meshcheryak Cantons, 1829-1838.

1257. Company-Grade Officer. Meshcheryak Cantons, 1829-1838.

1258. Non-Commissioned Officer and Field-Grade Officer. Bashkir Cantons, 1838-1845.

1259. Cossack. Meshcheryak Cantons, 1838-1845.

1260. Company-Grade Officer. Bashkir Cantons, 1845-1855.

1261. Company-Grade Officer and Cossack. Meshcheryak Cantons, 1845-1855.

1262. Cossack and Non-Commissioned Officer. Siberian Line Cossack Host, 1829-1838.

1263. Company-Grade Officer. Siberian Line Cossack Host, 1829-1838.

1264. Cossack and Field-Grade Officer. Siberian Line Cossack Host, 1838-1840.

1265. Field-Grade Officer and Non-Commissioned Officer. Siberian Line Cossack Host, 1840-1845.

1266. Cossack. Siberian Line Cossack Host, 1845-1855.

1267. Field-Grade Officer. Siberian Line Cossack Host, 1845-1855.

1268. Non-Commissioned Officer. Siberian Line Cossack Artillery, 1829-1838.

1269. Non-Commissioned Officer and Cossack. Siberian Town Cossacks and Border Troops, 1829-1853.

1270. Cossack. Siberian Town Cossacks and Border Troops, 1829-1853.

1271. Field-Grade Officer. Siberian Town Cossacks and Border Troops, 1829-1853.

1272. Cossack. Yakutsk Town Cossack Regiment of Foot, 1840-1853.

1273. Noncombatant. Yakutsk Town Cossack Regiment of Foot, 1842-1853.

1274. Cossack, Tobolsk Foot Cossack Battalion, and Field-Grade Officer, Tobolsk Horse Cossack Regiment. 1852-1855.

1275. Field-Grade Officer, Irkutsk Horse Cossack Regiment, and Non-Commissioned Officer, Yeniseisk Horse Cossack Regiment. 1853-1855.

1276. Field-grade Officer and Cossack. Foot Battalions of the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host, 1853-1855.

1277. Cossack. Russian horse regiments of the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host, 1853-1855.

1278. Cossack. Little-Russian Cossack Regiments, 1831-1838.

1279. Company-Grade Officer. Little-Russian Cossack Regiments, 1831-1838.

1280. Non-Commissioned Officer. Little-Russian Cossack Regiments, 1838-1842.

1281. Cossack. Danube Cossack Host. 1837-1838.

1282. Field-Grade Officer. Danube Cossack Host, 1837-1838.

1283. Cossack. Danube Cossack Host. 1844-1845.

1284. Field-Grade Officers. Danube Cossack Host, 1844-1845.

1285. Mounted Cossack. Danube Cossack Host, on internal service, 1844-1845.

1286. Dismounted Cossack. Danube Cossack Host, on internal service, 1844-1855.

1287. Cossack. Danube Cossack Host. 1845-1855.

1288. Company-Grade Officer. Danube Cossack Host. 1845-1855.

1289. Cossack. Azov Cossack Host, 1833-1838.

1290. Company-Grade Officer. Azov Cossack Host, 1833-1838.

1291. Field-Grade Officer. Azov Cossack Host, 1838-1841.

1292. Cossack. Azov Cossack Host, 1841-1845.

1293. Non-Commissioned Officer. Azov Cossack Host, 1841-1845.

1294. Company-Grade Officer. Azov Cossack Host, 1841-1845.

1295. Cossack. Azov Cossack Host, 1845-1855.

1296. Field-Grade Officer. Azov Cossack Host, 1851.

1297. Company-Grade Officer. Azov Cossack Host, 1852-1855.

1298. Private. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1827.

1299. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1827.

1300. Officer’s saddlecloth, L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron. Established 15 July 1827.

1301. Privates. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1827-1830.

1302. Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1827-1838.

1303. Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1830-1838.

1304. Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1838-1845.

1305. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1838-1845.

1306. Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1845-1855.

1307. Private. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1845-1855.

1308. Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1845-1855.

1309. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron, 1845-1855.

1310. Private. Balaklava Greek Infantry Battalion, 1830-1855.

1311. Non-Commissioned Officer. Balaklava Greek Infantry Battalion, 1830-1855.

1312. Company-Grade Officer. Balaklava Greek Infantry Battalion, 1830-1855.

1313. Company-Grade Officer and Hornist. Imperial Family Rifle Regiment, 1854-1855.

1314. Rifleman and Non-Commissioned Officer. Imperial FamilyRifle Regiment, 1854-1855.

1315. Ratnik and Drummer. Government Mobile Mass Levy [opolchenie], 1855.

1316. Non-Commissioned Officer and Company-Grade Officer. Government Mobile Mass Levy, 1855.

1317. Drawings from which the flags for Carabinier regiments were made since 1826.
a) 1st Grenadier Division; b) 2nd Grenadier Division; c) 3rd Grenadier Division and the Erivan Carabinier Regiment; d) Nesvizh Carabinier Regiment.
1318. Drawings from which the flags for Jäger regiments were made since 1826.
a) First Jäger regiments in brigades, except in the Separate Lithuanian Corps; b) First Jäger regiments in brigades in the Separate Lithuanian Corps; c) Second Jäger regiments in brigades, except in the Separate Lithuanian Corps; d) Second Jäger regiments in brigades in the Separate Lithuanian Corps.
Note: The flags in b) and d), until 1831, had a Lithuanian horseman in the eagle’s shield.
1319. Drawings of standards, from which flags for Army Cavalry regiments were made since 1826.
a) For all regiments except those in the Lithuanian Lancer Division ; b) For regiments in the Lithuanian Lancer Division.
1320. Drawings from which the flags for Sapper and Pioneer battalions were made:
a) Instructional Sapper Battalion in 1827 ; b) Grenadier Sapper Battalion in 1828 and 1829; c) Pioneer and Sapper battalions, except the Instructional, Grenadier, and Lithuania battalions, since 1828; d) Lithuania Pioneer Battalion in 1828
Note: Up to 1831 the flag in drawing d) had an image of a Lithuanian horseman in the eagle’s shield.

1321. Drawing from which the flags Line battalions were made since 1829.

1322. Flags granted to battalions:
a) 2nd Battalion, L.-Gds. Jäger Regiment, in 1828 ; b) L.-Gds. Sapper Battalion in 1828; c) 2nd Battalion, L.-Gds. Lithuania Regiment, in 1832; d) 2nd Battalion, L.-Gds. Volhynia Regiment, in 1832.
Note: In 1830 the spearheads on the flag poles in drawings a) and b) were replaced by the eagles shown in drawings c) and d), but gilded.
1323. Flags granted to battalions:
a) L.-Gds. Finnish Rifle Battalion, in 1829 ; b) the same, in 1831; c) L.-Gds. Garrison Battalion, in 1827.
1324. Standards granted to Guards cavalry units:
a) L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, in 1827 ; b) L.-Gds. Horse-Pioneer Squadron, in 1826.

1325. Standard granted to the 3rd Double-Squadron [divizion] of the L.-Gds. Grodno Hussar Regiment in 1832.

1326. Flag and standard granted to Model regiments in 1836:
a) Infantry ; b) Cavalry.
1327. Flags granted to Instructional Carabinier regiments:
a) 2nd Instructional Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions in 1832, and 3rd Instructional Carabinier Regiment, the same battalions, in 1837 ; b) 2nd Instructional Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions; c) 1st Instructional Carabinier Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions; d) 4th Instructional Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions. All the last seven in 1837.
1328. Flags granted to Military Educational institutions:
a) Imperial Military Orphans’ Home, in 1826 ; b) Moscow Cadet Corps, in 1827; c) 1st Cadet Corps, in 1832.
Note: in 1830 the spearheads on the flag poles in drawings a) and b) were replaced by eagles of the type shown in drawing c).
1329. Flags granted to Cadet Corps:
a) Graf Arakcheev’s Novgorod Cadet Corps, 29 October 1827 ; b) Polotsk Cadet Corps, 29 October 1827; c) Graf Arakcheev’s Novgorod Cadet Corps, 9 May 1844.
1330. Flags granted to Cadet Corps:
a) 1st Moscow Cadet Corps, 9 May 1844 ; b) Polotsk Cadet Corps, 9 May 1844; c) Peter-Poltava Cadet Corps, 27 June 1844.
1331. Flags granted to: a) the Don Host in 1832; b) in 1849, and; c) Don No. 1 Regiment in 1850.

1332. Flag granted to Don No. 38 Regiment in 1845.

1333. Flags granted to:
a) Black Sea Cossack Host in 1843 ; b) Black-Sea No. 1 Horse Regiment in 1831; c) Black-Sea Nos. 5 and 6 Horse Regiments in 1844.
1334. Flags granted to:
a) Black-Sea Nos. 8 and 9 Horse Regiments in 1844 ; b) Black-Sea No. 1 Foot Battalion in 1844; c) Black-Sea Nos. 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 9 Foot Battalions in 1845; d) Nos. 5 and 8 Battalions in 1844.
1335. Flags granted to:
a) 1st Caucasian, 1st and 2nd Laba, 1st and 2nd Stavropol, 1st Khoper, 1st Volga, and the Vladikavkaz Regiments in 1851 ; b) 2nd Caucasian, 2nd Kuban, 2nd Khoper, 2nd Volga, Mountain, Mozdok, Grebentsk, and Kizlyar Regiments in 1831; c ) Sunzha Regiment in 1850.

1336. Flag granted to the Azov Cossack Host in 1844.

1337. Flags granted to ten Horse regiments of the Orenburg Cossack Host in 1842.

1338. Flags granted to:
a) Caucasian Composite Irregular Regiment, consisting of Combined Line Cossak-Caucasian Horse-Moutaineer double-squadrons, and b) Trans-Caucasus Horse-Musulman Regiment in 1849.
1339. Flags granted to:
a) Georgian Foot Druzhina in 1854, and b) People of Imeretia in 1839.
1340. Flags granted to:
a) Georgian Mass Levy [Opolchenie] in 1842, and b) Georgian Volunteer Horse Druzhinain 1854.
1341. Flags granted to:
a) Samurzakan tribe in 1841, and b) Inhabitants of Kabarda in 1844.
1342. Flags granted to:
a) Kazikumyk Foot Militia and b) Kazikumyk Horse Militia, in 1845.
1343. Flags granted to:
a) Akhta Foot Militia and b) Shirvan Horse Militia in 1845.
1344. Flags granted to:
a) Kuban and b) Kazikumyk warriors [nukery] in 1845.
1345. Flags granted to:
a) Nazran inhabitants and b) Dzhiget people in 1845.

1346. Flag granted to the Ossetians of the Vladikavkaz district in 1845.

1347. Flags for the Khora Buryats, seven red and seven sky blue, granted in 1837.

1348. Ten flags granted for the Buryats of the Oginsk administration in 1842 and fifteen for the Buryats of the Selenginsk administration in 1845.

1349. Order ribbon and band for flags of the L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii Regiment, established 25 June 1838.

1350. HIGHEST personal monograms confirmed for Order ribbons and bands, established 25 June 1838.

1351. Badges for distinction for irreproachable service, since 1827: a) for military officers; b) for civilian officials. Medals for officers and lower ranks: c) for the Persian war of 1826, 1827, and 1828, and d) for the Turkish war of 1828 and 1829.

1352. a) Medal for officers and lower ranks, for the taking of Warsaw by storm in 1831. Crosses for the Polish war: b) for officers and c) for lower ranks.

1353. Imperial and Tsarist order of the White Eagle.

1354. Imperial and Tsarist order of St. Stanislav: a) 1st class, b) 2nd class, and c) 3rd class.

1355. Medals for officers and lower ranks: a) for the taking of Akhulgo by storm, 1839, and b) for the pacification of Hungary and Transylvania in 1849.

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Chapter LXXIX (continued).

III. The Caucasian Line Cossack Host.
[Kavkazskoe lineinoe kazache voisko.]

 REGIMENTS

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars [kovanye zvezdochki] are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (1).

7 August 1829 - Epaulettes on officers’ uniforms are to have scaled fields [cheshuichatoe pole] like the pattern of epaulettes in the regular light cavalry (2).

16 January 1831 - For regiments of the Caucasian Line Cossack Host without prescribed uniforms, there are introduced: half-caftan, or cherkeska, as an outer garment [verkhnee polukaftan'e ili cherkska], without collar or cuffs, trimmed around with black tape, with two cartridge-holders on the breast [nagrudnye patronniki] of green morocco leather, and two sholder straps; a caftan, or beshmet, worn underneath [nizhnii kaftan ili beshmet]; narrow pants; headdress with a round cloth crown with a wide brim of black sheep’s fleece; narrow leather belt; shashka or saber [shashka ili sablya] in a black leather scabbard, dagger, musket, and pistol. Officers are prescribed the same uniform but with narrow silver galloon instead of tape and with silver scaled epaulettes, which are allowed not to be worn when in operations against the enemy.

Uniform colors are designated as follows: In the Terek Family Regiment—very dark-blue [temnosinii] cherkesa and pants, red beshmet and headdress, red shoulders straps with the No. 1 (Illus. 1194). In the Khoper Regiment—very dark-blue cherkeska and pants, white beshmet and headdress, white shoulder straps with the No. 1 (Illus. 1194). In the Mountaineer Regiment—very dark-blue cherkeska and pants, yellow beshmet and headdress, sky-blue shoulder straps with the No. 1 (Illus. 1195). In the Grebensk Regiment—very dark-blue cherkeska and pants, sky-blue [goluboi] beshmet and headdress, sky-blue shoulder straps with the No. 1 (Illus. 1195). In The Kuban Regiment—dark-brown [temnokorichnevyi] cherkeska and pants, red beshmet and headdress, red shoulder straps with the No. 2 (Illus. 1196). In the Volga Regiment—dark-brown cherkeska and pants, white beshmet and headdress, white shoulder straps with the No. 2 (Illus. 1196). In the Mozdok Regiment—dark-brown cherkeska and pants, yellow beshmet and headdress, yellow shoulder straps with No. 2 (Illus. 1197). In the Kizlyar-Terek Regiment—dark-brown cherkeska and pants, sky-blue beshmet and headdress, sky-blue shoulder straps with the No. 2 (Illus. 1197) (3).

April 1831 - Officers without permanent positions [za-uryad-ofitsery] are to have small forged and stamped stars on their epaulettes like those introduced on 1 January 1827 to distinguish rank (4).

21 May 1834 - The following colors are prescribed for the uniforms of the Caucasian Line Cossack Host:

Caucasian Regiment—very dark-blue cherkeska and pants; beshmet and headdress red, red shoulder straps with the No. 1 in yellow (Illus. 1198).

Kuban—very dark-blue cherkeska and pants, white beshmet and headdress, white shoulder straps with the No. 1 in red (Illus. 1198).

Stavropol—very dark-blue cherkeska and pants, yellow beshmet and headdress, yellow shoulder straps with the No. 1 in red (Illus. 1199).

Khoper—very dark-blue cherkeska and pants, light-blue [svetlosinii] beshmet and headdress, light-blue shoulder straps with the No. 1 in red (Illus. 1199).

Volga—very dark-blue cherkeska and pants, light-green beshmet and headdress, light-green shoulder straps with No. 1 in red (Illus. 1200).

Mountaineer—dark-brown cherkeska and pants, red beshmet and headdress, red shoulder straps with the No. 2 in yellow (Illus. 1200).

Mozdok—dark-brown cherkeska and pants, white beshmet and headdress, white shoulder straps with No. 2 in red (Illus. 1201).

Grebensk—dark-brown cherkeska and pants, yellow beshmet and headdress, yellow shoulder straps with the No. 2 in red (Illus. 1201).

Terek—dark-brown cherkeska and pants, light-blue beshmet and headdress, light-blue shoulder straps with the No. 2 in red (Illus. 1202).

Kizlyar—dark-brown cherkeska and pants, light-green beshmet and headdress, light-green shoulder straps with No. 2 in red (Illus. 1202). It is ordered that officers’ uniforms be distinguished from lower ranks’ by silver galloon and silver scaled epaulettes lined with red cloth; the headdress has silver galloon with a black brim (5).

28 July 1836 - The Kizlyar Family Regiment [Semeinyi-Kizlyarskii polk], formed from the Terek and Kizlyar Cossack Regiments, is prescribed the uniform of the former Terek Regiment (6).

8 April 1843 - In the Caucasian Line Cossack Host it is ordered that officers’ greatcoats have standing collars of the color prescribed for the collar of the arkhaluk in each regiment; buttons are white (Illus. 1203) (7).

2 October 1843 - The Laba and Vladikavkaz Cossack Regiments are prescribed uniforms: Laba—of dark blue [sinii] with an orange arkhaluk; shoulder straps and top of the headdress of the same color (Illus. 1204). Vladikavkaz—of brown with a green arkhaluk; shoulder straps and headdress top of the same color (Illus. 1204) (8).

14 February 1843 - By a confirmed Regulation the regiments of the Caucasian Line Cossack Host are prescribed the following uniforms, weapons, and horse furniture.

1st and 2nd Caucasian Regiments.

For cossacks.

Half-round headdress, the top (bashlyk) of red cloth, the brim of shaggy black kurnei, chinstrap of black silk tape. Coat (cherkeska) of dark-blue cloth, without collar or cuffs, reaching to 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] below the knees, closed by small hooks from the cartridge-holders to the belt. Red beshmet for the coat, stamin, 1 vershok [1-3/4 inches] shorter than the coat. Black cartridge-holders on the coat, of leather, with inside pockets lined with black lace and black cord; birch tubes [vtulki berezovye] with white bone caps. Each cartridge-holder holds 8 cartridges. Red shoulder straps, of cloth with the punched-out designation of the regiment: 1 K (first Caucasian), 2 K (second Caucasian). Dark-blue cloth pants with small leather straps at the feet. Red woollen pistol lanyard. Cloth pistol holder, the upper part red and the lower dark blue. In place of a greatcoat—a Caucasian burka [fur cape - M. C.]. Girdle—a black strap 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide with a grease box [zhirnitsa] and strap for the dagger; iron fittings. Sword belt—Circassian, a black leather strap with iron fittings.

Pistol—Circassian, of any desired pattern. Sword—Circassian shashka, of the pattern for troops in the Caucasus. Circassian dagger, decorated as desired. Circassian musket, of no established pattern. Musket case—of leather, trimmed outside with wool. Cartridge pouch [patrontash]—of black leather, for 20 cartridges in a single row; instead of a cross strap for the pouch a black silk ribbon 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide is used. Powder holder—horn, with smooth metal mountings. To this there is to be a cord similar to that for the pistol.

The saddle consists of a tree, girth, stirrup straps with stirrups, saddle cloth, crupper, and surcingle with pad. Valise and pillow are of black leather trimmed around the edges with red morocco. The bridle is of rawhide with iron fittings. Halter made from rawhide straps. Circassian nagaika whip (Illus. 1205).

For non-commissioned officers [uryadniki]. Headdress the same as for cossacks but the top lined with silver galloon. Coat the same as for cossacks but with silver galloon sewn around the neck opening down to the waist and along the lower edges of the sleeves. Silver galloon trim on the beshmet along the collar and front opening to the waist. Cartridge-holders, shoulder straps, sharovary pants, and all other parts of the uniform and weaponry are as for cossacks.

Officers.

The same beshmet as for lower ranks but instead of red stamin—red shalloon [shalonovyi]. Cartridge-holders (for 8 cartridge each) are black velvet with inside pockets, trimmed around with wide silver lace; tubes of Karelian birch with silvered caps. Silver epaulettes, scaled, with the same field, on which—as on the buttons—is the regimental sign. Sharovary pants—of the pattern for lower ranks but with two rows of silver galloon down the side seams. Cord—for the pistol, silver. Holder—for the pistol, the same as for lower ranks but trimmed along the seams with silver galloon. Girdle of black lace, interwoven with silver, 1/2 vershoks [7/8 inch] wide, with a grease box and strap for the dagger; fittings silver with black. Sword belt as for lower ranks but with silvered mountings. Shashka sword with a silver sword knot. Valise and saddle pad trimmed around the edges with silver galloon in addition to red morocco. Bridle with silvered fittings.

Headdress, coat, burka, pistol, dagger, saddle with valise and pad, halter, and nagaika whip—in all respects similar to those prescribed for lower ranks.

The lace and galloon for uniforms in the host are to be of Asiastic manufacture throughout, this product being known for its durability and low coast.

The 1st and 2nd Kuban Regiments are to have all the above items as for the 1st and 2nd Caucasian Regiments, but the headdress, beshmet, shoulders straps, pistol lanyard, and upper part of the pistol holder are white (Illus. 1206).

1st and 2nd Laba Regiments—as for the above regiments, but orange headdress, beshmet, shoulder straps, pistol lanyard, and upper part of the pistol holder; on the shoulder straps the regiment’s marking: 1 L in Cyrillic (first Laba), and 2 L (second Laba) (Illus. 1206).

1st and 2nd Stavropol Regiments—as for the above regiments, but green headdress, beshmet, shoulder straps, pistol lanyard, and upper part of the pistol holder; on the shoulder straps the regiment’s marking: 1 S in Cyrillic (first Stavropol), and 2 S (second Stavropol) (Illus. 1207).

1st and 2nd Khoper Regiments—as for the above regiments, but yellow headdress, beshmet, shoulder straps, pistol lanyard, and upper part of the pistol holder; on the shoulder straps the regiment’s marking: 1 Kh in Cyrillic (first Khoper), and 2 Kh (second Khoper) (Illus. 1207).

1st and 2nd Volga Regiments—as for the above regiments, but light-blue headdress, beshmet, shoulder straps, pistol lanyard, and upper part of the pistol holder; on the shoulder straps the regiment’s marking: 1 V in Cyrillic (first Volga), and 2 V (second Volga) (Illus. 1208).

Mountaineer Regiment—as for the Caucasian regiments, but brown coat, sharovary pants, and lower part of the pistol holder; on the shoulder straps the Cyrillic letter G (Gorskii) (Illus. 1208).

Mozdok Regiment—as for the Kuban regiments, but brown coat, sharovary pants, and lower part of the pistol holder; on the shoulder straps the Cyrillic letter M (Mozdok) (Illus. 1209).

Grebensk Regiment—as for the Khoper regiments, but brown coat, sharovary pants, and lower part of the pistol holder; on the shoulder straps the Cyrillic letters Gr (Grebensk) (Illus. 1209).

Vladikavkaz Regiment—as for the Stavropol regiments, but brown coat, sharovary pants, and lower part of the pistol holder; on the shoulder straps the Cyrillic letter V (Vladikavkaz) (Illus. 1210).

Kizlyar Family Regiment—as for the Volga regiments, but brown coat, sharovary pants, and lower part of the pistol holder; on the shoulder straps the Cyrillic letter K (Kizlyar) (Illus. 1210) (9).

19 March 1847 - The 1st Sunzha Cossack Regiment is ordered to have the following uniform clothing: coat and sharovary pants of brown, of the patterns for other regiments of the Caucasian Line Cossack Host; orange beshmet, top to the headdress, and cords, following the example of the Laba regiments; cloth shoulder straps of the same color, with the Cyrillic letters 1 C. punched out [vybitye] on them, signifying the 1st Sunzha Regiment; arms and horse furniture (Illus. 1211) according to the description appended to the Host Regulation (Appendix IX). The exact same uniform is ordered for the 2nd Sunzha Regiment whenever it may be formed (10).

13 February 1849 - The following uniform and weaponry are confirmed for the 1st Caucasian Cossack Foot Battalion (Illus. 1212).

Officers.

Headdress—cloth dark-green top, trimmed in the center with 4 rows of Circassian galloon and in 1 row around the inside of the lambskin brim. Brim of black lamb’s fleece; black chinstrap. Chekmen coat of dark-green cloth in the style of the Asiatic beshmet, with a rounded collar, but with cuffs as for Black Sea Cossack battalions. Red piping on the collar, down the front, and along the cuffs and pockets. The chekmen must be 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] above the knees. Dark-green cloth sharovary pants, with a drawstring, no stripes. Cartridge-holders on the chest of black cloth trimmed with Circassian galloon after the fashion for horse regiments; 16 cartridges mounted in silver.

Circassian dagger mounted in silver. Black silk cord. Circassian shashka sword, mounted in silver. Pistol holder—black cloth with piping the same color as the shoulder straps on the ends and middle. Pistol carrier—black morocco; instead of piping—Circassian galloon; worn at the back on the belt.

Waistbelt of black tape with silver edging, lined with black morocco, with silver small and large buckles, slide, and tip. Sword belt of the same tape as the waistbelt, with silver fittings, also lined with black morocco. Sword knot of the usual infantry pattern. Silver epaulettes with cloth the same color as for the headdresses in horse regiments, with the gold embroidered number and letter 1 K; backed with black cloth.

Greatcoat of grey army cloth with a black collar and tab the same color as the headdress in horse regiments, with a silver button and the characters 1 K. The collar is also lined with black cloth.

Cossacks.

Headdress the same as for officers; for non-commissioned officers trimmed with Circassian galloon crossing in two rows. Chekmen the same as for officers, except for non-commissioned officers the collar and cuffs are trimmed with Circassian galloon. Dark-green sharovary pants, with drawstring, no stripes. Cartridge-holders on the chest—of black morocco trimmed with black tape; 12 cartridges in ivory. Dagger with a bone handle; bayonet in scabbard. Black waistbelt of Circassian leatherwork, with cast iron fittings. Shoulder straps the same color as the headdress in horse regiments with the punched out characters 1 K, backed with yellow cloth. Cartridge-holders for 28 cartridges, of the pattern for Black Sea Cossack foot battalions. Greatcoat of army soldier cloth with the same collar, tabs, and shoulder straps with the characters 1 K, as for officers; tin buttons with the same characters. The greatcoat is to be carried rolled in the infantry manner. Knapsack of black Russian leather, with black straps, of the pattern for the Separate Caucasus Corps.

Drummers: the same headdress as for officers except trimmed with white tape in two rows crosswise and in one row around the lambskin. Chekmen the same as for officers except that the collar, front opening, cuffs, and pockets are trimmed with two rows of white tape; epaulettes of the pattern for Army drummers with piping the same colors as the shoulder straps. Sharovary pants and cartridge-holders on the breast, as for cossacks. Dagger with bone handle. Pistol after the Circassian fashion. Black woollen cord. Pistol holder the same as for officers. Pistol carrier of black morocco without galloon. Waistbelt, shoulder straps, greatcoat, and knapsack as for cossack (11).

7 May 1849 - In the uniform for officers of the 1st Caucasian Cossack Foot Battalion as established on 13 February 1849, it is ordered to make the following changes: the galloon used to trim the headdress, cartridge-holders, and pistol carrier is to be that used in the Caucasian Line Cossack Host. Silver pistol lanyard. Girdle and sword belt to be made from black silk tape with silver stripes along the edges; the stripes are to have a toothed pattern and a gold light. On the epaulettes the characters 1 K are to be made from silver thread the same color as the epaulette tinsel [epoletnaya mishura]; under the epaulettes the cloth is to be red. Instead of 8 cartridges fitting awkwardly on the breast of the chekmen, there are to be only 6 on each side; the cartridges themselves are to be held by fine silver chains; the red piping in the back on the chekmen pockets is abolished; red piping on the sharovary pants (Illus. 1212) (12).

12 February 1851 - In regard to uniforms and arms for generals, staff duty officers, adjutants for special assignments, aides to adjutants, and personnel serving in the Caucasian Line Cossack Host’s internal administration, the following changes are ordered.

Headdress (papakha) of the pattern confirmed for the Separate Caucasus Corps: for generals wearing the standard general officer ’s parade half-caftan, the top of the headdress is to be of red cloth with gold general officer ’s embroidery along the four seams and lower edge; for staff duty officers, adjutants for special assignments, aides to adjutants, and officers serving in the internal administration—the top of the headdress is to be of dark-green cloth with silver galloon, with two narrow red stripes down the galloon’s middle.

Undress half-caftan [vitsepolukaftan] for all these personnel except generals. The undress half-caftan is the same cut as the parade but without buttonhole loops on the collar and without flaps on the cuffs. Girdles are not prescribed for wear with the undress half-caftan.

Weapons: for generals wearing the standard general officer’s parade half-caftan, a dragoon saber instead of a cavalry saber, of the pattern confirmed for the Separate Caucasus Corps, worn on a sword belt over the shoulder made from gold galloon and lined with black morocco. Swordbelt fittings are gilt. When wearing Host uniform, however, a shashka sword as prescribed for the Host, on the sword belt of the confirmed pattern. For staff duty officers, adjutants for special assignments, aides to adjutants, and officers serving in the internal administration—instead of a cavalry saber, the shashka as prescribed for the Host, worn over the shoulder on a sword belt of silver galloon backed with black morocco. Silver fittings for this sword belt (13).

16 December 1851 - The following uniforms and arms are confirmed for the Daghestan Irregular Horse Regiment (Illus. 1213).

For officers.

Headdress—of the pattern for the Caucasian Line Cossack Host with a brim of black lamb’s wool; top of red cloth; trimmed with 8 rows of silver galloon crosswise and one row around the brim.

Chukha (outer dress)—of the pattern for the coat in the Caucasian Line Cossack Host, of black factory-made European cloth; trimmed around the ends of the sleeves and along the side pockets with semi-wide silver galloon. The cartridge-holders [rutsali or gozyri] on the chukha—of red velvet for 20 cartridges; trimmed with 4 rows of silver galloon; the ends of the cartridges silvered. Green silk arkhaluk of Lezghin style; trimmed with narrow silver gallon: two rows on the collar, 1 row on the front opening and ends of the sleeves. Silver epaulettes and likewise shoulder straps. Sharovary pants of black cloth, sewn in Lezghin style, trimmed along the side seams and at the bottom edges with narrow silver galloon. Footwear is European boots. Girdle, straps and belts for the shashka—of silver galloon.

Circassian shashka sword in stamped silver mountings, with a silver hilt. Dagger in silver mountings with a white bone handle. Asiatic pistol in silver mountings, worn on a silver cord. Cartridge pouch of red morocco for 20 cartridges, trimmed with semi-narrow silver galloon. Silver grease-box [sal'nitsa]. Silver powderhorn for gunpowder.

Non-commissioned officers (uryadniki, or vekili), private horsemen, and clerks.

Headdress as for officers with a brim of black lambskin; cloth top for vekili and horsemen: 1st Sotnia - red, 2nd - green, 3rd - yellow, 4th - sky blue, 5th - white, 6th dark blue, for clerks - red.

Chukha of black Lezghin cloth, trimmed around the ends of the sleeve and along the side pockets with narrow silver galloon for vekili and clerks, and with narrow white tape for horsemen. Cartridge-holders of red cloth, for 20 cartridges; trimmed with 4 rows of narrow silver galloon for vekili and clerks, and black tape for horsemen; black bone ends to the cartridges in the holder. Arkhaluk of green burmet (Persian cotton cloth); for vekili and clerks trimmed with narrow silver galloon, and for horsemen with narrow white tape—in 2 rows around the collar, 1 row down the front and at the ends of the sleeves. Sharovary pants of dark-blue burmet, without any trimming. Plain native Lezghin footwear. Girdle, belts, and straps for the shashka are of black leather of Asiatic rawhide manufacture.

Circassian shashka sword in a leather scabbard, with a black bone handle. Dagger in a black leather sheath without any mountings, with a black bone handle. Asiatic musket, carried in a case of mountaineer style, on a black rawhide strap over the right shoulder. Clerks are not prescribed muskets. Asiatic pistol without any mountings, worn on a black tape ribbon. Cartridge pouch of red mishina (semi-morocco) of Asiatic manufacture, for 20 rounds, trimmed with black tape; not authorized for clerks. White tin grease-box. Black bone or horn powerhorn.

The uniforms and weapons described here make up officers’ parade and summer campaign dress, and for winter campaign dress the chukha is lined with fur. For lower ranks the uniform described is the summer dress; for winter dress the chukha is lined with fur and the sharovary, instead of being dark-blue cotton, are made from black Lezghin cloth.

When on the march or on campaign native mountaineers in the Daghestan Regiment were noted wearing a wrap, or tolakha, covering the legs almost to the knees. In summer it was made of silk or cotton cloth, and in winter of thick felt [voilok] or woollen cloth. Dimensions of the clothing and weapons are as follows: chukha sleeves reach to the tips of the fingers and are 4 vershoks [7 inches] wide at the ends, with a slit reaching 4 vershoks from the end opening; the chukha skirts reach 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] below the knees. Arkhaluka collar—1 to 1-1/2 vershoks [1-3/4 to 2-5/8 inches] high; arkhaluka skirts reach to 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] above the knees; sleeves reach to the wrist, and its upper part, thrown forward, covers the hand with its semicircular end reaching to the tips of the fingers; sharovary pants covered all from the waist to the heels, its lower end being 4 to 4-1/2 vershoks [7 to 7-7/8 inches] wide.

Daggers for lower ranks are 3/4 to 1 arshin [21 to 28 inches] long, 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 vershoks [2-3/16 to 2-5/8 inches] wide; for officers a little smaller.

Noncombatant lower ranks in the regiment—apothecary apprentice, medical orderly, lazaret attendants, and barbers—have the same uniforms as for these ranks in regular regiments (14).

ARTILLERY

1 January 1827 - In order to distinguish rank, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as in for regular troops (15).

7 August 1829 - Epaulettes on officers’ uniforms are ordered to have a scaled field as for the epaulette pattern for regular light cavalry (16).

April 1831 - Officers without permanent positions [za-uryad-ofitsery] are to have small forged or stamped stars on their epaulettes like those introduced on 1 January 1827 to distinguish rank (17).

14 February 1845 - By the Regulation for the Caucasian Line Cossack Host confirmed on this date, this host’s horse-artillery batteries (13, 14, and 15) are prescribed uniforms, weapons, and horse furniture as follows.

Cossacks.

Half-round headdresses, the top (bashlyk) of red cloth, brim of shaggy black lambskin, chinstrap of black silk tape. Coat (cherkeska) of dark-green cloth, reaching to 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] below the knees, without a standing collar or cuffs, of the same pattern as for Caucasian Cossack Host regiments, trimmed with red edging along the front opening to the bottoms of both skirts and along the lower end of the sleeves; closed with small hooks from the cartridge-holders to the waist. The beshmet to the coat is of red stamin and 1 vershok [1-3/4 inch] shorter than it. Black cartridge-holders on the coat (each for 8 cartridges), leather, surrounded with red worsted tape; tube of birch with brass caps. Shoulder straps of red cloth with the battery number cut out on yellow cloth; shoulder strap buttons of yellow brass with the raised image of two crossed cannons and the battery number, as prescribed for batteries of Army field artillery. Sharovary pants of dark-green cloth with leather foot straps and a red edge along the seam. pistol lanyard of red wool. Pistol holder—upper part of red cloth and lower part of dark green. Circassian burka instead of a greatcoat. The girdle is a black strap 1/2 vershoks [7/8 inch] wide, with a frog for the dagger and brass fittings.

Circassian sword belt of black leather with brass fittings. Circassian pistol of any pattern. Circassian shashka sword similar to the shashka for Caucasian Line Cossack regiments. Circassian dagger decorated as the owner pleases.

The saddle consists of a tree, girth, stirrup straps with stirrups, saddle cloth, crupper, surcingle, and valise with pillow. The valise and pillow on the saddle are of black leather and trimmed along the edges with red morocco. Bridle of rawhide leather with brass fittings. The halter is made from a rawhide strap. Circassian nagaika whip (Illus. 1214).

Non-commissioned officers [uryadniki].

The same headdress as for cossacks but with the top trimmed with gold galloon. The same cossack pattern coat but the upper part to the waist trimmed with gold galloon, as well as the lower end of the sleeves. The beshmet to the coat has gold galloon trim around the collar and to the waist. Cartridge-holders on the coat, shoulder straps, sharovary, and all other items are exactly the same as for cossacks (Illus. 1215).

Officers.

The beshmet to the coat is of the pattern for lower ranks but of red shalloon instead of red stamin. Cartridge-holders on the coat (each holding 8 cartridges) are black velvet with inside pockets trimmed round with wide gold lace; tubes of Karelian birch with gilt caps. Gold scaled epaulettes with the field the same, on which is the battery number, as is also on the buttons with their image of two crossed cannons. Sharovary pants the same as for lower ranks but trimmed down the side seams with two rows of gold galloon, between which, along the seam, is a red strip. Silver pistol lanyard. Pistol holder as for lower ranks but trimmed along the edges with gold galloon. Girdle of red lace tape interwoven with gold, 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, with a grease-box and loop for the dagger; silvered fittings. Sword belt of the pattern for lower ranks but with silvered fittings. Shashka sword with a silver sword knot. Valise and pillow pad on the saddle trimmed along the edges with gold galloon in addition to the red morocco. Bridle with brass fittings. Headdress, coat, pistol, and all other items of the patterns for lower ranks without any alterations (Illus. 1215) (18).

Apart from the changes in uniforms described here for all units of the Caucasian Line Cossack Host, all directives regarding the standard general officer’s uniform and uniforms for general-adjutants and aides-de-camp to H.I.M., staff duty officers, and adjutants in the Don Host—set forth above in the chapter for that host—also apply to the Caucasian Line Cossack Host.

 

IV. The Astrakhan Cossack Host.
[Astrakhanskoe kazache voisko.]

 

 REGIMENTS

 

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (19).

10 July 1827 - Regiments in the Astrakhan Cossack Host are ordered to have round pompons on the headdress: of white thread [belye nityanye] for lower ranks (later replaced by woollen), silver for officers. (By a misunderstanding these pompons were introduced only for non-commissioned officers [uryadniki] and officers, and privates began to wear them only from 1829) (20).

15 November 1827 - Shoulder straps are established for lower ranks, with the cut-out number of the regiment backed by red cloth (21). Throughout the Host cords on headdresses are removed (21).

27 August 1829 - For officers epaulettes with a scaled field are established, of the pattern for regular light cavalry, with a gilt numeral denoting the number of the regiment (22).

15 November 1829 - Regiments in the Astrakhan Cossack Host are prescribed the same uniform clothing as given to them on 11 October 1817 (dark blue with lemon [limonnyi] trim), 1 January 1827, 10 July 1827, and 7 August 1829, except with white pompons changed to lemon colored, black girdles changed to lemon and white with a mix of black and orange, pistol lanyards changed to lemon with a mix of black color, except for non-commissioned officers who keep the present colors of this cord’s tassels and slides: white with black and orange. Along with these changes the HIGHEST monogram on the cartridge pouch cover is removed. Saddlecloths and cushions, regarding which there had previously been no regulations, are ordered to be of the pattern for the Don Host, dark blue in color with lemon trim. (Illus. 1216 and 1217) (23).

April 1831 - Officers without permanent positions [za-uryad-ofitsery] are to have small stamped stars on their epaulettes to distinguish rank, like those introduced on 1 January 1827 (24).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given a new pattern sash with a narrow silver lace [tes'ma] body with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as for regular forces (25).

17 December 1837 - Following the example of regular forces, officers’ epaulettes are given an additional fourth thin twist of braid (26).

29 April 1838 - The following are prescribed for the Astrakhan Host:

Lower ranks.

Headdresses of the previous pattern. ammunition pouchs instead of cartridge pouches [patrontashi vmesto lyadunok], for 40 rounds, of black Russian leather, with a lid of the same, and a cross strap of black rawhide.

Pistols of the pattern for light cavalry; pistol holders or carriers (instead of holsters) [chushki ili kobury vmesto ol'stredei] of polished black leather; pistol lanyards the same color as the edging on the uniform; the upper part of the pistol case to the lock is of cloth the same color as the collar, while the lower part is of polished black leather. Sword belts of the same leather. Shashkas (instead of sabers) with hilt, rings, bands, and brass endpieces, in a wooden scabbard wrapped with black leather. In mounted order a musket of the pattern for the L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, with a case, worn behind the back over the right shoulder on a black rawhide cross strap 5/8 vershok [1-1/10 inches] wide, with a brass buckle.

Saddlecloths and cushions on the saddle the same color as the uniform, with a canvas lining, trimmed (around the edges of the saddlecloth and along the seams around the cushion) with lemon colored tape 7/8 vershok [1-1/2 inches] wide, with a length of the same tape 9-1/2 vershoks [16-5/8 inches] long on the rear corners of the saddlecloth. Valise of gray cloth, 14-1/2 vershoks [24-1/2 inches] long and 12-3/4 vershoks [22-1/3 inches] in circumference, with a canvas lining and four white metal buttons; on the buttons a raised image of the regimental number (Illus. 1218).

Officers.

Headdress of the previous pattern. ammunition pouch (instead of cartridge pouch) for 20 rounds, of black morocco, with a lid of the same and a crossbelt of silver lace without any light or stripe, lined with black morocco.

Pistols of the pattern for light cavalry officers. Pistol holders of black morocco; silver pistol lanyards; the upper part of the pistol case to the lock of cloth the same color as the collar, the lower of black morocco. Sword belt of silver lace without any light, lined with black morocco. Shashka (instead of saber) with gilt hilt, bands, rings, and endpiece, in a wooden scabbard wrapped with black morocco (Illus. 1219).

Saddlecloths and cushion on the saddle the same color as the uniform, lined with black calf-skin and trimmed (along the edges of the saddlecloth and along the seams around the cushion) with lace the same color as the edges of the coat, 3/4 vershoks [1-1/4 inches] wide, 5-1/2 vershoks [9-5/8 inches] long on the front corners and 9 [15-3/4] on the rear corners. Gray cloth valise 12 vershoks [21 inches] long and 9 [15-3/4] in circumference, with leather lining and four silver buttons; on the buttons a raised image of the regimental number.

For lower ranks as well as officers, pistols are ordered to be carried in a holder fastened to the sword belt behind the back, near the left side, but they were to be worn—as well as the holder, cord, and case—only when in full uniform [pri polnoi forme].

Horse harness for lower ranks is prescribed to be arranged so that the valise and horse cloth [popona] are behind the saddle; the horse cloth is to be stowed under the valise and together with it lashed to the saddle with three black straps with brass double-sided buckles of the previous pattern; the greatcoat is in front of the saddle and tied to it with three of the same straps with buckles; the rolling of the greatcoat and the stowing of other items, as well as all uniform clothing, accouterments, and weapons not mentioned here, including the cover for the headdress, are left unchanged (27).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established for the front of the band on officers’ forage caps, as for officers’ caps in regular forces (28).

20 May 1844 - With the general allocation of colors for forage caps throughout the Military establishment, dark-blue forage caps are established for the Astrakhan Cossack Host, with a yellow band and yellow piping around the top (29).

6 January 1845 - By the Administrative Regulation for the Astrakhan Cossack Host laid down on this date, its regiments are prescribed the following uniforms, weapons, and horse furniture.

Lower ranks.

Headdress of black lamb’s fleece with a yellow cloth crown and a chinstrap; yellow woolen pompon, with yellow cloth lining on a lower pompon [repeika]; black neckcloth; very dark-blue cloth chekmen with yellow piping around the collar and cuffs; very dark-blue sharovary pants with yellow stripes; yellow shalloon [shalonovyi] girdle; gray cloth greatcoat with yellow tabs on the collar; boots with iron spurs; yellow shoulder straps with a red regimental number and white metal buttons; red leather sword knot; forage cap of very dark-blue cloth with yellow band and piping, no visor.

ammunition pouch for 40 rounds in tin holders laid in two rows, lined with black leather, with a lid of the same leather and stitching along the edges. Crossbelt for the ammunition pouch of black rawhide leather, 3/4 vershoks [1-1/4 inches] wide, with a brass buckle, slide, and endpiece.

Carrier for stowing the pistol - of black leather with two side flaps, with stitching along the edges, 4 vershoks [7 inches] long on the left side and 5 [8-3/4] on the right, 4 vershoks [7 inches] wide at the top and 1-3/4 [3] at the bottom; pistol lanyard of yellow wool with one tassel and two slides, 2 arshins 7 veshoks [68-1/4 inches] long. Pistol case of dark-blue cloth to the lower part of the lock, and from the bottom of shiny black leather upwards to the middle where the cloth ends; the case is trimmed around with dark-blue tape; for tying around the butt - a yellow woolen cord with tassel; length of the cases 9-1/2 vershoks [16-5/8 inches], width at the top 3-1/2 [6-1/8] and at the bottom 1-3/4 [3]; below, the circumference of the bottom is 2-1/2 vershoks [4-3/8 inches]; tape on the cases is 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide. Sword belt of shiny black leather with three brass buckles; width of the strap - 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches].

Saddlecloth of dark-blue army cloth with canvas lining, trimmed around the edges with yellow cloth tape 7/8 vershok [1-1/2 inches] wide. The same tape is laid on the rear corners of the saddlecloth, 9-1/2 vershoks [16-5/8 inches] in length. Cushion of dark-blue army cloth with canvas lining, trimmed along the seams with yellow cloth tape 7/8 vershok [1-1/2 inches] wide.

Valise of gray army cloth with canvas lining, four white metal buttons with the regimental number. Length of the valise - 14-1/2 vershoks [24-1/2 inches], the ends 12-3/4 vershoks [22-1/3 inches] in circumference.

Saddle and harness of the usual cossack pattern; bridle, harness, and chest-band [uzda, pafy i nagrudnik] without any fittings; saddle-blanket [potnik] with cover of thick white linen, in five layers, covered above, trimmed with black calf-leather along the edges below; surcingle [v'yuchnyi remen'] of black rawhide with a brass buckle, 1 arshin 7 vershoks [40-1/4 inches] long.

Shashka sword - handle, bands with rings, and endpiece—of brass; wooden scabbard, wrapped in black leather, without a case; pistol of the pattern adopted in the cavalry, with a case sewn into the pistol carrier, worn on the waist on the left; musket with its sling, confirmed on 29 April 1838; musket case of black shaggy felt [burka] with a strap of black rawhide leather 3/8 vershok [5/8 inch] wide; horse-cloth [popon] of gray cloth; lance [drotik] with a dark-green shaft.

For clerks and non-commissioned officers there is silver galloon on the collar and cuffs. For trumpeters the coat and for non-commissioned officers the tassels on cords and cases are according to the confirmed patterns.

Officers.

Silver pompon on the headdress, lower pompon lined with yellow cloth; very dark-blue cloth chekmen, with silver buttonhole loops and yellow piping on the collar and cuffs; yellow silk girdle, silver epaulettes, according to the confirmed pattern; silver sash of the confirmed pattern; silver sword knot on silk lace; forage cap the same as for lower ranks but with a visor.

Ammunition pouch for 20 rounds in tin holders laid out in one row and lined with black morocco leather; ammunition pouch trimmed from the bottom along the seam with thin black silk cord, with a black morocco lid trimmed along the edge with silver lace without a light; ammunition pouch belt of silver lace without a light, lined with black morocco, 11/16 vershok [1-1/5 inches] wide, with silver buckles, slides, and endpieces.

Carrier for stowing the pistol, of black morocco with two flaps, with stitching along the edges, 1-7/8 vershoks [3-1/4 inches] long on the left side, 3-1/2 [6-1/8] on the right; 3 vershoks [5-1/4 inches] wide at the top, 1-1/2 [2-5/8] at the bottom; silver pistol lanyard with one tassel and two slides, length 2 arshins 10 vershoks [73-1/2 inches]. Pistol case of dark-blue cloth to the lower part of the lock, the rest of black morocco; upwards, to the middle where the cloth ends, and below at the very bottom—trimmed around with silver lace without a light; for tying around the butt—a black silk cord; length of the case 7 vershoks [12-1/4 inches], 3-3/4 [6-1/2] wide at the top, 1-3/4 [3] wide in the middle, and 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] in circumference at the bottom; the lace on the cases is 3-3/8 vershoks [5-9/10 inches] wide. Sword belt of the pattern confirmed for light cavalry, modified so that the waist strap is whole and the slings sewn to it by means of an oval ring which is only half visible; the sword belt itself is sewn to the waist belt with silver lace without a light.

Dark-blue cloth saddlecloth lined with black calf-leather, trimmed along the edges with yellow tape 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide; the same tape in the corners of the saddlecloth: 5-1/2 vershoks [9-5/8 inches] long in the front corners and 9 [15-3/4] in the rear; dark-blue cloth pillow lined around with black calf-leather and trimmed along the seam with yellow tape 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide. Gray cloth valise with leather reinforcement, with four white metal buttons with the regimental number; the valise is 12 vershoks [21 inches] long, its ends 9 vershoks [15-3/4 inches] around.

Shashka - handle, bands with rings, and all other items according to the patterns for lower ranks, except for the musket with its sling, case, and lance, which are not prescribed for officers (Illus. 1220 and 1221) (30).

14 April 1845 - Chekmens in the Astrakhan Host are replaced with jackets, as in the Don Host. Along with this officers are ordered to wear their pistols with cords only when in formation (31).

27 April 1845 - As a consequence of the change on 14 April 1845 in the uniforms of the Astrakhan Host, it is laid down that: the chekmen is to be dark blue in color, as before, but in length reaching to 4 vershoks [7 inches] above the knee, with a yellow edge on the collar and cuffs, and for officers the addition of their prescribed silver buttonhole loops; headdress of black fleece 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high without an indentation on top, with a yellow cloth bag under which is sewn an oilcloth base; yellow girdle; pistol lanyard of the previous pattern but sewn to the carrier that is attached to the sword belt on the left side (Illus. 1220 and 1221). The rest of the items of uniform clothing and weaponry, as well as horse furniture, remain unchanged (32).

 

ARTILLERY.

 

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (33).

7 August 1829 - Epaulettes with scaled fields are established for officers’ uniforms, of the pattern for epaulettes in the regular light cavalry (34).

15 November 1829 - According to new confirmation of the uniform patterns for Astrakhan Cossack artillery, it is prescribed the same uniform clothing and weaponry as horse artillery companies of the Don artillery, but with the following distinctions: headdress without cords; shoulder straps and epaulettes with the number 7; instead of red stripes on the sharovary pants—lemon colored; on the rear corners of saddlecloths are added the HIGHEST monogram in yellow cloth, trimmed with red cord (Illus. 1222) (35).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given new pattern sashes with narrow silver lace with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as for regular forces (36).

17 December 1837 - To officers’ epaulettes is added, following the example of the regular forces, a fourth thin twist of braid (37).

29 April 1838 - The changes promulgated on this date and described above in regard to the uniforms and weapons of Don Horse-Artillery batteries are extended with equal force to the artillery of the Astrakhan Cossack Host, except for the stripes on the sharovary pants, which in the Astrakhan artillery remain lemon colored, as before (Illus. 1223) (38).

22 May 1838 - With the change in numbering in Cossack Horse Artillery, the Astrakhan Cossack Host’s artillery half-battery is prescribed No. 13 on epaulettes and shoulder straps instead of No. 7 (39).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established for the front of the band on officers’ forage caps, as for officers’ caps in regular forces (40).

6 January 1845 - According to the administrative regulation of this date for the Astrakhan Cossack Host, the Horse-Artillery battery (No. 16) is prescribed uniforms, weapons, and horse furniture completely identical to that confirmed on 20 April 1838 and 14 and 27 April 1845 for horse-artillery batteries of the Don Host, as set forth in detail above (see Don Host artillery) (41).

27 April 1845 - Following the example of the Don Host, for the Astrakhan Cossack artillery (its Horse-Artillery Battery No. 16) are established: chekmen of dark-green cloth with collar and cuffs of black cloth, reaching to 4 vershoks [7 inches] above the knee; on the collar, cuffs, and down the front an edging of red cloth; headdress of black fleece 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high without an indentation, with a scarlet cloth bag under which is sewn an oilcloth base. Pistol case of the previous pattern, but sewn to the carrier which is fastened to the sword belt on the left side. The remaining items of uniform clothing and weaponry, as well as horse furniture, remain unchanged (42).

8 July 1852 - Chekmens in Horse-Artillery batteries are ordered to be made following the example of the Don and Caucasian Cossack artillery with a red edge down the front opening (43).

Apart from the changes in uniform described here for all units of the Astrakhan Cossack Host, all orders promulgated in regard to the standard general-officer’s uniform and the uniforms for general-adjutants, aides-de-camp of H.I.M., and adjutants to Don Host generals, set forth above in the section for that Host, also apply to the Astrakhan Cossack Host.

 

V. The Ural Cossack Host.
[Ural'skoe kazache voisko.]

 

 REGIMENTS

 

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (44).

7 August 1829 - Epaulettes with scaled fields are established for officers’ uniforms, of the pattern for epaulettes in the regular light cavalry (45).

15 November 1829 - Regiments in the Ural Host are prescribed the same uniforms as confirmed on this date for the Astrakhan Host and described above in the section for that Host, with the lemon color changed everywhere to light blue [svetlosinii] and the red numbers on the shoulder straps changed to white (Illus. 1224 and 1225) (46).

April 1831 - Officers without permanent positions [za-uryad-ofitsery] are to have small stamped stars on their epaulettes to distinguish rank, like those introduced on 1 January 1827 (47).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given a new pattern sash of narrow silver lace [tesma] with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as for regular forces (48).

17 December 1837 - Following the example of regular forces, officers’ epaulettes are given an additional fourth thin twist of braid (49).

29 April 1838 - The changes in uniforms and weapons promulgated on this date for the regiments of the Astrakhan Host are extended with equal force to the regiments of the Ural Host, except for its prescribed distinctive colors (Illus. 1226) (50).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established for the front of the band on officers’ forage caps, as for officers’ caps in regular forces (51).

20 May 1844 - With the general allocation of colors for forage caps throughout the Military establishment, dark-blue forage caps are established for the Ural Host, with a light-blue band and light-blue piping around the top (52).

14 April 1845 - Chekmens in the Ural Host are replaced with jackets of the pattern established for Cossack generals when in Host uniform. Along with this, Ural Cossack regiments, when on service in the Caucasus, are permitted to wear headdresses of the pattern for the Caucasian Line Cossack Host. Officers are ordered to wear pistols with cords only when in formation (53).

27 April 1845 - As a consequence of the change on 14 April 1845 in the uniforms of the Ural Host, the following uniform is established: dark-blue chekmen, as before, but in length reaching to 4 vershoks [7 inches] above the knee, with a light-blue edge on the collar and cuffs, and for officers the addition of their prescribed silver buttonhole loops; headdress of black fleece 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high without an indentation on top, with a light-blue cloth bag under which is sewn an oilcloth base; light-blue girdle; pistol lanyard of the previous pattern but sewn to the carrier that is attached to the sword belt on the left side. The rest of the items of uniform clothing and weaponry, as well as horse furniture, remain unchanged (Illus. 1227) (54).

 

LIFE-GUARDS URAL SOTNIA.

 

(Until 6 April 1830 this was the Leib-Ural Sotnia, being renamed the Life-Guards Ural Sotnia on this date. On 25 September 1846 it was named the Life-Guards Ural Squadron, and on 17 August 1847—the Life-Guards Ural Cossack Double-Squadron)

15 April 1826 - White thread plumes were established for the Leib-Ural Sotnia in place of white hair plumes. Officers were given silver pompons. Instead of black accouterments—white, according to the patterns for the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment (Illus. 1228 and 1229) (55).

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (56).

13 December 1828 - Epaulettes with a scaled field and a hanging white fringe are established for lower ranks (Illus. 1230) (57).

7 August 1829 - Epaulettes with scaled fields are established for officers’ uniforms, of the pattern for epaulettes in the regular light cavalry (58).

4 July 1837 - On all those occasions when in the regular forces frock coats are allowed to be worn, officers of the L.-Gds. Ural Sotnia, apart from the coat with buttonhole loops, are permitted to wear a chekmen without embroidery: dark blue without any piping, as established on 28 October 1836 for the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment (59).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given new pattern sashes with narrow silver lace with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as for regular forces (60).

17 December 1837 - To officers’ epaulettes is added, following the example of the regular forces, a fourth thin twist of braid (61).

29 April 1838 - For the L.-Gds. Ural Sotnia there are established:

Lower ranks.

Headdresses without cords, with a plate of white tin of the pattern prescribed on this date for the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment; iron epaulettes without a fringe, with a backing of light-blue cloth.

Ammunition pouch (instead of cartridge pouch) for 40 rounds, of black Russian leather, with a lid of the same and a deerskin crossbelt, without any ornamentation; pistols of the pattern adopted in the light cavalry; pistol carriers or holders (instead of holsters) of shiny black leather; pistol lanyards of light-blue wool; the upper part of the pistol cases to the firelock to be of light-blue cloth; the lower part of shiny black leather; sword belts of red Russian leather; shashkas (instead of sabers) with brass handle, bands, rings, and endpieces in wooden scabbards wrapped with black leather; muskets (instead of carbines) for mounted order, after the pattern for the L.-Gds. Black Sear Squadron, with cases; muskets to be worn behind the back on a rawhide belt over the right shoulder, 5/8 vershok [1-1/10 inches] wide, with a brass buckle (Illus. 1231).

Officers.

Headdresses without cords and with the same decoration as for lower ranks but in silver.

Ammunition pouchs (instead of cartridge pouches) of black morocco with a lid of light-blue cloth, with a crossbelt of silver lace without any light, backed by black morocco; pistols of the pattern adopted by officers in the light cavalry; pistol carriers of black morocco; silver pistol lanyards; the upper part of the pistol cases of light-blue cloth, the lower part of black morocco; sword belt of silver lace without any light, lined with black morocco; shashk (instead of saber) with gilt handle, bands, rings, and endpieces, in a wooden scabbard wrapped with black morocco (Illus. 1232).

Following the example of the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment, officers as well as lower ranks in the sotnia are ordered to carry the pistol in its carrier, fastened to the sword belt in back near the left side, but they are to carry it, as well as the carrier, cord, and case, only when in full uniform. Lower ranks’ horse furniture is prescribed to be fitted according to the directions established at this time for the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment. All items of uniform clothing, accouterments, and weaponry not mentioned here, including the cover for the headdress, remain unchanged, except for collars and cuffs on winter and summer coats, to which is added piping of light-blue cloth following the pattern for the winter coat of H.I.M. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s Ataman Regiment, and also except for greatcoats, which the sotnia is ordered to have the same as for that regiment (62).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established for the band on officers’ forage caps, as for officers’ caps in regular forces (63).

20 May 1844 - With the general allocation of forage cap colors throughout the Military Administration, dark-blue caps are established for the L.-Gds. Ural Sotnia, with a light-blue band and light-blue piping around the top (64).

14 April 1845 - Jackets are withdrawn from the L.-Gds. Ural Sotnia. Only chekmens are left for both ceremonial and everyday occasions. Officers are ordered to wear pistols with cords only when in formation (65).

27 April 1845 - Consequent to the changes in uniform of 14 April 1845 for the L.-Gds. Ural Sotnia, there are established:

Lower ranks.

Coat [mundir] of the pattern of the previous winter coats except reaching to 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] above the knee; headdress of black astrakhan 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high, without an indentation, with a bag of light-blue cloth, under which is sewn an oilcloth base; ammunition pouch of the pattern for H.I.M. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s Ataman Regiment, i.e. of black lacquered leather, on a white elkskin belt, for 20 rounds in two rows; pistol of the pattern for H.I.M. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s Ataman Regiment, i.e. on a light-blue cord and in a case of light-blue cloth sewn to a leather holder worn on the sword belt on the left side, and not behind the back (Illus. 1233).

Officers.

Coat and shashka sword of the patterns for lower ranks; ammunition pouch and pistol of the previous pattern, but with the pistol case sewn to the holder; worn on the left side on the sword belt; the undress chekmen [vitsechekmen'] for officers, the sharovary pants for officers and lower ranks, and all other items of uniform and weaponry not mentioned here, as well as horse harness, remain unchanged (66).

27 February 1847 - The L.-Gds. Ural Squadron is ordered to have shabracks as for other Guards Cossack troops (67).

18 January 1848 - A pattern for officers’ cartridge pouches [lyadunki] is confirmed in place of the carriers [patrontashi] (68).

27 January 1848 - For the L.-Gds. Ural Double-Squadron a sky-blue parade coat [goluboi paradnyi mundir] with a dark-blue collar is established (Ilus. 1234) (69).

15 January 1851 - It is ordered that: the musket sling be made of two rawhide straps with one side blackened, joined together by a brass buckle and fastened to the musket by the ends being passed through the stock; the musket case be of black Russian leather lined with gray cloth and have a rawhide strap opposite the hammer; the brass kettle be carried on the right side of the valise instead of the left, in order to avoid damaging the musket and shashka; officers are not to have holsters, and pistols are to be in a carrier of the present pattern; lower ranks, when going out on guard duty, are to have the musket worn over the shoulder (70).

1 May 1852 - The establishment of the L.-Gds. Ural Cossack Double-Squadron is ordered to have, following the example of the L.-Gds. Black Sea Cossack Double-Squadron, 6 trumpeters, who are always to be on duty with the squadron of the L.-Gds. Ural Double-Squadron that is in St. Petersburg (71).

Apart from the changes in uniform described here for all units of the Ural Cossack Host, all orders promulgated in regard to the standard general-officer’s uniform and the uniforms for general-adjutants, aides-de-camp of H.I.M., and adjutants to Don Host generals, set forth above, also apply to the Ural Cossack Host.

 

 

VI. The Orenburg Cossack Host.
[Orenburgskoe kazache voisko.]

 

 REGIMENTS

 

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (72).

7 August 1829 - Epaulettes with scaled fields are established for officers’ uniforms, of the pattern for epaulettes in the regular light cavalry (73).

15 November 1829 - Regiments in the Orenburg Cossack Host are prescribed the same uniforms as confirmed on this date for the Ural Host and described above in the section for that Host, except with the light-blue color changed everywhere to raspberry (Illus. 1235) (74).

April 1831 - Officers without permanent positions [zauryad-ofitsery] are to have small stamped stars on their epaulettes to distinguish rank, like those introduced on 1 January 1827 (75).

4 November 1833 - In regiments of the Orenburg Cossack Host saddle-trees [lenchiki] are removed from saddles. In place of the previous carbines, they are given muskets of the new pattern established for the Black Sea Host, likewise carried over the back on a black sling (76).

21 March 1835 - With the establishment, instead of two Teptyar Cossack regiments, of one cossack regiment included in the Orenburg Cossack Host under the title of the First Orenburg and made up of 8 active squadrons, 1 reserve squadron, and 1 noncombatant company, its personnel are prescribed the following uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry:

Lower combatant ranks.

Headdress of the pattern for the Don Host but with a falling bag, upper and lower pompons of light-blue cloth; gray cloth greatcoat with a light-blue collar; dark-green cloth jacket with light-blue piping on the collar and cuffs, and shoulder straps of the same color; sharovary pants of dark-green cloth with light-blue stripes; light-blue girdle; carbine, pistol, lance with pennant—the top white and bottom light blue; saber (Illus. 1236).

Officers.

Officers have the same uniform as lower ranks but with a single silver buttonhole loop on each side of the jacket’s collar, with two buttonholes on the cuffs and the other distinctions for officers (Illus. 1237).

Noncombatant ranks.

Gray forage cap with a similar band, with two light-blue lines of piping and a visor; gray cloth greatcoat and half-caftan with dark-green collar and light-blue shoulder straps; gray riding trousers with light-blue piping (Illus. 1238) (77).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given a new pattern sash of narrow silver lace with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as for regular forces (78).

17 December 1837 - Officers’ epaulettes are given an additional fourth thin twist of braid (79).

29 April 1838 - The changes in uniforms and weapons promulgated on this date for the regiments of the Astrakhan Cossack Host and described above are extended with equal force to the regiments of the Orenburg Cossack Host, except for its prescribed distinctive colors (Illus. 1239 and 1240), and the 1st Orenburg Regiment’s lance pennants are kept (80).

12 December 1840 - With the confirmation on this date of an Administrative Regulation for the Orenburg Cossack Host, all regiments of the Host (No. 1 through 10) are prescribed uniform clothing, weapons, and horse furniture in accordance with the pattern confirmed on 21 March 1835 for the 1st Orenburg Cossack Regiment, in which at this same time pennants are removed from lances. Shoulder straps are to have the number assigned to that regiment (81).

13 April 1842 - With the renaming of the 1st Orenburg Cossack Regiment as the Ufa Cossack Regiment, it is ordered that the shoulder straps of that unit’s lower ranks have, instead of a number, the Cyrillic letters U K. Buttons are smooth, as for other regiments (82).

12 October 1843 - The following are established for lower ranks of the Orenburg Cossack Host who are transferred to internal service within the Host:

Mounted lower ranks.

Dark-green cloth forage cap with a light-blue band and light-blue piping; gray cloth greatcoat with a light-blue collar; gray cloth sharovary pants with light-blue piping; ammunition pouch, sword belt, and shashka sword of the patterns for serving cossacks; pistol with cord of the normal pattern; saddle as for serving cossacks, without the cloth shabrack (Illus. 1241).

Lower ranks on foot.

Forage cap, greatcoat, and sharovary as for mounted cossacks; a lance 2-1/2 arshins [70 inches] long (Illus. 1241) (83).

20 October 1843 - Following the example of lower ranks in regular light cavalry regiments, lower ranks of the Ufa Cossack Regiment are ordered to have muskets when in dismounted formation, as well as when on guard duties (84).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is ordered to be worn on the band on officers’ forage caps in the Orenburg Cossack Host, as established at this same time for officer’ caps in regular forces (85).

7 January 1844 - On this date the following uniform and weaponry in the Ufa Cossack Regiment is confirmed for a noncombatant company officer and for government authorized orderlies [kazennye denshchiki]:

Officers of the Ufa Cossack Regiment’s noncombatant company.

Gray cloth chekmen with light-blue collar and cuffs; gray cloth sharovary pants with light-blue stripes; headdress, upper and lower pompons, epaulettes, pistol, pistol lanyard, girdle, and shashka sword—the same as for combatant officers of the Ufa Cossack Regiment (Illus. 1243).

Authorized orderlies in the Ufa Cossack Regiment.

Dark-green cloth chekmen, with lining of the same color as the chekmen; standing collar fastened by small hooks, as is the front opening; sharovary pants and boots the same as worn by the officers to whom the orderly is attached; gray cloth greatcoat of soldier pattern but without shoulder straps and with an officer’s cape, with sewn-on stripes of the color of the coat collar of the officer to whom the orderly is attached; forage cap of the pattern for soldiers, with light-blue on the seams along the sides and on the crown (86).

20 May 1844 - With the general allocation of colors for forage caps throughout the Military establishment, dark-green caps are established for the Orenburg and Ufa Cossack Regiments (the latter would be disbanded on 29 September 1845), with a light-blue band and light-blue piping around the top (87).

14 April 1845 - Chekmens are replaced with jackets of the pattern established for Cossack generals when in Host uniform. Officers are ordered to wear pistols with cords only when in formation (88).

27 April 1845 - As a consequence of the change on 14 April 1845 in the uniforms of the Orenburg Cossack Host, the following uniform is established: dark-green chekmen, as before, but in length reaching to 4 vershoks [7 inches] above the knee, with a light-blue edge on the collar and cuffs, and for officers the addition of their prescribed silver buttonhole loops; headdress of black fleece 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high without an indentation on top, with a light-blue cloth bag under which is sewn an oilcloth base; light-blue girdle; pistol lanyard of the previous pattern but sewn to the carrier that is attached to the sword belt on the left side (Illus. 1244). The rest of the items of uniform clothing and weaponry, as well as horse furniture, remain unchanged (89).

6 October 1854 - Uniforms and arms are confirmed for the newly formed foot battalions of the Orenburg Cossack Host (Illus. 1245).

Officers.

Headdress of sky-blue cloth, the top rounded and quilted, trimmed around with silver lace 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, brim of black sheep’s fleece, chinstrap of black leather 1/2 vershok wide. Dark-green cloth forage cap with two lines of sky-blue piping around the top and above the band, with a visor. Black silk neckcloth with a bib [manishka]. Dark-green coat with light-blue piping around the collar and cuffs, closed with small hooks; behind and on the sides with four pleats [skladki] with pockets between them; skirts to reach to 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] above the knee; two silver buttonhole loops on the cuffs and one on the collar. Chekmen of the same cloth and cut as the coat, but without buttonhole loops.

Standard army cossack ammunition pouch, for 20 rounds; lid and cartridges of black morocco; lid trimmed with silver galloon; crossbelt of silver galloon backed with black morocco, with silver mountings. The ammunition pouch is worn over the left shoulder so that its right end comes under the arm in the middle third of the right side of the body, and the left end—in the direction of the left shoulder.

Silver epaulettes; battalion number on a sky-blue field; backed with cloth, likewise sky blue, and fastened with a smooth white metal button. Belt of silver lace 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide with silver fittings and backed with black morocco. Dark-green sharovary pants with sky-blue piping and two pockets. Summer sharovary of thin white linen, of the same cut as the winter sharovary. Greatcoat of the normal officer pattern with a gray cloth hood and collar, with sky-blue edging along the collar and smooth white metal buttons. Army boots.

Shashka sword - according to the description confirmed on 29 April 1838. Infantry sword knot. Silver sword belt, without any light, backed with black morocco, with silver fittings; worn over the shoulder. Cavalry pistol. Carrier for stowing the pistol - of black morocco; to be worn at the waist on the left side even with the shashka. Pistol case - the top part of dark-green cloth; trimmed with narrow silver lace where it fastens; the lower part of black morocco; trimmed with the same lace where the cloth joins the leather and at the end of the leather; tied with a black silk cord with a tassel. pistol lanyard - silver with a tassel. suede gloves.

Cossacks.

Headdress as for officers, of sky-blue army cloth; for non-commissioned officers [uryadniki] trimmed around with white thread lace and crossed on top with the same narrow lace; for cossacks trimmed only crosswise with narrow lace; brim and chinstrap as for officers. Dark-green forage cap of army cloth with two lines of sky-blue piping as for officers, but without a visor; on the band is cut out the company number. Black neckcloth of army cloth.

Chekmen (officer pattern) - of dark-green army cloth; the collar and interior of the chekmen to the waist is lined with linen; for non-commissioned officers the collar and cuffs are trimmed with silver army galloon; shoulder straps of sky-blue cloth with the battalion number cut out on yellow cloth.

Ammunition pouch of black Russian leather with holders for 40 rounds, of the pattern for Caucasus sappers; worn over the left shoulder on a crossbelt of white Russian leather under black polish, 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide.

Belt of shiny black leather 6/8 vershok wide, with iron double and small buckles, endpiece, and slide, of the pattern for Black Sea Cossacks. Sharovary pants of dark-green army cloth with sky-blue piping and two pockets in the linen lining. Summer sharovary of army Flemish linen with two pockets made from lining linen, of the same pattern as winter sharovary. Soldier’s greatcoat of standard pattern, of gray cloth, likewise the collar, which has sky-blue edging along the top; sky-blue shoulder straps of army cloth with the battalion number cut through on yellow cloth; smooth tin buttons. Army boots.

Standard infantry musket with bayonet. The bayonet scabbard is hung onto the belt by means of a frog in the manner for Black Sea Cossacks. The musket is also prescribed for non-commissioned officers. The musket sling and flint case [ognivyi chekhol] are of Russian leather polished black, following the patterns for regular troops. The gun-lock cover is the infantry pattern (in the case of percussion muskets being introduced it will be necessary to have firing nipple covers in accordance with the Minister of War’s order of 13 December 1851).

Infantry knapsack, of calf-skin leather with straps of Russian leather polished black, 1 vershok [1-3/4 inches] wide; the straps are worn crossed over the chest in the manner of Tobolsk Cossacks. Iron pot and greatcoat strap. The iron pot is straped to the knapsack; over the knapsack is the greatcoat, rolled up in the infantry manner as for Tobolsk Cossacks; the straps for securing the pot and greatcoat are made of the same leather as the knapsack straps, the pot straps 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, the greatcoat straps 3/4 vershok [1-1/4]. (In the case of the battalions being armed with percussion muskets, it will be necessary to make a cut-out pocket under the knapsack cover flap for an iron case holding spare caps, as in the regular infantry.) Gloves - of dark-green cloth, of the pattern for army troops.

Drummers.

Headdress, forage cap, and neckcloth as for cossacks. Chekmen as for cossacks, but the breast, sleeves, and shoulder wings of sky-blue cloth; for musicians of non-commissioned officer rank the seams on the back are further trimmed with white army tape, according to the normal pattern for army drummers. Ammunition pouch of black Russian leather for 12 rounds, worn on a belt on the right side. Belt, winter and summer sharovary, greatcoat, boots, knapsack, iron pot, greatcoat strap, and gloves - as for cossacks. Drummer’s crossbelt of white Russian leather under black polish, of the pattern for jäger regiments, 2-1/2 vershoks [4-3/8 inches] wide.

Cavalry pistol. Carriers of shiny black leather of the pattern for Black Sea Cossack battalions, worn on a belt between the knapsack and left thigh, with the butt turned under the left arm. Pistol case - the top of dark-green army cloth lined with linen, trimmed with narrow worsted sky-blue tape where it is fastened; lower part of shiny black leather with cloth trimmed with the same tape; closed with a sky-blue worsted cord with tassel. Worsted pistol lanyard, sky blue with a tassel (90).

 

 ARTILLERY

 

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (91).

7 August 1829 - Epaulettes with scaled fields are established for officers’ uniforms, of the pattern for epaulettes in the regular light cavalry (92).

15 November 1829 - In the Orenburg Cossack artillery uniforms, arms, and horse furniture are established as in Don Horse-Artillery companies, except for headdress cords, which are not prescribed for the Orenburg artillery (Illus. 1246), and the replacement of yellow trim on lower ranks’ saddlecloths by red (93).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given new pattern sashes with narrow silver lace with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as for regular forces (94).

17 December 1837 - To officers’ epaulettes is added, following the example of the regular forces, a fourth thin twist of braid (95).

29 April 1838 - The changes in uniforms and arms for Don Horse-Artillery batteries, described above, are applied in equal measure to the artillery of the Orenburg Cossack Host (96).

1 July 1839 - For lower ranks in training detachments of Orenburg Cossack Host horse-artillery batteries, the cadre of these detachments as well as the personnel rotated annually, there is established yellow tape around the epaulette, following the pattern confirmed for Instructional troops (97).

26 January 1841 - By an Administrative Regulation confirmed on this date for the Orenburg Cossack Host its horse-artillery batteries (16, 17, and 18) are prescribed the same uniforms, weapons, and horse furniture as the previous Host batteries had (14 and 15), without any change except for the numbers on shoulder straps and officer’ epaulettes (98).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established for the band on officers’ forage caps, as introduced for officers’ caps in regular forces (99).

14 April 1845 - The batteries’ previous jackets are replaced with a chekmen. Officers are ordered to wear pistols with cords only when in formation (100).

27 April 1845 - Consequent to the changes in uniform of 14 April 1845 for the Orenburg Cossack artillery, there are established for its horse-artillery batteries:

Chekmen of dark-green cloth with a collar and cuffs of black cloth, with edging on the collar, cuffs, and down the front opening of red cloth; chekmen to reach to 4 vershoks [7 inches] above the knee. Headdress of black astrakhan 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high, without an indentation, with a bag of scarlet cloth. Pistol case of the previous pattern but sewn into the holder and secured to the sword belt on the left side. All other items of uniform and weaponry, as well as horse furniture, not mentioned here remain unchanged (101).

5 April 1849 - The batteries in the Orenburg Host’s Horse-Artillery Brigade are ordered to have artillery draft horses of the Kirghiz steppe breed, no taller than 2 arshins 2 vershoks [59-1/2 inches] and no shorter than 1 arshin 15 vershoks [54-1/4 inches], from 5 to 7 years of age. They are to be branded after the manner in the Siberian Cossack Host on the croup so that the horses from these batteries, when with the Instructional platoon in St. Petersburg, are from domestic breeds as before (102).

8 July 1852 - It is ordered that the chekmen be made after the example of chekmens in the Don and Caucasian Cossack artillery, with red edging down the front (103).

Apart from the changes in uniform described here for all units of the Orenburg Cossack Host, all orders promulgated in regard to the standard general-officer’s uniform and the uniforms for general-adjutants, aides-de-camp of H.I.M., and adjutants to Don Host generals, set forth above in the section for that Host, also apply to the Orenburg Cossack Host.

 

 

VII. Teptyar Regiments [Teptyarskie polki].

 

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks in the 1st and 2nd Teptyar Regiments, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (104).

10 July 1827 - In these regiments it is ordered that there be round pompons on the headdress: white for lower ranks and silver for officers (105).

15 November 1829 - These regiments, which have had dark-blue jackets with red piping on the collar and cuffs, red shoulder straps, and black sharovary pants with stripes, are ordered to have jackets with red piping also down the front, with light-blue shoulder straps on which is cut out the regimental number, on white cloth. Sharovary - dark-blue with the previous stripe. With this change lower ranks are prescribed standard cossack headdresses with a light-blue upper pompon, lower pompon, and bag; black girdles of a cotton material; boots with iron spurs; cavalry sabers as established for regular light cavalry regiments; black leather sword belts with brass buckles; pistols in a black leather holder worn on the left side, with a cord and tassel of light-blue mixed with black; small shiny black leather cartridge pouches [podsumki] with the a similar crossbelt without any metal fittings, and an iron ramrod on a black belt; carbines on a crossbelt of shiny black leather with metal fittins and an iron hook; lances with black shafts and a pennant of light blue with red. In mounted order saddlecloths of the usual cossack pattern made from dark-blue cloth with red trim. Later, on 3 May 1831, cloth saddle pillows were added after the manner of the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiments, and leather flaps [tebenki]; gray valises (Illus. 1247).

Officers were distinguished by the epaulettes prescribed for their ranks, sashes, and other silver appointments (Illus. 1248) (106).

The Teptyar regiments kept this uniform in its entirety up to their disbandment when they were used to form the First Orenburg Cossack Regiment, which took place in 1835 and is referred to above in the descriptions for regiments of the Orenburg Cossack Host.

 

 

VIII. Stavropol Kalmuck Host.
[Stavropol'skoe Kalmytskoe voisko.]

 

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (107).

10 July 1827 - In the Host it is ordered that there be round pompons on the headdress: white for lower ranks and silver for officers (108).

15 November 1829 - This Host, which has had dark-blue jackets of standard cossack cut with a red collar and red piping on the cuffs and dark-blue sharovary pants with red stripes and piping is ordered to have jackets with collar, cuffs, and two shoulder straps (without a number), and sharovary with only a single red stripe. With this change lower ranks are prescribed standard cossack headdresses with a red bag and upper and lower pompons; red stamin girdles; boots without spurs. All other items are to be as for the Teptyar regiments, except for the pistol lanyard which is red with black, and the lance pennant whose upper half is black and lower half red (Illus. 1249).

As in other hosts, officers were distinguished by epaulettes, sashes, and the silver appointments prescribed for their rank (Illus. 1250) (109).

20 January 1832 - Serving officers of the Host are allowed to wear silver buttonhole loops on collar and cuffs, after the example of the Ural and Orenburg Cossack Hosts (Illus. 1251) (110).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given a new pattern sash with a narrow silver lace body with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as established at this time for regular forces (111).

17 December 1837 - An additional, fourth, thin twist of braid is added to officers’ epaulettes, as in the regular forces (112).

29 April 1838 - The changes in uniforms and weaponry promulgated on this date for regiments of the Astrakhan Cossack Host and described above apply in equal measure to the Stavropol Kalmuck Host, except for its prescribed distinctive colors (Illus. 1252). In this Host pennants are removed from the lances (113). Subsequently, nothing in the uniform, arms, or horse furniture of the Stavropol Kalmuck Host underwent any change up to the time of its disbandment and incorporation into the Orenburg Cossack Host, which took place on 24 May 1842.

 

 

IX. Bashkir-Meshcheryak Host.
[Bashkiro-Meshcheryakskoe voisko.]

 

2 October 1829 - With the confirmation of uniform clothing for the Bashkir-Meshcheryak Host, its uniforms are to be according to the following description:

Cossacks of Bashkir cantons.

White cloth cap trimmed on the top seams with black tape and below with red colored cotton material. Black neckcloth of silk or any other material. Dark-blue cloth jacket of cossack style, closed with small hooks, with scarlet piping around the collar and cuffs. Scarlet shoulder straps with the cut-out number of the regiment on yellow cloth; white buttons for these straps. Dark-blue cloth sharovary pants of cossack pattern with single scarlet cloth stripe. Light-blue cotton girdle. Black boots.

Pistol on the left side in a black leather holster secured to the sword belt; for it a black cord with tassels. Small cartridge pouch [podsumok] of shiny black leather on a similar strap over the left shoulder, without fittings; on it an iron ramrod with a black strap wound around it. Carbine on a crossbelt of shiny black leather, with a brass buckle in back, slide, and endpiece, worn over the cartridge pouch; iron hook with spring. Black leather sword belt with two brass buckles. Saber in iron mountings of the pattern for all cavalry regiments. Lance on a black shaft, 4-1/2 arshins [10-1/2 feet] long (including the lance head) (Illus. 1253).

Non-commissioned officers [uryadniki] of Bashkir cantons.

On the coat the collar and cuffs are trimmed with silver galloon; white, black, and orange tassels on the cord; black caps (Illus. 1254).

Officers of Bashkir cantons.

Coats in all respects like those for lower ranks, but cartridge pouch on a black leather belt with silver fittings; sword belt likewise; black plissé headdress, trimmed with silver galloon with a black light; silver scaled epaulettes (Illus. 1255).

All ranks in Bashkir cantons.

Cossack saddle: saddlecloth of cossack style in dark-blue cloth, trimmed along the edges with scarlet cloth over the pad; valise of gray German cloth, secured along with the greatcoat behind the saddle; cossack bridle (Illus. 1253).

Cossacks of Meshcheryak cantons.

Black astrakhan headdress of the pattern for Don Cossacks, 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high, top and bottom trimmed with black plissé, top of scarlet cloth with a bag hanging down the right side; pompon and cockade (lower pompon) of red wool; black leather chinstrap, one finger’s breadth wide. Black silk neckcloth, or of any other material. Dark-blue cloth jacket of ccossack pattern, without piping, closed by small hooks. Shoulder straps of the same cloth with the cut-out number of the regiment on white cloth; white buttons on the straps. Dark-blue cloth sharovary pants of cossack style, with single stripes of scarlet cloth. Black cotton girdle. Black boots.

Pistol on the left side in a black leather holster secured to the sword belt; pistol lanyard with black wool tassels. Cartridge pouch of shiny black leather on a similar belt over the left shoulder, without fittings; iron ramrod wrapped in a black strap. Carbine on a black leather crossbelt with brass fittings behind, consisting of a buckle and endpiece; the crossbelt is worn over the left shoulder over the cartridge pouch; iron hook with spring. Black leather sword belt with two brass buckles. Saber in iron mountings of the pattern for all cavalry regiments. Lance with a black shaft 4-1/2 arshins [10-1/2 feet] long (including the lance head).

Non-commissioned officers of Meshcheryak cantons.

On the coat the collar and cuffs on the sleeves are trimmed with silver galloon; cockade (lower pompon) [kokarda (repeek)] under the upper pompon divided crosswise by dark-gray and white cloth; tassels on the cord colored white, black, and orange (Illus. 1256).

Officers of Meshcheryak cantons.

Uniform like that for lower ranks in all respects, but the cartridge pouch and sword belt have silver fittings; silver scaled epaulettes; silver pompon and cockade (lower pompon) (Illus. 1257).

All ranks in Meshcheryak cantons.

Cossack saddle: saddlecloth of cossack style in dark-blue cloth, trimmed along the edges with scarlet cloth over the pad; valise of gray German cloth, secured along with the greatcoat behind the saddle; bridle and all harness as for cossacks (114).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given a new pattern sash with a narrow silver lace body with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as established at this time for regular forces (115).

17 December 1837 - An additional, fourth, thin twist of braid is added to officers’ epaulettes, as in the regular forces (116).

29 April 1838 - The changes in uniforms, weapons, and accouterments promulgated on this date for the Don, Black Sea, Astrakhan, Ural, and Orenburg Cossack Hosts, described above, are extended to the Bashkir-Meshcheryak Host, except for the Bashkirs’ headdress, which remains unchanged (Illus. 1258 and 1295) (117).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established for the front of the band on officers’ forage caps, as introduced at this time for officers’ caps in regular forces (118).

20 May 1844 - With the general allocation of colors for forage caps within the Military Administration, officers (Bashkir cantons as well as Meshcheryak) are to have caps as for Don Host officers: dark blue with a red band and red piping around the top (119).

27 April 1845 - In the Bashkir-Meshcheryak Host are introduced the same chekmens and pistol cases, and additionally for Meshcheryak cantons—headdress, as established at this time for the Don Host and described above. The chekmens for officers in Bashkir cantons have buttonhole loops as before, while for officers in Meshcheryak cantons they are without buttonhole loops (Illus. 1260 and 1261) (120).

12 February 1846 - It is established that:

1. In Bashkir and Meshcheryak cantons assigned a monetary payment in place of service, no uniforms or any kind of weapons are to be required, and they are allowed to wear their usual clothing.

2. When on cordon duty on the Orenburg Line, Bashkirs and Meshcheryaks in line cantons are allowed to wear their national dress, with uniform clothing required only if part of the host may be sent on external service toward the western or southern borders of the Empire (121).

 

 

X. Siberian Line Cossack Host.
[Sibirskoe Lineinoe Kazach'e voisko.]


REGIMENTS

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (122).

7 January 1829 - In place of their previous gold epaulettes, officers of the Siberian Line Cossack Host are to have silver scaled epaulettes. Instead of shakos, all ranks are to have the headdress prescribed for other cossack hosts (123).

15 November 1829 - Regiments in the Siberian Line Cossack Host are prescribed the same uniforms, arms, and horse furniture as confirmed on this date for the Ural Cossack Host and described above, except with the light-blue color changed everywhere to red and the white numbers on the shoulder straps to yellow. The Siberian Line Cossack Host was further distinguished from other cossack hosts in that instead of a black chinstrap on the headdress, it had white metal chinscales (Illus. 1262 and 1263) (124).

April 1831 - Officers without permanent positions [zauryad-ofitsery] are to have small stamped stars on their epaulettes, like those introduced on 1 January 1827 to distinguish rank (125).

18 February 1837 - In the Siberian Line Cossack Host bridles [uzdechki] are established in place of curb-bits [mundshtuki], after the example of the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment (126).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given a new pattern sash of narrow silver lace with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as for regular forces (127).

17 December 1837 - Officers’ epaulettes are given an additional fourth thin twist of braid (128).

29 April 1838 - The changes in uniforms and weapons promulgated on this date for Don, Astrakhan, Ural, and Orenburg Cossack regiments, described above, are extended with equal force to the regiments of the Siberian Line Cossack Host, which in uniforms and arms, as well as horse furniture, is ordered to conform to the patterns for the cited regiments, except for its prescribed distinctions in colors. Along with this, the previous lance pennants in regiments of the Siberian Line Cossack Host are removed (Illus. 1264) (129).

4 December 1840 - In the Siberian Line Cossack Host the dark-blue color of its uniforms is changed to dark green. Along with this, silver buttonhole loops are established for the collars and cuffs on officers’ jackets, after the example of other cossack hosts (Illus. 1265) (130).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is ordered to be worn on the band on officers’ forage caps in the Orenburg Cossack Host, as established at this same time for officer’ caps in regular forces (131).

20 May 1844 - With the general allocation of colors for forage caps throughout the War Department, dark-green caps are established for the Siberian Lin Cossack Regiments, with a red band and red piping around the top (132).

14 April 1845 - The current chekmens in the Siberian Line Cossack Host are replaced with jackets of the pattern established for Cossack generals when in Host uniform. Officers are ordered to wear pistols with cords only when in formation (133).

27 April 1845 - As a consequence of the change on 14 April 1845 in the uniforms of the Siberian Line Cossack Host, the following uniform is established:

Dark-green chekmen, as before, but in length reaching to 4 vershoks [7 inches] above the knee, with a red edge on the collar and cuffs, and for officers the addition of their prescribed silver buttonhole loops; headdress of black fleece 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high without an indentation on top, with a red cloth bag under which is sewn an oilcloth base; red girdle; pistol lanyard of the previous pattern but sewn to the carrier that is attached to the sword belt on the left side. The rest of the items of uniform clothing and weaponry, as well as horse furniture, remain unchanged (134).

5 December 1846 - A description of the uniforms, weapons, and horse furniture for regiments of the Siberian Line Cossack Host is confirmed:

Officers.

Headdress of black astrakhan with a red cloth crown and a chinstrap. Silver upper pompon. Silver lower pompon [repeek], lined with red cloth. Headdress cover of black lacquered oilcloth. Black silk neckcloth. Dark-green cloth chekmen with red piping around the collar and cuffs, closed with small hooks; silver buttonhole loops of cossack pattern on the collar and cuffs. Dark-green sharovary pants with red stripes. Red silk girdle. White suede gloves. Gray cloth greatcoat with red tabs on a dark-green collar piped red; smooth white metal buttons. Boots with iron spurs. Silver epaulettes with scales, with the regimental number, secured by a white metal button. Silver sash. Silver sword knot on a black leather strap. Forage cap of dark-green cloth with two lines of red piping, with a visor.

Ammunition pouch for 20 rounds in tin holders laid out in one row and lined with black morocco leather; trimmed on the bottom along the seam with thin black silk cord, with a black morocco lid trimmed along the edge with silver lace without a light. Ammunition pouch belt of silver lace without a light, lined with black morocco, 11/16 vershok [1-1/5 inches] wide, with silver buckles, slides, and endpieces. Carrier for stowing the pistol, of black morocco with two flaps, with stitching along the edges, 1-7/8 vershoks [3-1/4 inches] long on the left side, 3-1/2 [6-1/8] on the right; 3 vershoks [5-1/4 inches] wide at the top, 1-1/2 [2-5/8] at the bottom; silver pistol lanyard with one tassel and two slides, length 2 arshins 10 vershoks [73-1/2 inches]. Pistol case of dark-blue cloth to the lower part of the lock, then from the lower part of black morocco. Upwards, to the middle where the cloth ends, and below at the very bottom—trimmed around with silver lace without a light; for tying around the butt—a black silk cord; length of the case 7 vershoks [12-1/4 inches], 3-3/4 [6-1/2] wide at the top, 1-3/4 [3] wide in the middle, and 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] in circumference at the bottom; the lace 3-3/8 vershoks [5-9/10 inches] wide. Sword belt of the pattern established for light cavalry, modified so that the waist strap is whole and the slings sewn to it by means of an oval ring which is only half visible; trimmed with silver lace without a light.

Dark-blue cloth saddlecloth, trimmed along the edges with red tape 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide. Saddle and harness of standard cossack style. Iron stirrups. Dark-green cloth pillow with red tape along the seams. Saddle-pad of sheepskin with a leather cover. Gray cloth valise. Bridle, harness, and chest-band [uzda, pafy i nagrudnik] of rawhide straps with iron fittings and bit. Shashka of the description confirmed on 29 April 1838. Light-cavalry pistol, worn in a carrier on the left side of the waist.

Adjutants of the Government Ataman and Host Duty Officer, as well as brigade adjutants, are prescribed a cossack pattern coat of dark-green cloth with a silver aiguilette; collar of red cloth; two silver buttonhole loops on the collar and cuffs, with brick-colored [bitogo tsveta] piping and girdle. Sharovary pants with red trim; cavalry saber.

Cossacks.

Headdress as for officers. Red wool upper pompon. For cossacks the lower pompon is of red cloth, for non-commissioned officers of cloth striped across with dark gray and white. Cover of black oilcloth. Black cloth neckcloth. Dark-green cloth chekmen with red piping around the collar and cuffs. For trumpeters—with white tape trim after the pattern for regular troops. The collars and cuffs of non-commmissioned officers and staff-trumpeters are trimmed with silver galloon. Dark-green sharovary with red stripes. Red shalloon girdle. Gloves for non-commissioned officers and staff-trumpeters—suede; for cossacks and trumpeters—of dark-green cloth. Gray cloth greatcoat with red tabs on a dark-green collar, with red piping; smooth white metal buttons. Boots with iron spurs. Red cloth shoulder straps with a cut-out regimental number on yellow cloth, secured with a white metal button. Sword knot of red leather. Dark-green forage cap with two rows of red piping, without a visor.

Ammunition pouch for 40 rounds in tin holders laid in two rows, lined with black leather, with a lid of the same leather and stitching along the edges. Crossbelt for the ammunition pouch of black rawhide leather, 3/4 vershoks [1-1/4 inches] wide, with a brass buckle, slide, and endpiece. Carrier for stowing the pistol—of black leather with two side flaps, with stitching along the edges, 4 vershoks [7 inches] long on the left side and 5 [8-3/4] on the right, 4 vershoks [7 inches] wide at the top and 1-3/4 [3] at the bottom; pistol lanyard of red wool with one tassel and two slides, 2 arshins 7 veshoks [68-1/4 inches] long. Pistol case of dark-green cloth to the lower part of the lock, and from the bottom of shiny black leather; on top, in the middle, and toward the bottom trimmed with black tape; for tying around the butt - a red woolen cord with tassel; length of the cases 9-1/2 vershoks [16-5/8 inches], width at the top 3-1/2 [6-1/8] and at the bottom 1-3/4 [3]; below, the circumference of the bottom is 2-1/2 vershoks [4-3/8 inches]; tape on the cases is 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide. Sword belt of shiny black leather with brass buckles; width of the strap - 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches].

Saddlecloth, saddle, cushion, sweat cloth, valise, bridle, harness, chest-band, shashka sword, and pistol—as for officers. Gray cloth saddle blanket.

Cossacks have dragoon muskets without a bayonet and a lance with a black shaft.

Host musicians have uniforms of the pattern for regimental lower ranks. For weapons they are only prescribed the shashka sword.

Reserve cossacks: forage cap - gray cloth with a dark-green band and two rows of red piping; visor, leather. Chekmen of gray cloth, dark-green collar with red piping and buttonhole loops; closed by small hooks. Red shoulder straps with the number of the regiment. Non-commissioned officers have silver galloon on the collar and cuffs. Gray sharovary with red piping. Black cloth neckcloth with a bib. Greatcoat - gray, with white tin buttons; gray collar with red piping and buttonhole loops. Shoulder straps as on the chekmen.

Carbine - of any pattern. Lance with a black shaft. Pistol of any pattern. Shashka or saber, ammunition pouch, sword belt, saddle, sweat cloth, stirrup straps - of the patterns established in the Host. Leather saddle pad. Bridle of rawhide straps. Iron curb-bit.

Noncombatant lower ranks in regiments and the Host administration in general—clerks, medical assistants, guards, bookbinders, printer, and draftsman: dark-green forage cap with the same band, red piping and a visor. Dark-green chekmen with red piping around the collar; closed with small hooks. Red shoulder straps with the regimental number. Silver galloon is sewn around the collar and cuffs of non-commissioned officers. Dark-green sharovary with red piping. Black cloth neckcloth with a bib. Gray greatcoat with a dark-green collar piped red; white buttons. Shoulder straps as on the chekmen.

Lower ranks in the Host craftsmen command and guards have uniforms as for reserve cossacks except for the girdle, which is not prescribed for them (135).

14 April 1851 - In the Siberian Line Cossack Host, in place of the lance buckets of shiny leather prescribed by the equipment table of 5 December 1846 it is ordered to retain the rawhide leather straps already introduced in the Host (136).

19 November 1851 - It is ordered that combatant non-commissioned officers of Siberian Line Cossack Host regiments be armed with muskets. All combatant lower ranks of these regiments are to have dragoon muskets with bayonets (137).

ARTILLERY

(Changes in the numbering of artillery batteries in the Siberian Line Cossack Host are shown in Part I of Volume XIX, Chapter XXXIV of Historical Description of the Clothing and Arms of the Russian Army.)

1 January 1827 - In order to differentiate between ranks, small stamped stars are established for officers’ epaulettes, as for regular forces (138).

7 August 1829 - Epaulettes with scaled fields are established for officers’ uniforms, of the pattern for epaulettes in the regular light cavalry (139).

15 November 1829 - The artillery of the Siberian Line Cossack Host receives the exact same uniforms, weapons, and horse furniture as used at this time in Don horse-artillery companies, with only the replacement of the black chinstrap on the headdress with brass chinscales (Illus. 1268) (140).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given new pattern sashes with narrow silver lace with three stripes of light-orange and black silk, as for regular forces (141).

17 December 1837 - To officers’ epaulettes is added, following the example of the regular forces, a fourth thin twist of braid (142).

29 April 1838 - The changes in uniforms and arms for Don Horse-Artillery batteries, described above, are applied in equal measure to the artillery of the Siberian Line Cossack Host (143).

1 July 1839 - For lower ranks in training detachments of the Siberian Line Cossack Host horse artillery, the cadre of these detachments as well as the personnel rotated annually, there is ordered to have yellow tape around the epaulette, following the pattern confirmed for Instructional troops (144).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established for the band on officers’ forage caps, as introduced for officers’ caps in regular forces (145).

14 April 1845 - The batteries’ previous jackets are replaced with a chekmen. Officers are ordered to wear pistols with cords only when in formation (146).

27 April 1845 - Consequent to the changes in uniform of 14 April 1845 for the Siberian Line Cossack artillery, there are established for its horse-artillery batteries:

Chekmen of dark-green cloth to reach to 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] above the knee, with collar and cuffs of black cloth, and red cloth edging on the collar, cuffs, and down the front opening. Headdress of black astrakhan 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high, without an indentation, with a bag of scarlet cloth, under which is sewn an oilcloth base. Pistol case of the previous pattern but sewn into the holder and secured to the sword belt on the left side. All other items of uniform and weaponry, as well as horse furniture, remain unchanged (147).

5 December 1846 - A description of the uniforms, weapons, and horse furniture for Horse Artillery batteries of the Siberian Host is confirmed:

Officers.

Headdress of black astrakhan with a red cloth crown and a chinstrap. Silver upper pompon. Silver lower pompon [repeek], lined with red cloth. Headdress cover of black lacquered oilcloth. Black silk neckcloth. Dark-green chekmen with black collar and cuffs, and red piping around the collar and cuffs. Dark-green sharovary pants with red stripes. Red silk girdle. White suede gloves. Gray cloth greatcoat with red tabs on a black collar piped red; brass buttons with artillery armature. Boots with iron spurs. Silver epaulettes with scales, with the battery number, secured by a button. Silver sash. Silver sword knot on a black leather strap. Forage cap of dark-green cloth with black band and three rows of piping, with a visor.

Ammunition pouch, pistol carrier, pistol lanyard, saddle, sweat-cloth, valise, shashka sword, and pis, saddle, sweat-cloth, valise, shashka sword, and pistol—of the patterns for Siberian Line Cossack Host regiments. Crossbelt for the ammunition pouch, pistol case, and sword belt—of the patterns for the regiments but with silver lace replaced by gold. Saddlecloth of dark-green cloth, trimmed along the edges with gold galloon piped red. Saddle cushion dark green with gold galloon. Bridle, harness, and chest-band of rawhide straps with brass fittings.

Cossacks.

Headdress, upper and lower pompons, headdress cover, and neckcloth—of the patterns established at this time for regimental cossacks in the Siberian Line Cossack Host. Chekmen the same as in the regiments, except for non-commissioned officers the collar and cuffs are trimmed with gold galloon. Dark-green sharovary with red stripes. Red shalloon girdle. White suede gloves. Raven’s duck stable jacket [kitel'], with covered buttons. Gray greatcoat with red tabs on a black collar piped red; brass buttons with artillery armature. Boots with iron spurs. Brass epaulettes with scales, the battery number in white metal. Sword knot of red leather. Forage cap, ammunition pouch for 20 rounds, its crossbelt, pistol lanyard, pistol case, sword belt, saddle, sweat-cloth, valise, shashka, pistol, and saddle pad—of the patterns established at this time for regiments of the Siberian Line Cossack Host.

Dark-green cloth saddlecloth, trimmed along the edges with a yellow cloth stripe 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide. Dark-green cushion with a yellow stripe along the seams. Bridle, harness, and chest-piece—of rawhide straps with brass fittings.

Noncombatant lower ranks in the artillery brigade have uniforms of the pattern established by the table confirmed on 25 August 1816, supplemented by regulations, i.e. for non-commissioned officers—dark-green cloth forage caps and chekmens; for cossacks—gray cloth forage caps and jackets; for both—gray cloth riding trousers and greatcoats, and so on (148).

8 June 1852 - It is ordered that chekmens in the Siberian Host’s horse-artillery battery be made after the example of chekmens in the Don and Caucasian Cossack artillery, with red edging down the front (149).

Apart from the changes in uniform described here for all units of the Siberian Line Cossack Host, all orders promulgated in regard to the standard general-officer’s uniform and the uniforms for general-adjutants, aides-de-camp of H.I.M., and adjutants to Don Host generals, set forth above in the section for that Host, also apply to the Siberian Line Cossack Host.

 

 

XI. Siberian Town Cossacks and Border Troops
[Sibirskie gorodovye kazach'ya i pogranichnyya voiska].

 

15 January 1829 - All Siberian town cossacks and border troops are given uniform clothing of standard cossack style: jackets and chekmen - dark blue, with red collar and shoulder straps and tin buttons (on the shoulder straps). Gray sharovary pants with red piping. Dark-blue bag on the headdress, likewise dark-blue upper and lower pompons. Black girdle, black accouterments, dark-blue pistol lanyard, tassel, and saddlecloth, the saddlecloth with red trim (Illus. 1269 and 1270).

Officers are prescribed silver epaulettes with scales and a red base, dark-blue girdles, cartridge pouches of shiny black leather and silver mountings, dark-blue saddlecloths with red trim, and other distinctions generally established for officers (Illus. 1271).

Town regiments and border commands are ordere to be distinguished by Cyrillic letters and numerals (cut out on yellow cloth for lower ranks, of gilt metal for officers). In the Tobolsk Regiment - T. B., Siberian Tatar - S. T., Tomsk - Tm., Yeniseisk - Ye., Irkutsk - I., Trans-Baikal - Z., and Yakutsk - Ya.

In border commands under the Troitskosavsk administration: Tsurukhaituevsk - T. I., Kharatsaisk - T. III., and Tunkinsk - T. III.

In other border commands following the same sequence, i.e. the letter T. joined with the numeral allocated to the command (150).

17 December 1837 - A fourth, narrow, twist of braid is added to officers’ epaulettes, after the example of regular forces (151).

22 August 1840 - A description of the uniform and musket of the Yakutsk Town Cossack Regiment is confirmed; headdress of black lambskin, after the style for line cossacks; jacket of dark-green cloth with a red collar and red shoulder straps; dark-green cuffs; on the chest places for 10 cartridges, 5 on each side. Instead of a girdle a belt over the jacket, on which is a bayonet scabbard. Round pouch [suma] of cossack pattern, on the previous crossbelt, for 20 rounds. Sharovary pants of the same pattern (dark-gray cloth from Siberian factories); in the absence of this color then to be made in the St.-Petersburg commissariat from gray factory cloth. Infantry musket with jäger sling (Illus. 1272) (152).

18 February 1842 - For noncombatant lower ranks of the Yakutsk Town Cossack Regiment the same uniform is established as prescribed on 22 August 1840 for its combatant personnel, but made from gray cloth and without weapons (Illus. 1273) (153).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established on the front of officers’ forage cap bands, as for officers’ caps in regular forces (154).

21 October 1849 - Confirmation is given to a description of uniforms and arms:

Tobolsk Cossack Foot Battalion.

Officers.

Headdress of red cloth, rounded top, quilted, trimmed around with wide silver lace and crossed with four strips of thin silver lace; brim of black sheepskin; chinstrap of black leather. Dark-green forage cap with a red band and red piping on top, with a visor. Black silk neckcloth. Dark-green chekmen with red collar and dark-green cuffs; closed with small hooks. The chekmen must be 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] higher than the knee. Silver epaulettes with the Cyrillic letters T. K. B. on a red field; secured by a white metal button. Silver sash. Waistbelt of silver lace backed with black morocco, with a silver buckle fastening in front. Dark-gray sharovary pants with red piping. Gray greatcoat with a collar of the same color with a red tab and red piping; white metal buttons, smooth. Boots without spurs. Shashka sword—according to the description confirmed on 29 April 1838. Cossack sword knot.

Cossacks.

Headdress as for officers except white worsted tape instead of silver lace. Forage cap as for officers but without a visor. Black cloth neckcloth. Chekmen as for officers. For non-commissioned officers the collar and cuffs have the usual silver army galloon. For hornists the chest, sleeves, back, and shoulder wings are trimmed with white tape as in regular forces. Red cloth shoulder straps with the letters T. K. B. cut out on yellow cloth. Waistbelt of shiny black leather 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide; fastened in front with a single buckle; bayonet scabbard secured to the waistbelt. Cartridge pouch [podsumok] of black Russian leather, for 20 rounds; worn at the waist by means of leather straps in such a manner that it may be freely moved all around the waist. (Hornists are not authorized.) Dark-gray sharovary with red piping. Soldier pattern greatcoat, gray, with a similarly colored collar with red tabs; white metal buttons, smooth.

The musket for cossacks and non-commissioned officers is the infantry pattern with a bayonet. The sling, lock cover, and flint case are as for infantry. Knapsack of calf leather, closed with three iron buckles; on a black crossbelt of black Russian leather 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide, worn over the right shoulder after the example of Black Sea foot cossack battalions.

Noncombatant ranks - clerks, medical assistants, and barbers are prescribed a forage cap, chekmen, sharovary, neckcloth, and greatcoat of the battalion pattern.

Tobolsk Horse Cossack Regiment.

Officers.

Headdress of red cloth, rounded top, quilted, trimmed around with wide silver lace and crossed with four strips of thin silver lace; brim of black sheepskin; chinstrap of black leather. Dark-green forage cap with a red band and red piping on top, with a visor. Black silk neckcloth. Dark-green chekmen with red collar and dark-green cuffs; closed with small hooks. The chekmen must be 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] higher than the knee. Dark-gray sharovary pants with leather reinforcements [kozhanya stremyanki] and red piping. Dark-green silk girdle. Silver epaulettes with scales, of the confirmed pattern, secured with a white metal button, with the Cyrillic letters T. K. P. Silver sash. Cavalry sword knot. Sword belt of silver lace without a light, backed with black morocco.

Ammunition pouch of black morocco with a similar lid, for 20 rounds. Pistol carrier of black morocco with two side flaps, stitched along the sides, 1-7/8 [3-1/4 inches] vershoks long on the left side and 3-1/2 [6-1/8] on the right, 3 vershoks [5-1/4 inches] wide at the top, 1-1/2 [2-5/8] below. Silver pistol lanyard, with one tassel and two slides, 2 arshins 10 vershoks [73-1/2 inches] long.

Saddlecloth of dark-green cloth, trimmed along the edges with a red stripe 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide. Saddle of cossack pattern, with iron stirrups. Saddle pad of black leather, with the same piping. Sweat-cloth of sheep’s wool with leather cover. Gray cloth valise. Bridle with two reins and brass fittings.

Shashka sword—according to the description confirmed on 29 April 1838. Cavalry pistol, worn in a carrier at the left side of the waist.

Cossacks.

Headdress as for officers except with white worsted tape. Forage cap as for officers but without a visor. Black cloth neckcloth. Chekmen as for officers. For non-commissioned officers the collar and cuffs have the usual silver galloon. Sharovary as for officers. Dark-green girdle of shalloon. Gloves for non-commissioned officers—white suede, for cossacks—dark-green cloth. Greatcoat as in the infantry battalion. Boots with iron spurs. Red shoulder straps with the Cyrillic letters T.K.P. cut out on yellow cloth. Sword belt of black rawhide leather.

Ammunition pouch [patrontash] of black Russian leather with a similar lid, for 20 rounds. Pistol carrier of black leather with two flaps, with stitching along the sides, 4 vershoks [7 inches] long on the left side and 5 [8-3/4] on the right, 4 vershoks wide at the top and 1-3/4 [3 inches] wide at the bottom. pistol lanyard of red wool, with a tassel and two slides, 2 arshins 7 vershoks [68-1/4 inches] long.

Saddlecloth, saddle, cushion, sweat-cloth, valise, shashka, and pistol—as for officers. Bridle with halter and no fittings. Lance with a black shaft and iron spearhead and endpiece.

Noncombatant ranks - clerks and medical assistants are prescribed forage caps, chekmen, sharovary, neckcloth, and greatcoat of the regimental patterns (155).

4 January 1851 - Confirmation is given to a description of uniforms and weapons for the Irkutsk and Yeniseisk Cossack Horse Regiments.

Officers.

Headdress of red cloth, rounded top, quilted, trimmed around with wide silver lace and crossed with four strips of thin silver lace; brim of black sheepskin; chinstrap of black leather. Dark-green forage cap with a red band and red piping on top, with a visor. Black silk neckcloth. Dark-green chekmen with red collar and dark-green cuffs; closed with small hooks. The chekmen must be 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] higher than the knee. Black velvet cartridge-holder [napatronnik], with internal pockets, trimmed around with wide silver lace; tube of Karelian birch with silvered caps; each cartridge-holder for 8 rounds. Gray sharovary pants with leather reinforcements [kozhanya stremyanki] and red piping. Waistbelt of silver lace 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide, backed with black morocco, with double and small buckles, endpiece, and slide. White suede gloves. Gray greatcoat with similarly colored collar with red tabs; white buttons, metal, smooth. Boots with iron spurs. Silver epaulettes with scales, with the Cyrillic letters I. P. for the Irkutsk Regiment and Ye. P. for the Yeniseisk. Cavalry sword knot. Sword belt of silver lace without a light, backed with black morocco.

Cavalry pistol, worn at the left side of the waist. Pistol carrier of black morocco with two side flaps, stitching along the sides, 1-7/8 [3-1/4 inches] vershoks long on the left side and 3-1/2 [6-1/8] on the right, 3 vershoks [5-1/4 inches] wide at the top, 1-1/2 [2-5/8] below. Silver pistol lanyard with one tassel and two slides, 2 arshins 10 vershoks [73-1/2 inches] long. Shashka sword according to the description confirmed on 29 April 1838.

The saddle consists of a tree, girth, stirrup straps with stirrups, sweat-cloth, crupper, surcingle, and cover with cushion. Cover and cushion of black leather, trimmed along the edges with red morocco and silver galloon. Bridle of rawhide leather, with brass fittings. Halter made from a rawhide strap. Cossack nagaika whip.

Cossacks.

Headdress as for officers except with white worsted tape instead of sliver lace. Forage cap as for officers but without a visor. Black cloth neckcloth. Chekmen as for officers. For non-commissioned officers the collar and cuffs are trimmed with silver galloon. Black leather cartridge-holder with internal pockets, trimmed with black tap and black cord; birch tubes with white bone caps, each cartridge-holder for 8 rounds. Sharovary as for officers. Waistbelt of black leather 6/8 vershoks [1-1/4 inches] wide, with iron fittings. Suede gloves for non-commissioned officers, and for cossacks—of dark-green cloth. Soldier pattern greatcoat, gray, with an identically colored collar with red tabs; white metal buttons, smooth. Boots with iron spurs. Red cloth shoulder straps with the Cyrillic letters I.P and Ye.P. cut out on yellow cloth. Black sword belt. of rawhide leather, worn over the shoulder.

Ammunition pouch [patrontash] of black Russian leather with a similar lid, for 40 rounds, of the pattern for His Royal Highness the Crown Prince of Württemberg’s Dragoon Regiment. Its crossbelt—of black rawhide leather 6/8 vershoks wide.

Infantry musket with bayonet, which is worn in a scabbard on the shashka sword. Musket sling and shashka—according to the description confirmed on 29 April 1838. Case for musket—of leather prepared with the hair side outwards. Iron lance head on a black shaft. Saddle as for officers but without galloon trim. Bridle with halter tie-rope and no fittings. Halter and nagaika whip as for officers.

Clerks and medical assistants are prescribed forage caps, chekmen, sharovary, neckcloth, and greatcoat of the regimental patterns (156).

17 March 1851 - Uniforms and weapons are confirmed for the Russian mounted regiments of the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host, in all respects completely like those for the Irkutsk and Yeniseisk regiments, with the only difference being that on officers’ epaulettes and lower ranks’ shoulder straps there is the regimental number and the Cyrillic letter Z (157).

21 July 1851 - Confirmation is given to a description of uniforms and weapons for foot battalions of the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host.

Officers.

Headdress of dark-green cloth, rounded top, quilted, trimmed aroundwith wide silver lace and crossed with four strips of thin silver lace; fur brim; chinstrap of black leather. Dark-green forage cap with red piping on top, with a visor. Black silk neckcloth. Dark-green chekmen with a red piping on the collar and cuffs; closed with small hooks. The chekmen must be 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] higher than the knee. Silver epaulettes on a red field, with the battalion number, secured with a white metal button. Sword belt of silver lace 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide, backed with black morocco, with silver double and small buckles, endpiece, and slides. Gray sharovary pants without piping.

Officer pattern greatcoat, gary, with a collar of the same color piped red; white metal buttons, smooth. Boots without spurs. Shashka sword according to the description confirmed 29 April 1838. Infantry sword knot. Sword belt over the shoulder, of silver lace without a light, backed with black morocco with silver fittings.

Cavalry pistol. Pistol carrier of black morocco, worn behind at the waist. Dark-green cloth case. Silver cord.

Cossacks.

Headdress as for officers except with white worsted tape instead of silver lace. Forage cap without a visor. Black cloth neckcloth. Chekmen as for officers. For non-commissioned officers the collar and cuffs are trimmed with silver army galloon. For drummers the breast, sleeves, back, and shoulder wings are trimmed with white tape as in regular forces. Dark-green shoulder straps with red piping and the battalion number on yellow cloth. Waistbelt and sharovary as for officers, but the waistbelt with iron fittings. Soldier pattern greatcoat, gray, with a collar of the same color piped red, with a white metal button. For winter a half-length fur coat [polushubok] over the chekmen.

Musket—infantry pattern for cossacks and non-commissioned officers, with bayonet; bayonet scabbard hung from the waistbelt as in Black Sea Cossack battalions. Musket sling, lock cover, and flint case of infantry patterns. For cossacks and non-commissioned officers a ammunition pouch of black Russian leather for 40 rounds, after the pattern for Black Sea foot battalions; crossbelt of black rawhide 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide. Knapsack of calf-skin, closed with three iron buckles, on a black crossbelt of rawhide leather 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide, worn over the right shoulder as in Black Sea Cossack battalions. Standard cavalry pistol (for drummers); its carrier of black Russian leather, worn behind at the waist; dark-green cloth case; black worsted cord.

Noncombatant lower ranks are prescribed a forage cap, chekmen, sharovary, neckcloth, and greatcoat of the patterns established for the battalion (158).

6 March 1852 - Changes are confirmed for the uniforms of personnel in the Tobolsk Foot Cossack Battalion and Tobolsk Horse Cossack Regiment (Illus. 1274).

Tobolsk Foot Cossack Battalion.

Headdress (for lower ranks)—the top trimmed with thread tape [nityanaya tes'ma] instead of worsted. Chekmen (for officers and lower ranks), red piping of chancellery cloth [kantselyarskoe sukno] around the top of the cuffs. Waistbelt (for lower ranks) closed by a black iron plate buckle, as in Caucasus forces. Cartridge pouch [podsumok] (for lower ranks) replaced by ammunition pouch [patrontash] for 40 rounds (of the pattern confirmed for the Caucasus Sapper and Rifle battalions); ammunition pouch worn over the left shoulder on a strap of Russian leather polished black; strap 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide.

In the case of the battalion being armed with percussion muskets, then a firing-cap pouch will be sewn to the ammunition pouch under the lid, as in the Caucasus forces. Knapsack (for lower ranks)—worn on two straps: the straps of Russian leather polished black, 1 vershok [1-3/4 inches] wide, worn crosswise over the chest, as in Black Sea Cossack battalions. To the knapsack is secured: for men of the 1st and 3rd ranks—mess tins; for the middle rank—kettles. The greatcoat is rolled on top of the knapsack in the infantry manner. Straps for securing the mess tins and kettles, as well as greatcoats, are to be of the same leather as the knapsack straps; the mess-tin strap 1/2 vershok [7/8 inches] wide, and that for the kettle 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches].

In the case of the battalion being armed with percussion muskets, a slit flap for a small iron case for spare firing caps will be made under the top flap of the knapsack.

Tobolsk Horse Cossack Regiment.

Headdress (for lower ranks)—thread tape on top instead of worsted. Chekmen with red piping along the top of the cuffs. In the case of the regiment being armed with percussion muskets, then a firing-cap pouch will be sewn to the ammunition pouch under the lid, as in the Caucasus forces (159).

6 August 1853 - Changes are confirmed in the previous descriptions of arms and uniforms of the Irkutsk and Yeniseisk Horse Cossack Regiments, and also the horse regiments and foot battalions of the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host.

Irkutsk and Yeniseisk Horse Cossack Regiments (Illus. 1275).

Officers.

Headdress of red cloth, rounded top, quilted, height from the brim 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches], trimmed around with wide silver lace and crossed with four strips of thin silver lace Brim of black sheepskin; its width including the wool 3 vershoks [5-1/4 inches]; chinstrap of black Russian leather 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, fastened with a small hook. Forage cap and neckcloth as before. Dark-green cloth chekmen with red collar and dark-green cuffs, with red piping on the cuffs, closed with small hooks; rear skirts at the back folded in pleats [slozheny sborkami]; collar lined with dark-green cloth; skirts to 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] above the knee.

Black velvet cartridge holder with internal pockets trimmed around with wide silver lace; tubes of Karelian birch with silvered caps; each cartridge holder for 8 rounds; a silver cord is passed through the caps and fastened with a hook to a small silvered plate that is secured by this hook to a thread buttonhole loop on the breast. Sharovary—of gray cloth with red piping, with pockets; instead of one strap on the lower legs leather footstraps are sewn, with two bone toggles for fastening, after the manner of cavalry riding trousers.

Waistbelt, gloves, greatcoat, boots, epaulettes, sword knots, pistol, pistol lanyard, shashka, saddle, bridle, and halter are left as before. Sword belt of silver lace without a light, backed with black morocco, with silver fittings, worn over the shoulder. Holder for stowing the pistol—of black morocco with two side flaps and edging of black morocco, 1-7/8 [3-1/4 inches] vershoks long on the left side and 3-1/2 [6-1/8] on the right, 3 vershoks [5-1/4 inches] wide at the top, 1-1/2 [2-5/8] below, with a leather tube 4 vershoks [7 inches] long and, sewn to the tube, dark-green cloth 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] long, with a silver cord 9-1/2 vershoks [16-5/8 inches] long, with tassels like those for cossack officers.

Plaited nagaika whip made from a rawhide strap, 9 vershoks [15-3/4 inches] long, with a rawhide tip and wooden handle 7 vershoks [12-1/4 inches] long; 1 vershok [1-3/4 inches] from the end of the handle a rawhide strap is passed.

Cossacks.

Headdress of red chancellery cloth with a canvas lining; for non-commissioned officers the top is trimmed around with white thread tape 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, and with narrow tape 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide laid crosswise; for cossacks only the crosswise narrow tape. Brim as for officers; chinstrap of black Russian leather, 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide; on the chinstrap’s right side is sewn a similar leather toggle, and a slit is cut on the left. Forage cap and neckcloth remain unchanged. The previous chekmen: linen lining sewn in from the collar to the waist; rank insignia in white tape sewn onto the shoulder straps. Black leather cartridge holder, with internal pockets, trimmed around with black tape 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide at the bottom and 1/2 [7/8] at the top; similar wide tape is sewn around the cloth; birch tubes with white bone caps; each cartridge holder to fit 8 rounds. Through the caps is passed a black cord that is fastened with small hooks to a brass-tin [mednoluzhennaya] plate. The plate is secured to the breast with a thread buttonhole loop. Sharovary as for officers, of gray army cloth, lined with linen; under the waist and 2-1/2 vershoks [4-3/8 inches] below to the right is sewn a pocket of the same linen lining. Waistbelt, gloves, and boots are unchanged. Soldier pattern greatcoat, of gray cloth, collar of the same with red tabs; red cloth shoulder straps with the Cyrillic letters I. P. or Ye. P. cut through and backed with yellow cloth. Tabs on the greatcoat collar, rear cinches, and front opening as in the cavalry; tin buttons, smooth. Rank insignia of white tape. The greatcoat must be 4 vershoks [7 inches] from the ground. Sword belt of black rawhide leather, 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, with iron fittings, two rings, three buckles, and an endpiece, passed through an iron slide; sword belt worn of the shoulder.

Pistol as for officers, authorized only for non-commissioned officers and trumpeters. Holder of shiny black leather with two flaps and edging of black leather, 4 vershoks [7 inches] long on the left side and 5 [8-3/4] on the right, 4 vershoks wide at the top and 1-3/4 [3 inches] wide at the bottom, with a leather tube 4 vershoks [7 inches] long, and sewn to it dark-green cloth 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] long; cord of red wool, 2 arshins 7 vershoks [68-1/4 inches] long; for non-commissioned officers with a multicolored tassel and two similarly colored, for cossacks with a red tassel and a similar slide. Ammunition pouch of black Russian leather with a similar lid, for 40 rounds. In the Irkutsk Regiment with tin tubes and in the Yeniseisk Regiment with iron, after the pattern for His Royal Highness the Crown Prince of Württemberg’s Dragoon Regiment.

Shashka sword as for officers; two brass rings are affixed to it to hang the bayonet scabbard, after the manner for dragoon shashkas.

Infantry musket with bayonet, the latter worn in a scabbard on the shashka; small bracket for the sling positioned as on dragoon muskets so that it may be worn behind the back when in mounted order. Musket case of calfskin leather with the hair outwards, lined inside with gray cloth; a slit is made underneath to allow the musket to be inserted, edged with leather. For 12 vershoks [21 inches] along the slit is sewn a slide 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide, through which passes a strap for fastening to a brass buckle sewn to a second slide 8-1/2 vershoks [15 inches] from the first, 1 arshin 6 vershoks [38-1/2 inches long and 3/4 [1-1/4] wide; 6 vershoks [10-1/2 inches] inside the slit, where the musket lock would lie, black leather is sewn onto the gray cloth for 4-1/2 vershoks [7-7/8 inches], so that the cloth does not wear through; on this same cloth is also sewn a leather toggle with a small loop for closing the slit. Lance, saddle, bridle, and halter—as before. Nagaika as for officers.

Foot battalions of the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host (Illus. 1276).

Officers.

Headdress of dark-green cloth, round at the top, quilted, trimmed around with wide silver lace and with four narrow strips of lace laid crosswise, also silver; brim of black dog hair, or other type of fur more easily found where the host is located; chinstrap of black leather 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide. Dark-green forage cap, with two lines of piping around the top and above the band, with a visor. Dark-green chekmen with red piping along the collar and cuffs, closed with small hooks; 4 pleats behind and at the sides, on each side, with pockets between the pleats; skirts to 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] of the knee. Black velvet cartridge holder on the chest, trimmed around with wide silver lace, and on the black morocco bottom with narrow silver lace; holders for 6 cartridges on each side of the chest, of Karlian birch in silver mountings, with the same chains to fasten to the chekmen as for Black Sea foot cossack battalions. Neckcloth, epaulettes, and waistbelt—as before. Gray sharovary without piping, with two pockets. Summer sharovary of fine white linen, with a sewn-on belt of the same and two pockets, in all respects similar to the winter sharovary. Greatcoat as before. Army infantry boots.

Shashka, sword knot, and sword belt—as before.

Cavalry pistol. Holder of black morocco, worn at the waist on the left side, next to the shashka. Case with an upper part of dark-green cloth; trimmed around the closure with narrow silver lace; the lower part of black morocco; trimmed with the same lace where the leather joins the cloth and at one end; closed with a black silk cord with tassel. Silver pistol lanyard.

Cossacks.

Headdress as for officers. For non-commissioned officers the top is trimmed around with white thread tape, and has the same tape but narrow, only 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide, laid crosswise; for cossacks only the crosswise narrow tape.

For the detachment with the Instructional Regiment the brim is made of black sheep’s fleece. The forage cap is as for officers but without a visor. Chekmen as for officers: the collar and body of the chekmen lined with linen down to the waist; for non-commissioned officers the collar and cuffs are trimmed with silver army infantry galloon; dark-green cloth shoulder straps with red piping and the battalion number cut out on yellow cloth. Neckcloth, waistbelt, and boots—as before. Winter sharovary gray, without piping, lined with linen; summer sharovary of army Flemish linen, with the same sewn-on waistbelt and two pockets made from linen. Soldier pattern greatcoat, of gray cloth, a collar of the same, dark-green cloth shoulder straps with the battalion number on yellow cloth; collar and shoulder straps with piping of red crepe cloth; collar lined with linen, the shoulder straps with gray cloth; smooth tin buttons.

Infantry musket with bayonet, also prescribed for non-commissioned officers; bayonet scabbard hung on the waistbelt, after the manner of Black Sea Cossack battalions. Musket sling and flint case—of Russian leather polished black, after the example of regular troops. Lock cover—as for infantry. Ammunition pouch of black Russian leather, with spaces for 40 rounds, of the pattern for Caucasus sappers; worn over the left shoulder on a crossbelt of white Russian leather under black polish, 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inch] wide.

Infantry knapsack of calfskin with straps of Russian leather polished black, 1 vershok [1-3/4 inch] wide, worn crosswise on the chest after the manner of Tobolsk cossacks. An iron pot it secured to the knapsack, and on top a greatcoat rolled in the infantry fashion, also as for Tobolsk cossack; the straps for securing pots and greatcoats are made from the same leather as for knapsack straps; pot straps are 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, greatcoats straps 3/4 [1-1/4].

Drummers: headdress, forage cap, neckcloth, waistbelt, winter and summer sharovary, greatcoat, boots, and knapsack—as for cossacks. Chekmen—the same, but trimmed with white army tape, without a light, on the breast, sleeves, and shoulder wings of musicians of non-commissioned officer rank, and along the back seams, as for Black Sea Cossack battalions. Cartridge-holder on the chest of black leather, trimmed around with wide dark-green worsted tape; the bottom with narrow tape. The cartridge-holders on each side of the chest are for 6 rounds of white tin attached to black cords passed through an identical cord secured to the chekmen, in the same way as for Black Sea Cossack battalions. Drummer’s crossbelt—of white Russian leather under black polish, of the pattern for jäger regiments, 2-1/2 vershoks [4-3/4 inches] wide.

Pistol—cavalry pattern. Carrier—of shiny black leather, the same pattern as for Black Sea Cossack battalions, worn at the waist between the knapsack and left thigh, with the butt turned under the left hand. Pistol case—the upper part of dark-green army cloth lined with canvas, at the closure trimmed with narrow dark-green worsted tape; the lower part of shiny black leather; trimmed with the same tape where the cloth and leather join; closed with a black worsted cord with tassel. pistol lanyard—black worsted.

Russian horse regiments of the Trans-Baikal Host (Illus. 1277).

Officers.

Headdress of red cloth, round at the top, quilted, 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] high from the brim, trimmed around with wide silver lace and crossed with four strips of narrow silver lace; brim of black dog hair or other type of fur, 3 vershoks [5-1/4 inches] wide; chinstrap of black Russian leather 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, fastened with a small hook. Dark-green cloth chekmen, with red collar and dark-green cuffs, red piping on the cuffs; closed with small hooks down to the waist; folded pleats behind on the skirts; collar lined with dark-green cloth; skirts to 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] of the knees.

Cartridge-holder of black velvet, with internal pockets, trimmed around with wide silver lace; tubes of Karelian birch, with silvered caps; each cartridge-holder for 8 rounds; a silver cord is passed through the caps, as in the Irkutsk and Yeniseisk Horse Regiments.

Gray sharovary with red piping and pockets; instead of one strap on the lower legs leather footstraps are sewn, with two bone toggles for fastening, after the manner of cavalry riding trousers. Forage cap, neckcloth, waistbelt, gloves, greatcoat, boots, epaulettes, sword knot, sword belt, pistol, cord, shashka, saddle, bridle, and halter—remain unchanged. Nagaika and carrier for stowing the pistol—of the patterns established for the Irkutsk and Yeniseisk regiments.

Cossacks.

Headdress as for officers; for non-commissioned officers the top is trimmed around with white thread tape 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide, and with narrow tape 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide laid crosswise; for cossacks only the crosswise narrow tape; chinstrap of black Russian leather 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] wide; on the chinstrap’s right side is sewn a similar leather toggle, and a slit is cut on the left. Chekmen of the same pattern as for officers; from the collar down to the waist lined with linen; for non-commissioned officers the collar and cuffs are trimmed with silver cavalry galloon; shoulder straps of light-blue army cloth with the regimental number cut out on yellow cloth; rank distinctions of white tape.

Forage cap, neckcloth, waistbelt, gloves, boots, pistol, ammunition pouch, crossbelt, musket, lance, saddle, bridle, and halter—remain unchanged.

Cartridge-holder on the chekmen, sharovary pants, sword belt, holder for stowing the pistol, cord, musket case, and nagaika whip—of the patterns established for the Irkutsk and Yeniseisk regiments.

Greatcoat—of soldier pattern, gray cloth, with a collar of the same with red tabs; shoulder straps of light-blue army cloth with the regimental number cut out on yellow cloth. Tabs on the greatcoat collar, rear cinches, and front opening as in the cavalry; smooth tin buttons. Rank insignia of white tape, according to pattern. The greatcoat must reach to 4 vershoks [7 inches] from the ground (160).

6 January 1854 - Confirmation is given to a description of saddles and full horse furniture for Russian horse regiments of the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host.

The saddle consists of an saddle-tree, girth, stirrup straps with stirrups, chestband, crupper, sweat-cloth, and cases with cushion. The arch is standard cossack style, the upper part with black leather and glue; both sides are fastened to two straps to which the chestband and girth attatch. Girth 1 arshin 9 vershoks [43-3/4 inches] long, 1-1/8 vershok [2 inches] wide; iron buckles are sewn to it from both sides. The second girth, or outer surcingle, is of the same width but 2-3/4 arshins [77 inches] long, so that it goes entirely around the horse through the saddle. The stirrup straps hang from the arch on both sides in front of the surcingle; they are rawhide straps, doubled over, with iron buckles, 2-1/2 arshins [70 inches] long and 1-1/4 [2-3/16] wide, onto which are fastened the iron stirrups. At both the front and rear arches of the tree are affixed three narrow rawhide straps with iron buckles for securing the full campaign load. The chestband is of normal cossack straps 7/8 vershok [1-1/2 inches] wide. Standard cossack crupper, 7/8 vershok wide.

The sweat-cloth is of standard cossack style made of wool felt, with a leather cover; 15 vershoks [26-1/4 inches] long in the center, 13-1/2 [23-1/4] wide in front and 1 arshin 2-1/2 vershoks [32-1/2 inches] at the rear; the lower 2 layers in front are trimmed with leather, and the upper two layers are sewn to the end of the leather cover, on each side of which is a shiny leather slide through which to pass load straps.

Case to cover the saddle-tree—of black calfskin, made from two halves; the middle seam sewn with leather; the edges of the top part trimmed with red morocco stripes 1 vershok [1-3/4 inches] wide, and for officers—additionally with silver galloon. Openings are made through which to pass load straps: 3 in the front and 3 in the rear, and 2 on the sides for the stirrup straps. The case is 1 arshin [28 inches] wide in front, 1 arshin 2-1/2 vershoks [32-1/2 inches] at the back, and 1 arshin long.

Cushion of black calfskin leather, sewn from two halves, sewn around with red morocco stripes and edges, and for officers—also with silver galloon. All four corners are rounded. The cushion is 9-1/2 vershoks [16-5/8 inches] long in the middle, 8 [14] wide in front, and 10 [17-1/2] wide in the rear. In the middle of the cushion is an opening with a tab; the tab is 6-3/4 vershoks [11-1/8 inches] long and 1 [1-3/4] wide; on the tab are punched 6 small holes for securing a small rawhide strap.

Bridle—normal cossack style, of rawhide leather, with brass fittings for officers, for cossacks with buckles and iron bit without fittings.

Valise—of gray cloth, after the patten for the Tobolsk Horse Cossack Regiment. In a cossack valise there are stowed, starting from the right side: smock, 2 shirts, wool socks, neckcloth, earmuffs, linen pants. From the left side: sharovary, foot wraps, rusk sack, and bag for groats and salt (161).

19 March 1854 - In a supplement to the confirmed description of uniforms for horse regiments of the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host, announced in an order from the Minister of War on 6 August 1853, the trumpeters of these regiments are ordered to have: chekmen trimmed with white tape, as is general for trumpeters in cossack hosts; cartridge-holders on the breast according to the pattern confirmed for regiments of the Trans-Baikal Host (each of 8 wooden tubes with bone caps, through which passes a worsted cord from underneath the small plate); pockets for the tubes are trimmed with four rows of white tape, of which the last row goes along the bottom of the pockets; under the pockets and along the sides there is the same tape. The cartridge-holder is to be sewn onto the breast in a straight line, 2-1/2 vershoks 4-1/2 inches] from the collar down the front opening, from the opening to the tubes at the top 1-1/8 [2], at the bottom 3/4 [1-1/4], andfrom the front end of the shoulder wing to the cartridge-holder’s tape 1 [1-3/4]. Signal trumpets are made in the same tone as brass light cavalry trumpets, 8-1/2 vershoks [14-7/8 inches] long including the mouthpiece, wrapped with four-sided white cord (as is general in the cavalry), with similar tassels. For staff-trumpeters and non-commissioned officer trumpeters the tassels have orange and black lights (162).

XII. Little-Russian Cossack Regiments.
[Marlorossiiskie kazachie polki.]

 

6 May 1831 - Along with the order to form eight mounted regiments from Little-Russian cossacks in Chernigov and Poltava provinces under the titles of 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Little-Russian Cossack Regiments, it is ordered that each cossack in these regiments be provided from local public resources with a cloth half-caftan, one pair of cloth sharovary pants and two linen pairs of drawers, a greatcoat, black cap of sheep’s fleece, black cloth neckcloth, three shirts and two pairs of boots, a flask for water, rope lasso 10 sazhens [70 feet] long, bags, a small cloth valise, nagaika whip, and a lance of forged iron.

Arms—saber with sword belt, cartridge pouch [lyadunka] with crossbelt, and one pistol, all being ordered to be provided by the government. The uniforms for these regiments are prescribed to be dark green with red piping on collar and cuffs, and with white appointments (Illus. 1278). Officers are ordered to have silver epaulettes with scales, with small gilt stars and the number of the regiment (Illus. 1279). Cossacks are allowed to be dressed in gray cloth at first (with the regimental number on the shoulder straps), but officers must have the established uniform immediately (163).

18 May 1838 - For the 1st and 2nd Little-Russian Cossack Regiments, remaining after the disbandment of the others, shashkas are established in place of sabers (Illus. 1280), and afterward the their uniform and arms did not change, for the 2nd Regiment up to 1839, and for the 1st to 1842, when they became part of the Caucasian Line Cossack Host (164)

 

XIII. Danube Cossack Host.
[Dunaiskoe kazach'e voisko.]

 

16 March 1837, 29 April 1838 - The Danube Cossack Host is prescribed uniforms, accouterments, and weapons, as well as horse furniture, as for the Don Host, with only the red cloth used a distinction changed to light blue [svetlosinii] cloth, and red tape and cords—to light blue (Illus. 1281 and 1282) (165).

2 January 1844 - There is to be a metallic cockade on the capband of officers’ forage caps, as established at this same time for officers’ caps in the regular forces (166).

20 May 1844 - With the general allocation of forage cap colors throughout the Military Administration, in the Danube Cossack Host forage caps are to be dark blue [sinii], with a light-blue band and light-blue piping around the top (167).

13 December 1844 - By an administrative regulation confirmed on this date for the Danube Cossack Host, its uniforms, weapons, and horse equipment remain unchanged, but described in all details.

Lower ranks in regiments.

Headdress of black astrakhan with a light-blue cloth bag and chinstrap. White upper pompon, of wool, with light-blue cloth lining on the lower pompon. Black neckcloth. Jacket of dark-blue cloth with light-blue piping along the collar and cuffs. Dark-blue cloth sharovary pants with light-blue stripes. Girdle—of light-blue shalloon. Gray cloth greatcoat with a collar of the same with light -blue tabs. Boots with iron spurs. Dark-blue shoulder straps with light-blue piping and the regimental number, with a white metal button. Sword knot of black leather. Dark-blue cloth forage cap, with band and piping of light-blue cloth, without a visor.

Ammunition pouch for 40 rounds in iron pockets laid out in 2 rows, with black leather sewn around, and lid of the same leather, and stitching along the edges. The cartridge-carrier crossbelt is a black rawhide strap 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide, with brass buckles, slides, and endpieces. Carrier for stowing the pistol—of black leather with two side flaps and stitching along the edges; 4 vershoks [7 inches] long on the left side and 5 [8-3/4] on the right; the width at the top 4 vershoks [7 inches], and at the bottom 1-3/4 [3]. Pistol lanyard of dark-blue wool, with one tassel and two slides, 2 arshins 7 vershoks [68-1/4 inches] long.

Pistol case—of dark-blue cloth to the lower part of the firelock, of shiny black leather from that part; above, where the cloth ends, it is trimmed around with dark-blue tape; for closure around the butt there is a dark-blue wool cord with tassel; the case is 9-1/2 vershoks [16-5/8 inches] long, 3-1/2 [6-1/8] wide at the bottom and 1-3/4 [3] in the middle, the circumference of the bottom is 2-1/2 vershoks [4-3/8 inches]; tape on the cases is 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide. Sword belt of shiny black leather with three brass buckles; width of the strap - 6/8 vershok [1-1/4 inches].

Saddlecloth of dark-blue army cloth with canvas lining, trimmed on the edges with light-blue cloth tape 7/8 vershok [1-1/2 inches] wide; on the rear corners of the saddlecloth is the same tape, 9-1/2 vershoks [16-5/8 inches] in length. Cushion of dark-blue army cloth with canvas lining, trimmed around the seam with light-blue cloth tape 7/8 vershok [1-1/2 inches] wide.

Valise of gray army cloth with canvas lining, four white metal buttons, and the regimental number; the valise is 14-1/2 vershoks [24-1/2 inches] long, the circumference of the ends is 12-3/4 vershoks [22-1/3 inches].

Saddle with appurtenences in the usual cossack style. Bridle, crupper, and chestband—without any fittings. Sweat-cloth with cover—of fine white felt in five layers, covered on top, reinforced below with black calf-skin. Pack strap [v'yuchnyi remen'] of black rawhide with a brass buckle, 1 arshin 7 vershoks [40-1/4 inches] long.

Shashka sword—brass handle, bands with rings, and endpiece; wooden scabbard wrapped with black leather. Pistol of the pattern adopted by the cavalry, worn in a carrier fastened behind on the sword belt. Musket and sling according to the pattern confirmed 28 April 1838. Musket case of shaggy black felt with a sling made from a black rawhide strap 5/8 vershok [1-1/10 inches] wide. Horse cloth—of gray cloth. Lance with a black shaft (Illus. 1283).

Non-commissioned officers and clerks have white galloon on the collar and cuffs.

Officers.

Silver upper pompon on the headdress, light-blue cloth lining on the lower pompon. Dark-blue cloth jacket; silver buttonhole loops on the collar and cuffs with light-blue piping. Dark-blue cloth chekmen, with collar of the same and light-blue piping around the collar and cuffs. Light-blue silk girdle. Silver epaulettes and sash, of the confirmed pattern. Silver sword knot on a black strap. Forage cap the same as for lower ranks, but with a visor and cockade.

Ammunition pouch for 20 rounds in iron pockets laid out in one row; pockets lined with black morocco, trimmed at the bottom along the seam with thin black silk cord, and with a black morocco lid trimmed around the edge with silver lace without a light. Cartridge-carrier crossbelt of silver lace without a light, backed with black morocco 11/16 vershok [1-1/5 inches] wide, with silver buckles, slides, and endpieces. Carrier for stowing the pistol—of black morocco, with two side flaps and stitching along the sides; 1-7/8 vershoks [3-1/4 inches] long on the left side, 3-1/2 [6-1/8] on the right; 3 vershoks [5-1/4 inches] wide at the top, 1-1/2 [2-5/8] at the bottom.

Pistol lanyard—silver with one tassle and two slides, 2 arshins 10 vershoks [73-1/2 inches] long. Pistol case—of dark-blue cloth to the lower part of the firelock, from the lower part of the lock of black morocco; at the top, where the cloth ends, and below at the very end, it is trimmed around with silver lace without a light. A black silk cord for tying around the butt. The case is 7 vershoks [12-1/4] inches long, 3-3/4 [6-1/2] wide at the top, 1-3/4 [3] at the middle, and 2 [3-1/2] in circumference at the bottom; lace on the cases 3/8 vershok [2/3 inch] wide.

Sword belt—of the pattern established for light cavalry, modified so that the waistbelt is whole and to it are sewn the slings on an oval ring which is only half visible, and so that the sword belt is sewn on the waistbelt and slings with silver lace without a light.

Dark-blue cloth saddlecloth, reinforced with black calf-skin; trimmed around the edges with light-blue tape 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide; the same tape is on the corners of the saddlecloth, 5-1/2 vershoks [9-1/2 inches] in length in the front and 9 [15-3/4] at the rear. Cushion of dark-blue cloth backed with black calf-skin; trimmed around along the seam with light-blue tape 3/4 vershok [1-1/4 inches] wide. Valise of gray cloth with leather reinforcement, four white metal buttons, and the regimental number; valise 12 vershoks [21 inches] long, the ends 9 [15-3/4 inches] around.

Shashka with gilt handle, bands with rings, and endpiece. Wooden scabbard wrapped in black morocco.

The headdress, neckcloth, sharovary, and other pieces of uniform clothing, weaponry, and horse furniture follow the patterns prescribed for lower rank except for the musket and sling and the musket case, as well as the lance, none of which are prescribed for officers (Illus. 1284).

On scheduled feastdays, when they are prescribed to be in full parade or ceremonial dress, all field and company-grade officers of the Danube Cossack Host are to wear jackets. When wearing the chekmen the headress, girdle, swordbelt, and shashka are worn; while on campaign the headdress has a cover of black lacquered leather.

The adjutant to the Government Ataman is prescribed a uniform of cossack cut, of dark-green cloth with a silver aiguilette; red cloth collar with two silver buttonhole loops on the collar and cuffs; piping and girdle white; sharovary with red edging; saber of the pattern for cavalry troops.

Mounted personnel on internal service.

Dark-blue cloth forage cap with light-blue band and piping. Gray cloth greatcoat with a collar of the same with light-blue tabs. Gray cloth sharovary with light-blue piping. Ammunition pouch, sword belt, and shashka—of the patterns for serving cossacks. Standard cossack pistol. Saddle of the pattern for serving cossacks, without a cloth shabrack (Illus. 1285).

Dismounted personnel on internal service.

Forage cap, greatcoat, and sharovary—exactly like those for mounted personnel on internal service. Lance 2-1/4 arshins [5 feet 3 inches] long (Illus. 1286) (168).

14 April 1845 - Chekmens in the Danube Cossack Host are replaced by jackets, as introduced at this time in the Don, Astrakhan, Ural, and Orenburg hosts. Field and company-grade officers are ordered to wear pistols with cords only when in formation (169).

27 April 1845 - With the changes in uniform for the Danube Cossack Host promulgated on 14 April 1845, there are established:

Dark-blue chekmen as before, but reaching to 4 vershoks [7 inches] of the knee, with light-blue edging on the collar and cuffs; for non-commissioned officers their prescribed silver buttonhole loops. Headdress of black astrakhan, 4-1/4 vershoks [7-7/8 inches] high, without an indent on top, with a light-blue cloth bag under which is sewn an oilcloth base. Light-blue girdle. Pistol case of the previous pattern, but sewn into a holder fastened to the sword belt on the left side. All other items of uniforms and weapons not mentioned here, as well as horse furniture, remain unchanged (Illus. 1287 and 1288) (170).

 

 

XIV. Azov Cossack Host.
[Azovskoe kazach'e voisko.]

 

11 January 1833 - The Azov Cossack Host is prescribed uniforms after the style of the Black Sea Cossack Host with the following dinstinctions in colors:

Raspberry jacket, with a similarly colored collar and dark-blue sleeves, with raspberry piping along the edges of the cuffs; raspberry shoulder straps with dark-blue piping; false sleeves (on the back), raspberry with similarly colored cuffs; dark-blue chekmen with the same colored collar piped raspberry, raspberry sleeves; dark-blue shoulder straps with raspberry piping; dark-blue false sleeves, the cuffs with raspberry piping; dark-blue sharovary pants without stripes; headdress bag raspberry; upper and lower pompons, cords, and girdle—white; for officers the same uniform but with their normal distinctions (Illus. 1289 and 1290) (171).

17 December 1837 - An additional, fourth, thin twist of braid is added to officers’ epaulettes, as in the regular forces (172).

29 April 1838 - The changes in uniforms for the Don Host promulgated on this day are also applied to the Azov Host, except for colors, which in the Host remain as before (Illus. 1291) (173).

8 March 1841 - The Azov Cossack Host is prescribed uniforms of dark-blue cloth cut as in foot battalions of the Black Sea Cossack Host, described in detail above (Vol. 29, Historical Description of The Clothing and Arms of the Russian Army), but with light-blue piping, and with light-blue tape on the cartridge-holders instead of red (Illus. 1292, 1293, and 1294) (174).

2 January 1844 - There is to be a metallic cockade on the front of the capband of officers’ forage caps, as established at this same time for officers’ caps in the regular forces (175).

20 May 1844 - With the general allocation of forage cap colors throughout the Military Administration, in the Azov Cossack Host forage caps are to have a dark-blue crown, dark-blue band with one line of light-blue piping around the top edge, and light-blue piping around the top of the crown (176).

14 April 1845 - Officers are ordered to wear pistols with cords only when in formation (177).

27 April 1845 - For the Azov Cossack Host there are established:

Dark-blue chekmen reaching to 4 vershoks [7 inches] of the knees, with light-blue edging on the collar and cuffs (Illus. 1295), and for officers—their prescribed silver buttonhole loops. Pistol case of the previous pattern, but sewn to the holder which is fastened to the sword belt at the left side.

The rest of the uniform items and weapons not mentioned here remain unchanged (178).

31 July 1851 - Officers of the Azov Cossack Host are ordered to have everyday chekmens and sharovary, after the example of Black Sea Foot Cossack battalions: dark-blue chekmens with the same colored collar piped around in light-blue and without any embroidery; collar and front opening down to the waist closed with small hooks; the cut of the chekmen in the back and on the skirts is in the Circassion style, likewise the long sleeves; sharovary of dark-blue cloth without stripes or galloon (Illus. 1296) (179).

3 January 1852 - Jackets replace the coat, and a coat is established of the pattern for Black Sea Foot Cossack battalions.

Officers: chekmen of dark-blue cloth cut the same as the everyday one, but shorter so that the skirts go to only 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] of the knees; light-blue piping and silver buttonhole loops on the collar and cuffs.

Lower ranks: the same chekmen, without buttonhole loops.

Sharovary remain unchanged. The waistbelt for officers and lower ranks, and the sword belt for lower ranks, remain unchanged. For officers, though, the sword belt is to be worn over the shoulder. Officers are not to wear a sash with the coat (Illus. 1297) (180).

 

 

XV. Life-Guards Crimean-Tatar Squadron
[Leib-gvardii Krimsko-Tatarskii eskadron].

 

15 July 1827 - The following uniforms, accouterments, and weapons are confirmed for the newly established L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron:

Lower ranks.

Jacket (in summer) of scarlet cloth, with the same color collar, without cuffs, on the collar one buttonhole loop of white tape with red stripes; lace around the collar, along seams on the sleeves, and around the two pockets; with eight cartridge-holders on the breast; the holders are sewn onto red cloth (Illus. 1298). Dark-blue chekmen (in winter), with the same color collar and without cuffs, trimmed with white tape as the jacket; cartridge pockets on red cloth. Dark-blue sharovary pants with white tape along the outside seams. White girdle. White woolen epaulettes with a similar fringe. Tatar style headdress, round, red; a wide band of white tape, likewise white strips of galloon going to the center of the crown, where is set a knob or large button; black fur lining around the lower edge.

Arms and accouterments similar to those in the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment. Lances with red shafts. Saber and cartridge pouch on a white strap. Pistol on a bandoleer, also white.

Cossack saddle. Red saddlecloth with a dark-blue pillow. Both saddlecloth and pillow trimmed with white tape.

Officers.

Officers’ uniforms are similar to those of the lower ranks, but the trim is silver galloon instead of tape, with a black silk line running through, worn on the jacket, chekmen (Illus. 1299), sharovary, and headdress. Embroidered silver buttonhole loops on the collar. Silver epaulettes. Cartridge pouch on a silver belt. Sabers and sashes—as for cossack officers. Saddlecloth—the same colors as for lower ranks but trimmed with silver galloon, cord, and fringe (Illus. 1300) (181).

2 September 1827 - There are the following changes in uniforms for the L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron:

Lower ranks.

Uniforms for lower ranks are as before, but all white tape and galloon on the headdress, jacket, chekmen, and sharovary is to be yellow Guards tape with a red stripe [reika] (Illus. 1301). Orange woolen epaulettes, with a fringe, as in the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment. Sword belts and sword knots of red Russian leather. Round plates with a St. Andrew’s star on the cartridge pouches. Red saddlecloth, trimmed with white tape, as in the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment (Illus. 1301).

Officers.

For officers the cartridge pouch and saber are in all respects the same as in the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment. One embroidered silver buttonhole loop on each side of the collar on both jacket and chekmen. All galloon is silver, but wider than before and of the new pattern (Illus. 1302) (182).

23 September 1830 - Officers and lower ranks are ordered to wear scaled epaulettes, of the pattern for epaulettes in the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment (Illus. 1303) (183).

31 August 1832 - A new pattern headdress is confirmed, the same as before but without the knob (on top of the crown) for lower ranks (184).

4 July 1837 - Field and company-grade officers in the L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron are allowed to wear in those situations where in regular forces frock coats may be worn—and apart from the coat with buttonhole loops—a chekmen without embroidery, dark blue, without any piping, as established for the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment on 28 October 1836 (185).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given new pattern sashes with narrow silver lace of three rows of light-orange and black silk, as in regular forces (186).

17 December 1837 - An additional, fourth, thin twist of braid is added to officers’ epaulettes, as in the regular forces (187).

29 April 1838 - With the changes in uniforms and weapons for all cossack hosts as promulgated on this day, for the L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron there are established:

Lower ranks.

Headdresses of the pattern confirmed on 31 August 1832 for this squadron. Iron epaulettes, without a fringe, with a backing of scarlet cloth.

Ammunition pouchs (instead of cartridge pouches) for 40 rounds, of black Russian leather, with a lid of the same and a deerskin crossbelt without any fittings. Pistols of the pattern adopted in the light cavalry. Pistol carriers or holder (instead of holsters) of shiny black leather. pistol lanyards of orange silk. The upper part of the pistol cases to the firelock is of scarlet cloth, while the lower part is of polished black leather. Sword belt of red Russian leather.

Shashaks (instead of sabers) with brass handle, bands, rings, and endpieces, in wooden scabbards wrapped with black leather (Illus. 1304).

Officers.

The same headdresses as for lower ranks but trimmed with silver lace instead of orange tape.

Ammunition pouch (instead of cartridge pouch) for 20 rounds, of scarlet morocco leather, with a lid of scarlet cloth and a crossbelt of silver lace without a light, backed with scarlet morocco.

Pistols of the pattern adopted by light-cavalry officers. Pistol carriers of scarlet morocco. Silver pistol lanyards. The upper part of pistol cases of scarlet cloth, the lower of scarlet morocco. Sword belt of silver lace without a light, lined with scarlet morocco (Illus. 1305). Shashkas instead of sabers, with gilded handle, bands, rings, and endpiece, in a wooden scabbard wrapped with black morocco.

Officers as well as lower ranks are ordered to carry pistols in a holder fastened to the back of the sword belt on the left side, but they are to have these, as well as the carrier, cord, and case, only when in full uniform.

For lower ranks the horse’s load is ordered to be arranged thus: behind the saddle—valise and saddle blanket; the blanket to be stowed under the valise and together with it strapped to the saddle by three black straps with brass two-sided buckles of the current pattern; greatcoat in front of the saddle, strapped to it with three of the same kind of straps with buckles; the rolling of the greatcoat and the stowage of other items, as well as all pieces of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry in the squadron not mentioned here, including the cover for the headdress, remain unchanged (188).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established for the front of the band on officers’ forage caps, as for officers’ caps in regular forces (189).

20 May 1844 - With the general allocation of colors for forage caps in the Military Administration, forage caps in the L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron are established to be dark blue with a red band and red piping around the top (190).

14 April 1845 - Summer coats or jackets in the squadron are replaced by parade chekmens of the same color. These are ordered to be worn only on ceremonial days and during HIGHEST reviews. Officers are ordered to wear pistols with cords only when in formation (191).

27 April 1845 - Consequent to the changes in uniform for the L.-Gds. Crimean-Tatar Squadron promulgated on 14 April 1845, there are established:

Lower ranks.

Parade coat of scarlet cloth, of the exact same cut and pattern as used before this time; winter caftan of dark-blue cloth, with the only change being that it must be at least 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] above the knees; the coat is trimmed with orange woolen tape with a light the same color as the cloth (Illus. 1306 and 1307). Sharovary for everyday are without tape trim. Ammunition pouch for 20 rounds in 2 rows, of black lacquered leather on a white deerskin belt.

Pistol—on an orange woolen cord, with a case of scarlet cloth; the case trimmed with orange woolen tape and sewn into a holder of shiny black leather worn on the sword belt on the left side, and not behind the back.

Officers.

The same parade coat as for lower ranks, but trimmed with silver galloon instead of orange woolen tape (Illus. 1308). Everyday coat of dark-blue cloth, with two buttonhole loops on the collar; on the cuffs one row of galloon; on each side of the breast 4 small pockets of scarlet cloth for cartridges; the pockets trimmed around with galloon exactly as on the previous winter caftans, but the back sleeves, front opening, and skirts are not trimmed with galloon; length to within 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] of the knees (Illus. 1309). Sharovary for the everyday coat and undress chekmen are without galloon.

Pistol on a silver cord, with a case of scarlet cloth, trimmed with silver galloon and sewn into a holder of scarlet morocco worn on the sword belt on the left side, and not at the back.

Undress chekmen [vitse-chekmen'] and ammunition pouch for officers; sharovary for the parade coat and headdresses for both officers and lower ranks, and all items of uniforms and weaponry not mentioned here, as well as horse furniture—all remain unchanged (192).

18 January 1848 - Patterns are confirmed for officers’ cartridge pouches in place of ammunition pouchs (see H.I.M. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s Ataman Regiment) (193).

15 January 1851 - It is set forth that: the musket sling be made of two rawhide straps with one side blackened, joined together by a brass buckle and fastened to the musket by the ends being passed through the stock; the musket case be of black Russian leather lined with gray cloth and have a rawhide strap opposite the hammer; the brass kettle be carried on the right side of the valise instead of the left, in order to avoid damaging the musket and shashka; officers are not to have holsters, and pistols are to be in a carrier of the present pattern; lower ranks, when going out on guard duty, are to have the musket worn over the shoulder (194).

 

 

XVI. Balaklava Greek Infantry Battalion
[Balaklavskii Grecheskii pekhotnyi batal'on].

 

14 April 1830 - In place of the uniforms and accouterments used in this battalion since 1797, it is ordered to have new items of the following description:

Privates.

Naval pattern shako with brass army plate, with brass buttons over the chinstrap. Cossack style jacket, dark green with red collar, cuffs, and shoulder straps. Cossack style sharovary pants, dark green with red piping. Waistbelt of lancer pattern, dark green with red. Black cloth neckcloth. Gray greatcoat with red collar and shoulder straps, and brass buttons. Dark-green forage cap with a red band (no cut-out number or letter) and red piping around the top. Black leather sword belt, pistol holster of the same, with brass fittings. Black leather cartridge pouch, on a crossbelt of the same.

The saber, pistol, and musket (of an Albanian musket pattern) remain unchanged (Illus. 1310)

Non-commissioned officers.

All as for privates but with the addition of gold galloon on the jacket’s collar and cuffs (Illus. 1311).

Officers.

Uniform of the cut and colors as for privates, but with chinscales on the shako, gold infantry epaulettes on a red base, dark-green frock coat with a red collar and gold buttons; silk waistbelt, black sword belt with brass fittings; sword knot, sash, and gorget the same as for officers throughout the infantry (Illus. 1312) (195).

15 July 1837 - Officers are given new pattern sashes with narrow silver lace of three rows of light-orange and black silk, as in regular forces (196).

17 December 1837 - An additional, fourth, thin twist of braid is added to officers’ epaulettes, as in the regular forces (197).

2 January 1844 - A metal cockade is established for the front of the band on officers’ forage caps, as for officers’ caps in regular forces (198).

 

 

LXXXI. Uniforms and Arms of Temporary Forces
[Obmundirovanie i vooruzhenie vremennykh voisk].

 

26 November 1854 - Rules for organizing the Imperial Family Rifle Regiment are confirmed, including the following description of clothing and weapons (Illus. 1313 and 1314).

Officers.

Dark-green cloth Russian style headdress, square, with quilted lining, width in cross-section along the upper edge from one corner to the other 4-3/4 vershoks [8-1/3 inches], height from the corner to the brim 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches]; brim of black astrakhan 1-1/4 vershoks [2-3/16 inches] high. In front of the headdress, on the brim opposite the corner, is sewn a brass cross of the confirmed pattern.

Dark-green cloth half-caftan in the Russian style, without a collar, open at the neck in front just a little; pleats in back; fastened from right to left with 6 round gilt buttons, 6 small loops made from thin gold cord sewn to the right side. On both sides of the half-caftan are sewn cloth flaps for pockets. Piped with red cloth everywhere along the edges except the skirt hem. Alongside the piping on the front opening down to the waist are sewn two rows of gold army galloon, the first row next to the opening being narrow, 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] wide, and the second wider, 1/2 veshok [7/8 inch]; the same galloon is used to trim the lower edge of the sleeves, which do not have cuffs. Dark-green stamin is used for lining. The half-caftan reaches to 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] of the knees. Dark-green cloth sharovary pants, inside boots. Epaulettes of gold twisted braid with a woven gold field, with army rank distinctions. Sash (with the parade dress instead of a girdle) and sword knot on the shashka—as for army infantry.

Standard officer’s greatcoat, with a gray collar with dark-green tabs as for cossacks; officers have smooth yellow buttons, while the auditor and medical officials have white. In wartime officers and classed officials wear campaign greatcoats of the pattern confirmed for the rifle regiment’s lower ranks. Girdle of red wool for girding the half-caftan and the greatcoat. Waistbelt according to pattern. White suede gloves.

Boots with long shafts with a red leather edgd. For field-grade officers, adjutants, the paymaster, quartermaster, doctor, and auditor—with spurs. Dark-green forage cap of the pattern for army jäger regiments, with a cockade, worn on all those occasions when officers in regular forces are allowed to wear the cap. Shashka—dragoon pattern. Sword belt of dragoon pattern, over the shoulder, lined with gold galloon on black leather. Knapsack with straps according to the pattern for army jäger regiments.

The auditor and medical officials are prescribed the same uniform but without epaulettes, with silver appointments. Additionally, medical officials were given shoulder straps by an order of the Minister of War dated 11 October 1854.

Lower ranks.

Headdress as for officers, with a canvas lining, quilted, weighing from 60 to 65 zolotniks [9 to 10 ounces]. Half-caftan of dark-green cloth, in the Russian national style, without a collar; open in front at the neck just a little; pleated in back; closed from right to left with 6 round brass buttons and 6 small loops made from thin black woolen cord, sewn to the right side. Piped with red cloth along all the edges except the skirt hem; sleeves without cuffs. Red cloth shoulder straps on both shoulders, with smooth brass buttons, one on each strap; the length of the strap is determined by the shoulder, its width is 1-1/2 vershoks [2-5/8 inches]; lined in the same color as the uniform. On both sides of the half-caftan are sewn cloth flaps 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] long, 1 vershok [1-3/4 inches] wide at the bottom, and 1/2 vershok [7/8 inch] at the top. Lining in the sleeves and the back is linen, and on the skirts of black kersey. On the inside along the waist is sewn plain tape to reinforce the pleats on the half-caftan. It is no closer than 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] of the knees as measured when kneeling. For non-commissioned officers the half-caftan has gold army galloon sewn around the upper edge around the neck (set back a small distance from the piping—1/4 vershok [1/2 inch]), and around the sleeves along the edges, again a small distance from the piping. On hornists’ half-caftans are sewn red cloth wings trimmed with white tape after the manner of army troops.

Dark-green cloth sharovary pants, with pleats in front and behind, two on each side, with a cloth waistbelt 2 vershoks [3-1/2 inches] wide in front and 1-1/2 [2-5/8] behind. On the belt are sewn two metal buttons for securing the linen lining. The sharovary reach to the ankle, and are 5-1/2 vershoks [9-1/2 inches] wide at the bottom; the sharovary are tucked into the boots.

Gray cloth greatcoat, in the style of a peasant’s coat, or armyak, with a turned-down collar around the neck of the same cloth, 1-1/2 vershoks [2-5/8 inches] wide at the back. Closed from right to left on the side with 2 small iron hooks. Inside the greatcoat is sewn plain tape with 12 loops (of the same tape) for cinching the greatcoat in accordance with the wearer’s waist size. No cuffs on the sleeves. Linen is used to line the sleeves, back, and under the skirts (8 vershoks [14 inches] long. Shoulder straps of red cloth with smooth brass buttons; the length of the strap is determined by the shoulder; 1-1/2 vershoks [2-5/8 inches] wide, backed with the same color as the greatcoat.

Red girdle of plain wool, 3 arshins 6 vershoks [7 feet 7-1/2 inches] long, 5-1/2 vershoks [9-1/2 inches] wide; when worn, the edges on both sides are folded up for 4 vershoks [7 inches] so that the girdle comes out to be 1-1/2 vershoks [2-1/2 inches] wide. The girdle is bound around the half-caftan or greatcoat directly at the waist and tied in front with a knot, with the ends tucked back up under it. Waistbelt of polished black leather with an iron buckle, 1 arshin 12 vershoks [49 inches] long, 3/4 vershoks [1-1/4 inches] wide, worn under the girdle. Shirt of normal shirt linen with a side collar. Bib [nagrudnik] of plain coarse cloth [pestryad'].

Gloves for supply train personnel according to pattern.

Mittens of dark-green cloth, army pattern; to the upper edge is sewn a cloth loop and if the mittens are not being worn on the hands, then they are passed through the loop under the girdle on the left side.

Boots of black Russian leather, welted, with an elongated forepart, the front reaching to the knee, with a small notch behind. On the shafts small folds; inside their upper part lined with red sheep leather so that a red edge appears at the top of the shaft. The shafts must be ample enough for the sharovary to be tucked inside them. Heels 1/4 vershok [1/2 inch] high. Train personnel are prescribed spurs.

Rifle [shtutser]. A normal ax; the handle painted black; worn in a case on the waistbelt along with a bayonet scabbard, on the left side. Rifle sling of polished black leather, of the pattern for rifle battalions, with brass buckles and a button. Cover on the firing pin of pattern adopted in the forces. Ammunition pouch of black calf-skin leather with a lid of the same, lined with canvas, with places for 60 rounds, with two iron buckles. Cartridge-carrier belt of shiny black leather, 3 arshins [7 feet] long and 3/4 vershoks [1-1/4 inches] wide. Small pouch for firing capsules, carried under the cartridge-carrier lid on the left side.

Case for the ax, of polished black leather sized for the ax blade, with a strap, closed by three leather straps sewn onto the top part that fasten to matching buttons. The frog for carrying the ax is of polished black leather with a pocket into which fits the bayonet scabbard.

Knapsack of the pattern for troops in the Separate Caucasus Corps, of black Russian leather, with a canvas lining, 12-7/8 vershoks [22-1/2 inches] long and 10-1/2 [18-3/8 inches] wide; rawhide strap for closing the top of the knapsack, 1/8 vershok [1/4 inch] wide and 1-3/6 arshins [42 inches] long. Knapsack straps of the pattern for army jägers.

Greatcoat case—standard, of raven’ duck oilcloth; 15 vershoks [26-1/4 inches] long and 9 [15-3/4] wide, with three ties of black tape, each 5 vershoks [8-3/4 inches] long. Standard greatcoat straps of shiny black leather, with an iron buckle.

Kettle—according to pattern, copper, the inside tinned, with an iron handle; secured to the knapsack by a strap passed through a brass D-ring and the iron handle. The kettle with lid is 4-1/8 vershoks [7-1/4 inches] high and 2-1/4 [4] wide; the side at the lid is 7/8 vershok [1-1/2 inches]; the weight of the kettle is from 2 funts 50 zolotniks to 2 funts 60 zolotniks [2 pounds 4 ounces to 2 pounds 5-1/2 ounces].

Signal bugle as for other troops.

All noncombatant lower ranks have a uniform like that for combatant personnel, except orderlies, who do not have shoulder straps, piping, or a cross on the headdress (199).

29 January 1855 - Regulations are confirmed for the Government Mobile Mass Levy, including a description of the uniform and weapons for its members [ratniki].

Forage cap of gray peasant cloth with a visor; on it a cross cut from yellow brass. Armyak coat with shoulder straps 1-1/2 vershoks [2-5/8 inches] wide, likewise of gray peasant cloth, lined with linen, reaching to 1 vershok [1-3/4 inches] of the knees, cut rather loose so that a short sheepskin coat may be worn under it. Non-commissioned officers [uryadniki] have gold galloon the collar. Sharovary pants of gray peasant cloth, worn inside the boots. Long Russian boots. Shirt of normal peasant linen. Leather girdle, made from a rawhide strap, 1-1/2 vershoks [2-5/8 inches] wide, with an iron buckle.

Leather peasants’ mittens with inserts, or of gray peasant cloth with a linen lining. Which kind of mitten each druzhina [battalion] is to have, leather or cloth, is left to the decision of the local noble assembly, taking into account the convenience of obtaining one or the other.

Short sheepskin coat.

Ax—for all non-commissioned officers on the official establishment, drummers, hornists, and 860 combatant ratniki in each druzhina. In the druzhinas of Vitebsk and Mobilev provinces for 306 ratniki.

Infantry musket with bayonet. If ratniki have their own rifles or muskets, then they are allowed to keep them in the mass levy.

Spades—for 60 combatants in each druzhina, but in Vitebsk and Mogilev provinces—for 64. Leather knapsack with straps, small hooks, and rings—of the pattern used in the Caucasus. Ammunition pouch [patrontash]—the cavalry pattern. Water flasks—for personnel in the 1st and 3rd ranks. Kettles for personnel in the 2nd rank.

Ratniki do not shave their beards. Hair will remain cut as it was when they were in the peasantry. Lower rank cadre personnel are from internal guard battalions and invalid commands, and are assigned to a druzhina for their formation and training. They wear the same uniform as the ratniki and wear moustaches, but are not permitted beards. Officers of the druzhiny have uniforms of the same pattern as the men, of gray factory cloth; red girdle; gold epaulettes with cloth of the color prescribed for the division to which the druzhina is assigned (Illus. 1315 and 1316). Adjutants to commanders of provincial mass levies are prescribed silver epaulettes and aiguilette. Officers do not have beards but wear moustaches; they may cut they hair as the men.

Officers’ arms consist of the standard infantry half-saber with sword knot, on a lacquered black sword belt, as for naval officers.

Actual state councilors and privy councilors, upon joining the mass levy, and if they command a druzhina, wear the uniform prescribed for the druzhina’s officers, with gold general-officers’ epaulettes with cloth and small rank stars, but to dinstinguish them from army generals their shoulder straps are silver.

Brigade and division commanders wear the standard army uniform, also with silver shoulder straps (200).

 

 

LXXXII. Flags and Standards
[Znamena i shtandarty].

 

(In this section regiments and other units are shown under those titles and numbers they had when they received their flags and standards.)

ARMY INFANTRY.

All flags newly granted to grenadier and infantry regiments after 19 November 1825 kept the same colors, dimensions, and patterns that they had during the last years of the preceding reign, except for the change in the corners from the monogram of Emperor Alexander I to that of Emperor Nicholas Pavlovich. Thus, for all these regiments the cross remained green. Corners for regiments of the 1st Grenadier Division were red with white stripes; in the 2nd Division—red with black; in the 3rd—red with yellow; in infantry regiments of the Separate Lithuanian Corps—raspberry with white; and in all other infantry regiments—white. Carabinier and jäger regiments (except in the Guards) did not have flags under Emperor Alexander I. Flag poles up to 1833 were as in the preceding reign: in a division’s first regiment—straw colored; in the second—black; in the third—white; and in the fourth—coffee colored. If flags were granted to carabinier and jäger regiments (fifth and sixth in divisions), the poles were prescribed one general color—black.

The Lutsk and Samogitia Grenadier Regiments and the Nesvizh Carabinier Regiment, all three being in the reserve corps of forces under the command of the Tsesarevich and Grand Duke Constantine Pavlovich, and all regiments of the Separate Lithuanian Corps, had on their flags, on eagle’s breast shield, the Lithuanian coat-of-arms instead of the Moscow coat-of-arms, i.e. instead of an image of St. George—an image of a galloping horseman with a drawn saber. This was mentioned in a HIGHEST Order of 9 May 1831 for the reserve and Lithuanian corps that removed all their existing exceptions from the general regulations for uniforms and the construction of flags and standards in the rest of the Russian army.

From 1827 flags were granted to carabinier and jäger regiments. For carabiniers this was the same flag as for grenadier regiments with the addition of yellow stripes between the cross and corners (Illus. 1317). For the first jäger regiments in brigades the flag was the same as for infantry with the addition of sky-blue stripes between the cross and corners (Illus. 1318a, 1318b); for the second jäger regiments—as infantry with the addition of red stripes between the cross and corners (Illus. 1318c, 1318d). Such flags were granted to the following units up to the reorganization of army infantry in 1833-1834, i.e. when all grenadier, carabinier, infantry, and jäger regiments consisted of two active battalions and one reserve battalion:

1. In the 1st Grenadier Division (green cross, corners red with white):
Emperor of Austria’s Grenadier Regiment, Reserve Battalion - 6 December 1827.
King of Prussia’s Grenadier Regiment, Reserve Battalion - 22 August 1826.
Crown Prince of Prussia’s Grenadier Regiment, Reserve Battalion - 6 December 1826.
Graf Arakcheev’s Grenadier Regiment, Reserve Battalion - 6 August 1826.
2. In the 2nd Grenadier Division (green cross, corners red with black):
Kiev Grenadier Regiment, Reserve Battalion - 3 January 1831.
Prince Eugene of Württemberg’s Grenadier Regiment (Taurica), 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For taking a flag in battle against the French in Holland at Bergen in 1799”) - 13 June 1827, and the Reserve Battalion (plain, without inscription) - 22 August 1831.
Yekaterinoslav Grenadier Regiment, Reserve Battalion - 22 August 1831.
Prince Paul of Mecklenburg’s Grenadier Regiment (Moscow), Reserve Battalion - 3 January 1832.
3. In the 3rd Grenadier Division (green cross, corners red with yellow):
Generalissimus Prince Suvorov’s Grenadier Regiment (St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Bazardzhik by storm 22 May 1810 and of Ostrolenko 14 May 1831”) - 25 June 1831.
Astrakhan Grenadier Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and Reserve Battalions (St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Ostrolenko by storm 14 May 1831”) - 25 June 1831.
4. In the 1st Grenadier Division (green cross, corners red with white, yellow stripes between the cross and corners) (Illus. 1317a):
1st Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - 23 April 1827, Reserve Battalion - 8 December 1829, and all three battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 6 December 1831.
Field Marshal Prince Barclay de Tolly’s Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - 23 April 1827, and Reserve Battalion - 8 December 1829.
5. In the 2nd Grenadier Division (green cross, corners red with black, yellow stripes between the cross and corners) (Illus. 1317b):
3rd Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - 25 February 1827.
4th Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - 25 February 1827.
6. In the 3rd Grenadier Division (green cross, corners red with yellow, yellow stripes between the cross and corners) (Illus. 1317c):
5th Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - 23 May 1828, and Reserve Battalion - 28 January 1830.
6th Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - 23 May 1828, and Reserve Battalion - 28 January 1830.
7. In the reserve corps of forces under the command of H.I.H. the Tsesarevich and Grand Duke Constantine Pavlovich (green cross, corners raspberry, yellow stripes between the cross and corners):
Nesvizh Carabinier Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - 20 August 1827.
8. Marine and Infantry regiments, except those in the Separate Lithuanian Corps (green cross, white corners:
3rd Marine Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 6 December 1831.
4th Marine Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 6 December 1831.
Archangel Infantry Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For taking a French flag in the Alps”) - 7 January 1828.
Vologda Infantry Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 6 December 1831.
Neva Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at Kulevche 30 May 1829”) - 6 April 1830.
Sofiya Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at Kulevche 30 May 1829”) - 6 April 1830.
Kopore Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at Kulevche 30 May 1829”) - 6 April 1830.
Aleksopol Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 6 December 1831.
Kremenchug Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 6 December 1831.
Polotsk Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Pravody against a Turkish army in 1829”) - 6 April 1830.
Kozlov Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Bayazet fortress 20 and 21 June 1829”) - 22 August 1830.
Nasheburg Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Bayazet fortress 20 and 21 June 1829”) - 22 August 1830.
9. First Jäger regiments in brigades, except those in the Separate Lithuanian Corps (green cross, white corners, sky-blue stripes between cross and corners) (Illus. 1318a):
1st Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 25 November 1827.
3rd Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 2 December 1827.
5th Jäger Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction in the pacification of Poland in 1831”) - 6 December 1831.
7th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 6 December 1827.
9th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 28 February 1828.
11th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at Kulevche 30 May 1829”) - 6 April 1830.
13th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at the siege and taking of Anapa and Varna 1828”) - 29 September 1828.
17th Jäger Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions (plain flags with the inscription “For the crossing of the Danube 17 May 1828”) - 27 June 1828.
19th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Pravody against a Turkish army in 1829”) - 6 April 1830.
31st Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 22 November 1831.
37th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Pravody against a Turkish army in 1829”) - 6 April 1830.
10. First Jäger regiments in brigades in the Separate Lithuanian Corps (green cross, corners white with raspberry, sky-blue stripes between cross and corners) (Illus. 1318b):
47th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 24 September 1827.
49th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 24 September 1827.
11. Second Jäger regiments in brigades, except those in the Separate Lithuanian Corps (green cross, white corners, red stripes between cross and corners) (Illus. 1318c):
2nd Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 25 November 1827.
4th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 2 December 1827.
6th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 25 December 1827.
8th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 6 December 1827.
10th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 18 June 1827.
12th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at Kulevche 30 May 1829”) - 6 April 1830.
14th Jäger Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at the siege and taking of Anapa and Varna 1828”) - 29 September 1828.
20th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Pravody against a Turkish army in 1829”) - 6 April 1830.
32nd Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 22 November 1831.
42nd Jäger Regiment, 1st and 3rd Battalions (plain flags with the inscription “For the defense of the fortress of Shusha against a Persian army in 1826”) - 27 June 1828.
12. Second Jäger regiments in brigades in the Separate Lithuanian Corps (green cross, corners white with raspberry, red stripes between cross and corners) (Illus. 1318d):
48th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 24 September 1827.
50th Jäger Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 24 September 1827 .

After the reorganization of army infantry in 1833 and 1834 with the establishment of indefinite leave, the grenadier and carabinier regiments of the Grenadier Corps consisted of three active battalions (1st, 2nd, and 3rd), one reserve (4th), and one replacement (5th), and the grenadier (Georgia) and carabinier (Erivan) regiments of the Caucasus Corps—of four active battalions (1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th) and one reserve (5th); all infantry and jäger regiments of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th Infantry Corps—of four active battalions (1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th), one reserve (5th), and one replacement (6th); all infantry and jäger regiments of the Caucasus Corps—of four active battalions (1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th), one reserve (5th) with the regiment, and one reserve (6th) with this corps’ special Reserve Division; the regiments of the 19th Infantry Division (in Finland), all disbanded in 1835—of three active battalions (1st, 2nd, and 3rd), and one reserve (4th) battalion.


New flags were presented to the following regiments:


1. Grenadiers and Carabiniers.

The Crown Prince of Prussia’s Grenadier Regiment, 3rd Battalion (plain) - 26 February 1833; 2nd Battalion - Alexander ribbons, 26 June 1836.

Graf Arakcheev’s Grenadier Regiment (from 1835 Prince Frederick of the Netherlands’ Grenadier Regiment), 3rd Battalion (plain) - 26 February 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons and the inscriptions around the edges “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812” and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 July 1850.

Samogitia Grenadier Regiment (from 1833 Archduke Franz Karl’s), 3rd and 4th Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction in 1807 against the French and for Warsaw 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 26 February 1833.

Field Marshal Prince Barclay de Tolly’s Carabinier Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 26 February 1833.

Kiev Grenadier Regiment (from 1834 His Royal Highness the Crown Prince of Orange’s Grenadier Regiment; from 1849 His Majesty the King of the Netherlands’, 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons and the inscriptions around the edges “For the feat at Schöngraben 4 November 1805, in the battle of a 5-thousand man corps against an enemy of 30 thousand” and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 July 1850.

His Royal Highness Prince Eugene of Württemberg’s Grenadier Regiment, 3rd Battalion - 26 February 1833.

Yekaterinoslav Grenadier Regiment (from 1840 H.I.H. the Hereditary Tsesarevich’s Grenadier Regiment), 3rd Battalion - 26 February 1833.

Prince Paul of Mecklenburg’s Carabinier Regiment (from 1843 Grand Duke Frederick of Mecklenburg’s Carabinier Regiment), 3rd and 4th Battalions - 20 February 1833, 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Siberia Grenadier Regiment (from 1844 H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s Grenadier Regiment; from 1849 H.I.M. Grand Duke Nicholas Nikolaevich (the Elder’s) Grenadier Regiment), 3rd Battalion (plain) and 4th Battalion (St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Ostrolenko by storm 14 May 1831”) - 26 February 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions, with Alexander ribbons and the inscription “1700-1850”- 25 July 1850.

Field Marshal Graf Rumyantsev of the Trans-Danube’s Grenadier Regiment, 3rd Battalion (plain) and 4th Battalion (St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Ostrolenko by storm 14 May 1831”) - 26 February 1833; 3rd Battalion, with an Alexander ribbon - 25 July 1838.

Generalissimus Prince Suvorov’s Grenadier Regiment, 3rd Battalion - 26 February 1833.

Astrakhan Carabinier Regiment (from 1845 H.I.H. Grand Duke Alexander Aleksandrovich’s Carabinier Regiment), 3rd and 4th Battalions - 26 February 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons and the inscription around the edges “For distinction at the taking of Ostrolenko by storm 14 May 1831” and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 July 1850.

Georgia Grenadier Regiment (from 1848 H.I.H. Grand Duke Constantine Nikolaevich’s Grenadier Regiment) 3rd and 4th Battalions - 8 April 1834; 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons and the inscriptions around the edges “For distinctive courage at the taking by storm of the Turkish fortress of Akhalkalaki 7-8 December 1811” and under the eagle “1700-1850”), and 3rd Battalion (with an Alexander ribbon and the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 July 1850.

Erivan Carabinier Regiment (from 1850 H.I.H. the Hereditary Tsesarevich’s Erivan Carabinier Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 8 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 4th Battalions (with Alexander ribbons and the inscription “1642-1842”) - 25 June 1842.

As before, regiments in the 1st Division were prescribed flags with a green cross and corners half red and half white; in the 2nd Division a green cross, corners red with black; in the 3rd Division and Caucasus Grenadier Brigade—green cross, corners red with yellow; in Carabinier regiments of all three divisions and the Caucasus Grenadier Brigade—with the addition of yellow stripes between the cross and corners.

Since 26 February 1833 flag poles in Grenadier regiments were prescribed to be yellow for the division’s first regiments, white for the second regiments, coffee-colored for the third regiments, and black in Carabinier regiments, as before.


2. Infantry regiments.

(Green cross, white corners.)

Neva Marine Regiment (from 1846 H.M. the King of Naples Ferdinand II’s Infantry Regiment), 4th Battalion (St.-George flag with the inscription “For the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 16 June 1833; 3rd Active Battalion and 6th Reserve Battalion (plain flags) - 16 June 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons and metal bands - 25 June 1838.

Sofiya Marine Regiment, 3rd Battalion and 6th Reserve Battalion - 16 June 1833; 4th Active Battalion (with the inscription “For the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”); 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons and metal bands - 25 June 1838.

Prince of Prussia’s Infantry Regiment, 3rd Active Battalion and 6th Reserve Battalion - 16 June 1833; 4th Battalion (St.-George flag with the inscription “For the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 16 June 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions - Alexander ribbons and metal bands - 25 June 1838.

Prince Carl of Prussia’s Infantry Regiment, 3rd Active and 6th Reserve battalions - 16 June 1833; 4th Active Battalion (St.-George flag with the inscription “For the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”) - 16 June 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions - Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

General-Adjutant Prince Menshikov’s Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 16 June 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

New-Ingermanland Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 16 June 1838; 4th Battalion, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

General-Field Marshal Prince Volkonskii’s Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions (with Alexander ribbons, with the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Olonets Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 3rd and 4th Battalions (with Alexander ribbons, with the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

H.I.H. Grand Duke Vladimir Aleksandrovich’s Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “In recognition of outstanding feats performed in the 1814 battles on 17 January at Brienne-le-Chateau and on the 20th at the town of La-Rothiere”) - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons, with the inscriptions around the edges “For taking a French flag in the Alps” and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Vologda Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 3rd and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Murom Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Pravody against a Turkish army in 1829”) - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1850.

Nizhnii-Novgorod Infantry Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions (with Alexander ribbons and the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Field Marshal the Duke of Wellington’s Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons and the inscription around the edges “For taking a French flag in the Alps” and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Mogilev Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833.

Field Marshal Graf Diebitsch of the Trans-Balkans’ Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons and the inscriptions around the edges “For distinction in the defeat and explusion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812” and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Poltava Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 3rd and 4th Battalions (with Alexander ribbons and inscriptions “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Yelets Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 3rd and 4th Battalions (with Alexander ribbons and inscriptions “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Sevsk Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833.

Yekaterinburg Infantry Regiment, 3rd Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction in 1814 against the French”), and 6th Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction in 1828 and 1829 in the war against the Turks”) - 14 April 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 November 1834.

Tobolsk Infantry Regiment, 3rd Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction against the French in 1812, 1813 and 1814”) - 14 April 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Selenginsk Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 22 June 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834; 3rd and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 26 June 1838.

Yakutsk Infantry Regiment, 3rd Battalion - 22 June 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834; 3rd and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Azov Infantry Regiment, 3rd and 6th Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Pravody against a Turkish army in 1829”) - 22 June 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 1st and 2nd Battalions (with the inscription “1700-1850”), 3rd and 4th Battalions (with the inscription around the edges “For the defense of Pravody against a Turkish army in 1829”, and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Dnieper Infantry Regiment, 3rd Battalion (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Pravody against a Turkish army in 1829”) - 22 June 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834; 3rd and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion (St.-George flags with the inscription around the edges “For the defense of Pravody against a Turkish army in 1829”, and under the eagle “1700-1850”), and 4th Battalion (with the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Brest Infantry Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions - 11 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 2nd Battalion 13 August 1846; 1st, 2nd, and 4th Battalions (with the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850; 1st Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction in battle against the Turks beyond the Cholok River 4 June 1854”); 2nd and 3rd Battalions (with the inscription “For the defeat of the Turks 14 November 1853 at Akhaltsykh”) - 1854.

Belostok Infantry Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions - 11 April 1834; 3rd (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbon and the inscription “For distinction in the war against the Turks in 1828 and 1829”) - 28 February 1845; 2nd Battalion - 13 August 1846; 3rd Battalion (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbon and the inscription around the edges “For distinction in the war against the Turks 1828-1829”, and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850; 1st Battalion (with the inscription “For the defeat of the Turks 14 November 1853 at Akhaltsykh”) - 1854.

Volhynia Infantry Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions - 11 April 1834; 3rd and 4th Battalions , Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction in the battle at Bar-sur-Aube”) - 28 February 1845; 4th Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction in the battle at Bar-sur-Aube, 15 February 1814”) - 11 April 1846; 2nd Battalion - 13 August 1846; 3rd Battalion (with the inscription around the edges “For distinction in the battle at Bar-sur-Aube, 15 February 1814”, and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Minsk Infantry Regiment, 3rd Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction in the war against the French in 1812, 1813 and 1814”), and 4th Battalion (plain) - 11 April 1833; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 4th Battalion - 11 April 1846; 2nd Battalion - 13 August 1846.

Modlin Infantry Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions - 11 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 2nd Battalion - 13 August 1846; 4th Battalion (with the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Praga Infantry Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions - 11 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 1st and 3rd Battalions (with the inscription “For the campaign to Andi in June 1845”) - 20 March 1846; 2nd Battalion (with the inscription “For the campaign to Andi in June 1845”) - 13 August 1846; 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For the campaign to Andi in June 1845 and the taking by storm of the Telesh ravine in Transylvania in 1849”), and 3rd and 4th Battalions (with the inscription “For the taking by storm of the Telesh ravine in Transylvania in 1849”) - 25 December 1849.

Vladimir Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 12 May 1833; 5th Battalion - 12 December 1836; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (with the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Suzdal Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions (with the inscription “For distinction in the war against the Turks in 1828 and 1829”) - 12 May 1833; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion (with the inscription “1700-1850”), and 4th Battalion (with the inscription around the edges “For distinction in the battle at Bar-sur-Aube, 15 February 1814”, and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Moscow Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions (with the inscription “For distinction in the battle at Bar-sur-Aube”), and 5th Battalion - 12 May 1833; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions (with the inscription “1700-1850”), and 4th Battalion (with the inscription around the edges “For distinction in the battle at Bar-sur-Aube, 15 February 1814”, and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Butyrsk Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 12 May 1833; 3rd Battalion - 25 February 1845.

Ryazan Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 12 May 1833; 5th Battalion - 12 December 1836; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845.

Ryazhsk Infantry Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 12 May 1833; 5th Battalion - 12 December 1836; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845.

From 3 June 1834 flag poles in infantry regiments were prescribed to be yellow in a division’s first regiments and white in the second regiments.


3. The first Jäger regiments in brigades.

(Green cross, white corners, sky-blue stripes between the cross and corners.)

Narva Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 16 June 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Reval Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 16 June 1833.

Field Marshal Prince Kutuzov of Smolensk’s Jäger Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction in the pacification of Poland in 1831”), and 6th Battalion - 16 June 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions (with the inscription “1700-1850” and Alexander ribbons) - 25 June 1850.

Schlüsselburg Jäger Regiment, 6th Battalion - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions (St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons, with the inscription along the edges “For taking a flag from the French at Friedland 2 June 1807”, and under the eagle “1700-1850” ) - 25 June 1850.

Kostroma Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions (with Alexander ribbons and the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Nizovsk Jäger Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Vitebsk Jäger Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction at the siege and taking of Anapa and Varna 1828”), and 6th Battalion - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Aleksopol Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Bryansk Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions (with the inscription “For crossing the Danube 17 May 1828”) - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Tomsk Jäger Regiment, 3rd Battalion - 14 April 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834; 3rd and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions (with the inscription “For the pacification of Transylvania in 1849”) - 19 March 1850.

Okhotsk Jäger Regiment, 3rd Battalion - 22 June 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834.

Ukraine Jäger Regiment, 3rd Battalion - 22 June 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834.

Litovsk Jäger Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions - 11 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 1st Battalion (with the inscription “For the campaign to Andi in June and the taking of Dargo 6 July 1845”) - 20 March 1846; 2nd Battalion (with the same inscription) - 13 August 1846; 3rd Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction in battle against the Turks beyond the river Cholok 4 June 1854”) - 1854.

Podolia Jäger Regiment, 4th Battalion - 11 April 1834; 1st and 3rd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 4th Battalion 11 April 1846; 2nd Battalion - 13 August 1846.

Lublin Jäger Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions - 11 April 1834; 4th Battalion, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction in the war with the Turks 1828 and 1829”) - 28 February 1845; 1st Battalion (with the inscription “For the campaign to Andi in June and the taking of Dargo 6 July 1845”), and 3rd Battalion (with the inscription “For the taking of Andi 14 June and the campaign to Dargo in July 1845”) - 20 March 1846; 2nd Battalion (with the inscription “For the campaign to Andi in June and the taking of Dargo 6 July 1845”) - 13 August 1846.

Uglich Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 12 May 1833; 5th Battalion - 12 December 1836; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845.

Borodino Jäger Regiment (from 1839 H.I.H. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s), 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 12 May 1833; 5th Battalion - 12 December 1836; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845.

Belev Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions (with the inscription “For distinction in the war with the Turks in 1828 and 1829”) - 12 May 1833; 5th Battalion - 12 December 1836; 3rd Battalion - 25 February 1845.


4. The second Jäger regiments in brigades.

(Green cross, white corners, red stripes between the cross and corners.)

Kopore Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 16 June 1833.

Estonia Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 16 June 1833; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Velikie-Luki Jäger Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Ladoga Jäger Regiment, 6th Battalion - 30 April 1833; all battalions, Alexander ribbons and metal bands - 35 June 1838.

Galich Jäger Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Simbirsk Jäger Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Polotsk Jäger Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions (St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction in the siege and taking of Anapa and Varna 1828”), and 6th Battalion - 30 April.

Kremenchug Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 3rd and 4th Battalions (with Alexander ribbons and the inscription “1642-1842”) - 25 June 1842; 1st and 2nd (St.-George flags and Alexander ribbons with the inscription around the edges “For the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”, and under the eagle “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

General-Field Marshal the Prince of Warsaw Graf Paskevich of Erivan’s Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 30 April 1833; 1st and 2nd (with Alexander ribbons with the inscription around the edges 1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Kolyvan Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 14 April 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions (with the inscription For the pacification of Transylvania in 1849”) - 19 March 1850.

Kamchatka Jäger Regiment, 3rd and 6th Battalions - 22 June 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834.

Odessa Jäger Regiment, 3rd and 6th Battalions - 22 June 1833; 4th Battalion - 1 May 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Vilna Jäger Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions - 11 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 2nd Battalion - 13 August 1846; 1st and 2nd (with the inscription For the defeat of the Turks 14 November 1853 at Akhaltsykh”) - 1854.

Zhitomir Jäger Regiment, 4th Battalion - 11 April 1834; 1st and 2nd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 1st and 3rd Battalions (with the inscription “For the campaign to Andi in June 1845”), and 4th Battalion - 11 April 1846; 2nd Battalion (with the same inscription) - 13 August 1846.

Zamosc Jäger Regiment, 3rd and 4th Battalions - 11 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion (with the inscription “For distinction in the war with the Turks in 1828 and 1829”) - 28 February 1845; 2nd Battalion (with the inscription “For the campaign to Andi in June and to Dargo in July 1845”) - 20 March 1846; 2nd Battalion - 13 August 1846; 1st and 4th Battalions (with the inscription For the pacification of Transylvania in 1849”), and 3rd Battalion (with the inscription For distinction in the war with the Turks in 1828 and 1829 and the pacification of Transylvania in 1849”) - 19 March 1850.

Kazan Jäger Regiment (from 1839 to 1849 H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s, and from 1849 H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich’s), 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 12 May 1833; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Battalions (with the inscription “For distinction in the war with the Turks in 1828 and 1829”) - 20 March 1846; 2nd Battalion (with the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850.

Tarutino Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions - 12 May 1833; 5th Battalion - 12 December 1836; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1845.

Tula Jäger Regiment, 3rd, 4th, and 6th Battalions (with the inscription “For distinction in the war with the Turks in 1828 and 1829”) - 12 May 1833; 3rd Battalion - 12 December 1836; 3rd Battalion - 28 February 1843.

Flag poles in all jäger regiments remained black, as before.


ARMY CAVALRY

All standards newly presented to army cavalry regiments after 19 November 1825, except those (until 1833) in the Lithuanian Lancer Divisin, kept the pattern and dimensions of standards received during the reign of Emperor Alexander I by L.-Gds. Dragoon, Hussar, Lancer, and Cossack regiments, but all were green, with the personal monogram of Emperor Nicholas Pavlovich in the corners and the additional difference that on standards without inscriptions for martial distinction, their place was taken by embroidery depicting laurel branches tied with ribbons (Illus. 1319a). Such standards were granted to the following units:

1. Cuirassier regiments.

Yekaterinoslav Cuirassier Regiment (from 1839 H.I.H. Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna’s), 4th Double-Squadron (St.-George standards with the inscription “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”) - 3 April 1834, with silver embroidery and orange corners; Alexander ribbons for all double-squadrons - 25 June 1838.

Glukhov Cuirassier Regiment (from 1832 to 1849 H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s, and from 1849 H.I.H. Grand Duchess Alexandra Iosifovna’s), 4th Double-Squadron (St.-George standard with the inscription “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”) - 3 April 1834, with silver embroidery and dark-blue corners.

Astrakhan Cuirassier Regiment (from 1838 to 1851 Prince Wilhelm of Prussia’s), 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834, with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Pskov Cuirassier Regiment (from 1842 H.I.H. the Tsarevich’s), 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834, with silver embroidery and rose corners; all double-squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Military Order Cuirassier Regiment , 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834, with gold embroidery and black corners; all double-squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838.

Starodub Cuirassier Regiment (from 1840 Prince Peter of Oldenburg’s), 4th Double-Squadron (St.-George standard with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Bazardzhik by storm 22 May 1810”) - 3 April 1834, with gold embroidery and dark-blue corners.

Prince Albert of Prussia’s Little-Russia Cuirassier Regiment, 4th Double-Squadron (with the inscription “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”) - 3 April 1834, with gold embroidery and green corners.

H.I.H. Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna’s Cuirassier Regiment, 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834, with gold embroidery and raspberry corners.


2. Dragoon regiments.

Moscow Dragoon Regiment (from 1837 H.I.H. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s), 4th Double-Squadron - 5 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (with the inscription “1700-1850”) - 25 June 1850; with gold embroidery and red corners.

Kargopol Dragoon Regiment (from 1842 H.I.H. Grand Duke Constantine Nikolaevich’s), 4th Double-Squadron (with the inscription “For feats at Schöngraben 4 November 1805 in a battle of a 5-thousand man corps with an enemy numbering 30,000”); 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; with gold embroidery and white corners.

Kinburn Dragoon Regiment, 4th Double-Squadron - 5 April 1834; with gold embroidery and yellow corners.

New-Russia Dragoon Regiment, 4th Double-Squadron - 5 April 1834; with gold embroidery and dark-blue corners.

Kazan Dragoon Regiment, 3rd Double-Squadron - 27 November 1832; 4th Double-Squadron - 5 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; with gold embroidery and red corners.

Riga Dragoon Regiment, 4th Double-Squadron - 5 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 July 1838; with gold embroidery and dark-blue corners.

Finland Dragoon Regiment, 4th Double-Squadron - 5 April 1834; with gold embroidery and yellow corners.

Tver Dragoon Regiment (from 1837 to 1849 H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s, from 1849 H.I.H. Grand Duke Nicholas Nikoklaevich’s), 4th Double-Squadron - 5 April 1834; with gold embroidery and yellow corners.

Nizhnii-Novgorod Dragoon Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (St.-George standards with gold embroidery, red corners, and the inscription “For distinction shown in the Persian War 1826, 1827 and 1828”) - 27 June 1828; all double-squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; 4th Double-Squadron (St.-George standard with the inscription “For distinguished feats in Chechnya in 1851”) - 25 March 1851.


3. Horse-Jäger regiments.

Pereyaslavl Horse-Jäger Regiment (21 March 1833 used to reinforce the Pavlograd Hussar Regiment, H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s Hussar Regiment, and the Kazan Dragoon Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 7 August 1830; with silver embroidery and raspberry corners.

H.M. the King of Württemberg’s Horse-Jäger Regiment (21 March 1833 used to reinforce the Mitau Hussar Regiment, Archduke Ferdinand’s Hussar Regiment, and the Riga Dragoon Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 7 August 1830; with silver embroidery and red corners.

Arzamas Horse-Jäger Regiment (21 March 1833 used to reinforce the Yamburg Lancer Regiment,New-Russia Dragoon Regiment, and Tver Dragoon Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 7 August 1830; with silver embroidery and sky-blue corners.

Tiraspol Horse-Jäger Regiment (21 March 1833 used to reinforce H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s Lancer Regiment—now H.I.H. Michael Nikolaevich’s, the Finland Dragoon Regiment, and the Kargopol Dragoon Regiment—lager H.I.H. Grand Duke Constantine Nikolaevich’s), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 7 August 1830; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Standards were designated for these four regiments but never issued. After the general reorganization of army cavalry in 1833 they became double-squadrons of various lancer, hussar, and dragoon regiments, and before that time did not have standards.


4. Lancer regiments.

Borisoglebsk Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 2 April 1833; with silver embroidery and orange corners.

Serpukhov Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 2 April 1833; with silver embroidery and sky-blue corners.

Orenburg Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 19 June 1828; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Siberia Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 19 June 1828; with silver embroidery and white corners.

Courland Lancer Regiment (from 1843 H.I.H. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s Lancer Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron -7 April 1834; with gold embroidery and dark-blue corners.

Smolensk Lancer Regiment (from 1843 H.I.H. Grand Duke Nicholas Aleksandrovich’s Lancer Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 8 July 1833; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; with gold embroidery and white corners.

Kharkov Lancer Regiment (from 1851 H.R.H. Prince Frederick of Prussia’s Lancer Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 8 July 1833; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (St.-George standards with Alexander ribbons and the inscriptions along the edges “For distinction against the enemy in the battle of Katzbach 14 August 1813” and under the eagle “1651-1851” ) - 27 July 1851; with gold embroidery and yellow corners.

Lithuania Lancer Regiment (from 1839 H.I.H. Archduke Albert of Austria’s Lancer Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron (Alexander ribbon, with the inscription “For distinction in the war with the French”) - 8 July 1833; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Volhynia Lancer Regiment (from 1847 H.I.H. Grand Duke Constantine Nikolaevich’s Lancer Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 8 July 1833; with silver embroidery and dark-blue corners.

Voznesensk Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 1 January 1832; 4th Double-Squadron - 6 April 1834; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Olviopol Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (with the inscription “For distinction at the subjugation of the town of Enos in 1829”) - 20 February 1830; 4th Double-Squadron - 6 April 1834; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Bug Lancer Regiment, 2nd and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 1 January 1832; 4th Double-Squadron - 6 April 1834; with silver embroidery and red corners.

Odessa Lancer Regiment (from 1845 H.H. the Duke of Nassau’s Lancer Regiment), three standards - 1 January 1832; 4th Double-Squadron - 6 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Double-Squadrons (St.-George Standards with the inscription “For distinguished feats in the suppression of revolt in Transylvania in 1849”) - 24 September 1849; with silver embroidery and red corners.

Belgorod Lancer Regiment (from 1842 H.I.H. Archduke Karl-Ferdinand of Austria’s Lancer Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 2 April 1833; 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 July 1838; 4th Double-Squadron - 31 December 1851; with silver embroidery and raspberry corners.

Chuguev Lancer Regiment (from 1850 General-of-Cavalry Graf Nikitin’s Lancer Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 2 April 1833; 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 July 1838; 4th Double-Squadron - 31 December 1851; with silver embroidery and white corners.

Ukraine Lancer Regiment (from 1849 H.I.H. Archduke Leopold of Austria’s Lancer Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 1 January 1832; 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834; 4th Double-Squadron - 31 December 1851; with silver embroidery and red corners.

Novo-Archangelsk Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 1 January 1832; 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834; 4th Double-Squadron - 31 December 1851; with silver embroidery and white corners.

Novo-Mirgorod Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 1 January 1832; 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834; 4th Double-Squadron - 31 December 1851; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Yelisavetgrad Lancer Regiment (from 1851 H.I.H. Grand Duchess Catherine Mikhailovna’s Lancer Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 1 January 1832; 4th Double-Squadron - 3 April 1834; 4th Double-Squadron - 31 December 1851; with silver embroidery and dark-blue corners.

H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s Lancer Regiment (from 1849 H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Nikolaevich’s Lancer Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 1 June 1833; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons 25 June 1838; with gold embroidery and yellow corners.

Yamburg Lancer Regiment (from 1837 H.R.H. Prince Frederick of Württemberg’s Lancer Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 1 July 1833; with silver embroidery and dark-blue corners.


5. Hussar regiments.

Irkutsk Hussar Regiment (21 March 1833 used to reinforce the Lubny, Ingermanland, and Aleksandriya Hussar Regiments, and the Volhynia Lancer Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 19 June 1828; with gold embroidery and raspberry corners.

Sumy Hussar Regiment, 4th Double-Squadron - 7 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (St.-George standards with Alexander ribbons and the inscription along the edges “In recognition of distinguished feats performed in the successfully concluded campaign of 1814”, and under the eagle “1651 1851”) - 27 July 1851; with gold embroidery and red corners.

Klyastitsy Hussar Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (plain standards) and the 4th Double-Squadron (St.-George standards with an Alexander ribbon, with the inscription “For feats at Schöngraben 4 November 1805 in a battle of a 5000-man corps with an enemy numbering 30,000”) - 7 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (with Alexander ribbons and the inscription “1651 1851”) - 27 July 1851; with silver embroidery and dark-blue corners.

Yelisavetgrad Hussar Regiment (from 1845 H.I.H. Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna’s Hussar Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 19 June 1828; 4th Double-Squadron - 8 July 1833; with gold embroidery and dark-blue corners.

Lubny Hussar Regiment (from 1838 to 1851 H. M. the King of Hannover’s Hussar Regiment), four standards - 8 July 1833; 4th Double-Squadron - 8 July 1833; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Field Marshal Graf Wittgenstein’s Mariupol Hussar Regiment (from 1843 Prince Frederick of Hesse-Kassel’s Hussar Regiment), four standards - 8 July 1833; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

The Prince of Orange’s Belorussia Hussar Regiment (from 1840 to 1849 H. M. the King of the Netherlands’ Hussar Regiment, from 1849 General-Field Marshal Graf Radetzky’s), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (plain standards) and 4th Double-Squadron (St.-George standard with an Alexander ribbon and the inscription “For feats at Schöngraben 4 November 1805 in a battle of a 5000-man corps with an enemynumbering 30,000”) - 8 July 1833; with silver embroidery and dark-blue corners.

Pavlograd Hussar Regiment (from 1838 H.I.H. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s Hussar Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 6 April 1834; with gold embroidery and turquoise corners.

Archduke Ferdinand’s Izyum Hussar Regiment (from 1851 H.R.H. Prince Frederick-Wilhelm of Prussia’s Hussar Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 6 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (with Alexander ribbons and inscriptions around the edges “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, and under the eagle “1651-1851”) - 27 July 1851; with gold embroidery and white corners.

H.R.H. Prince Frederick-Karl of Prussia’s Akhtyrka Hussar Regiment (from 1845 General-Adjutant Prince Vasilchikov’s Hussar Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 6 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (St.-George standards with Alexander ribbons and inscriptions around the edges “In recognition of distinguished courage and bravery shown in the successfully concluded campaign of 1814”, and under the eagle “1651-1851”) - 27 July 1851; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Aleksandriya Hussar Regiment (from 1845 General-Field Marshal the Prince of Warsaw Graf Paskevich of Erivan’s Hussar Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons (St.-George standards with the inscription “For distinction in the Turkish war of 1829”) - 31 October 1831; 4th Double-Squadron - 6 April 1834; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

Kiev Hussar Regiment (from 1839 H.I.H. Duke Maximillian of Leuchtenberg’s Hussar Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 7 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; with gold embroidery and red corners.

Ingermanland Hussar Regiment (from 1841 The Crown Prince of the Grand Duchy of Saxon-Weimar’s Hussar Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 7 April 1834; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; with gold embroidery and dark-blue corners.

H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s Narva Hussar Regiment (from 1849 H.I.H. Grand Duke Constantine Nikolaevich’s Hussar Regiment), 4th Double-Squadron - 1 June 1833; 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons, Alexander ribbons - 25 June 1838; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.

H.M. the King of Württemberg’s Mitau Hussar Regiment, 4th Double-Squadron - 1 June 1833; with silver embroidery and yellow corners.


6. Lancer regiments in the Lithuanian Lancer Division.

Polish Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 29 October 1827; standards of the same size as before, but raspberry, with HIGHEST gold monograms, silver embroidery, fringe, cords, tassels, stripes on the poles, and spearheads; the spearhead of a different pattern from those of the standards described above; in the lower part the embroidered silver Cyrillic letters P. U. P., signifying the regiment’s name (Illus. 1319b).

Tatar Lancer Regiment (21 March 1833 used to reinforce the Kargopol, Kinburn, New-Russia, and Riga Dragoon Regiments, and the Kharkov and Siberia Lancer Regiments), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 6 December 1827; as above, but with the Cyrillic letters T. U. P.

Lithuania Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 13 September 1828; as above, but with the Cyrillic letters L. U. P.

Volhynia Lancer Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 23 December 1827; as above, but with the Cyrillic letters V. U. P.

Up to 1831 all standards of these four regiments had the image of a Lithuanian horseman on the eagle’s shield, and since that year—an image of St. George.


SAPPER AND PIONEER BATTALIONS.

With the exception of colors, all flags granted to sapper and pioneer battalions after 19 November 1825 were similar to the flags of jäger regiments and all had yellow poles. These flags were granted to the following battalions:

Instructional Sapper Battalion - 14 April 1827; sky-blue cross, yellow corners, black stripes between the cross and corners (Illus. 1320a).

Sapper Battalion, Grenadier Corps - (from 25 October 1829 the Grenadier Sapper Battalion) - 22 February 1828; green cross, corners half yellow and half red, black stripes between the cross and corners (Illus. 1320b); the same but a St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinction at the siege and taking of Brailov and Silistria in 1828 and 1829” - 6 April 1830.

1st Pioneer Battalion (from 25 October 1829 the 1st Sapper Battalion).

2nd Pioneer Battalion (from 25 October 1829 the 1st Reserve Sapper Battalion) and 5th Pioneer Battalion (from 25 October 1829 the 2nd Sapper Battalion) - 22 February 1828; green cross, white corners, black stripes between the cross and corners (Illus. 1320c).

Lithuania Sapper Battalion (from 28 April 1831 the 6th Sapper Battalion, and from 20 October 1831 the 3rd Sapper Battalion) - 25 March 1828; green cross, corners half white and half raspberry, black stripes between the cross and corners (Illus. 1320d); in the eagle’s shield an image of a Lithuanian horseman, replaced in 1831 by an image of St. George.

4th Sapper Battalion - 7 March 1833, the same as for the 1st, 2nd, and 5th Pioneer Battalions; 29 December 1849 - St.-George flag with the inscription “For building a crossing over the river Teisa in the pacification of Hungary in 1849”.

6th Pioneer Battalion (from 25 October 1829 the 5th Sapper Battalion) - 22 February 1828, the same as granted on this day to the 1st, 2nd, and 5th Pioneer Battalions; 6 April 1830 - St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinction during the crossing of the Balkan range in 1829”; 30 March 1846 - St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinction during the crossing of the Balkan range in 1829, the campaign to Andi in June and the taking of Dargo 6 July 1845”.

4th Pioneer Battalion (from 26 October 1829 the 4th Sapper Battalion, and from 20 February 1822 the 6th Sapper Battalion) - 29 September 1828; green cross, white corners, black stripes between the cross and corners; the same flag but of St.-George pattern, with the inscription “For distinction during the siege and taking of the fortress of Varna”.

2nd Reserve Sapper Battalion (disbanded 23 December 1841) - 7 March 1833, identical to those granted to the 1st, 2nd, and 5th Pioneer Battalions.

3rd Reserve Sapper Battalion (from 23 December 1841 the 2nd Reserve Sapper Battalion) - 6 December 1833, the same as the preceding flag.

8th Pioneer Battalion (from 25 October 1829 the Caucasus Sapper Battalion) - 13 September 1828, the same as the preceding flag, but a St.-George pattern with the inscription “For distinction during the taking by storm of Akhaltsykh in 1828”.

1st Horse-Pioneer Double-Squadron - 28 February 1828, a standard with silver embroidery and red corners


RIFLE BATTALIONS.

2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th Rifle Battalions - 25 September 1849.


LINE BATTALIONS.

The flags granted to these battalions have a white cross and green corners, no monograms, and white poles (Illus. 1321). Such flags were granted to the following battalions.

1. Finland Line Battalions.
No. 1 - 3 July 1835 (from the 2nd Battalion of the former Nyslott Jäger Regiment, which had been granted on 18 March 1807).
No. 2 - 3 July 1835 (from the 3rd Battalion of the former Nyslott Jäger Regiment, which had been granted on 17 September 1833); 25 June 1850 - with the inscription under the eagle “1700-1850” and with an Alexander ribbon.
No. 4 - 3 July 1835 (from the 2nd Battalion of the former Petrovsk Infanry Regiment, which had been granted 30 September 1830).
No. 5 - 3 July 1835, with the inscription “For distinction in the war against the French 1812, 1813 and 1814” (from the 3rd Battalion of the Petrovsk Infantry Regiment, which had been granted 17 September 1833); 26 June 1850, with Alexander ribbons and inscriptions around the edges “For distinction in the war against the French 1812, 1813 and 1814”, and under the eagle “1700-1850”.
No. 6 - 3 July 1835 (from the 2nd Battalion of the former Vilmanstrand Jäger Regiment, which had been granted on 16 March 1807).
No. 7 - 3 July 1835 (from the 3rd Battalion of the former Vilmanstrand Jäger Regiment, which had been granted on 17 September 1833); 25 June 1850, with an Alexander ribbon and the inscription under the eagle “1700-1850”.
No. 9 - 3 July 1835 (from the 2nd Battalion of the formber Viborg Infantry Regiment, which had been granted 5 April 1798); 25 June 1850, with an Alexander ribbon and the inscription under the eagle “1700-1850”.
No. 10 - 25 June 1838, with an Alexander ribbon.
No. 12 - 3 July 1835, with the inscription “For distinction in the war against the French 1812, 1813 and 1814” (from the 3rd Battalion of the former Viborg Infantry Regiment, which had been granted 17 September 1833); 25 June 1850, with Alexander ribbons and inscriptions around the edges “For distinction in the war against the French 1812, 1813 and 1814”, and under the eagle “1700-1850”.
2. Orenburg Line Battalions.
Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 - 26 February 1835.
3. Siberian Line Battalions.
Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 - 26 February 1835.
No. 14 - 1 March 1830.
No. 15 - 4 November 1835.
Nos. 1, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 15 - 25 June 1838, Alexander ribbons.
4. Georgia Line Battalions.
No. 1 (as Black-Sea Line Battalion No. 10) - 8 April 1834 (from the 3rd Battalion of the former Mingrelia Infantry Regiment, which had been granted on 31 March 1807).
Nos. 8 and 9 - 26 February 1835.
No. 11 (as Georgia Line Battalion No. 12) - 8 April 1834 (from the 3rd Battalion of the Crimea Infantry Regiment, which had been granted on 30 September 1803).
No. 12 (as Georgia Line Battalion 14 - 7 April 1834 (from the 3rd Battalion of the former Kozlov Infantry Regiment, which had been granted 5 December 1797).
No. 13 (as Caucaus Line Battalion 9 - 8 April 1834 (from the number received by the former Astrakhan Garrison Regiment on 1 October 1800); 25 June 1838, an Alexander ribbon.
No. 14 - 25 June 1850, with an Alexander ribbon and the inscription “1700-1850”.
No. 16 (as Georgia Line Battalion No. 10) - 18 January 1830 and 26 February 1835.
No. 18 (as Georgia Line Battalion No. 13) - 8 April 1834 (from the 3rd Battalion of the former Sevastopol Infantry Regiment, which had been granted on 1 January 1809); 25 June 1838, an Alexander ribbon.
5. Black-Sea Line Battalions.
No. 1 and No. 2 - 26 February 1835.
No. 4 - 14 April 1851.
No. 5 - 8 April 1834, St.-George flags with the inscription “For the defense of Bayazet fortress 20 and 21 June 1829” (from the 2nd Battalion of the former Nasheburg Infantry Regiment, which had been granted on 22 August 1829); 25 June 1838, an Alexander ribbon.
No. 6 (as Black-Sea Line Battalion No. 4) - 8 April 1834, the same as the preceding (from the 1st Battalion of the former Nasheburg Infantry Regiment).
No. 8 (as Black-Sea Line Battalion No. 7) - 15 November 1841, with the inscription “For distinction in the wars with Persia in 1826, 1827 and 1828, and with Turkey in 1828 and 1829” (in place of St.-George trumpets obtained by the battalion from a battalion of the 44th Jäger Regiment); 25 June 1850 - with an Alexander ribbon and the inscription under the eagle “1700-1850”.
No. 9 - 25 June 1850, with an Alexander ribbon and the inscription under the eagle “1700-1850”.
No. 10 - 15 November 1841 (as Black-Sea Line Battalion No. 9), with the inscription “For distinction in the wars with Persia in 1826 and 1827 and 1828 and with Turkey in 1828 and 1829” (in place of St.-George trumpets the battalion obtained from a battalion of the 44th Jäger Regiment); 25 June 1855, with the same inscription along the edges, and under the eagle “1700-1850”.
No. 11 (as Black-Sea Line Battalion No. 8) - 8 April 1834 (from the 2nd Battalion of the former Mingrelia Infantry Regiment, which had been granted on 31 March 1807).

6. Caucasus line battalions.
No. 3 (as Caucasus Line Battalion No. 7) - 8 April 1834 , St.-George flag with the inscription “For the defense of the Bayazet fortress 20 and 21 June 1829” (from the 3rd Battalion of the Nasheburg Infantry Regiment); 25 June 1838, an Alexander ribbon.
No. 4 (as Caucasus Line Battalion No. 5) - 19 April 1829 (from the 2nd Battalion of the former Vladikavkaz Garrison Regiment); 26 February 1835.
No. 6 (as Caucasus Line Battalion No. 3) - 8 April 1834 (from the 3rd Battalion of the Tenginsk Infantry Regiment); 25 June 1838, an Alexander ribbon.
No. 8 (as Caucasus Line Battalion No. 6) - 19 April 1829 (from the 3rd Battalion of the former Vladikavkaz Garrison Regiment); 26 February 1835.
No. 10 (as Caucasus Line Battalion No. 4) - 19 April 1829 (from the 1st Battalion of the former Vladikavkaz Garrison Regiment); 26 February 1835.
No. 13 (as Caucasus Line Battalion No. 9) - 26 February 1835.

GUARDS INFANTRY.

Up to 5 August 1830 new flags were presented with gilded spearheads, as previously, but after this date—with cast eagles of gilded or silvered bronze, according to the color of the uniform buttons. Spearhead finials were replaced by this eagles throughout the Guards infantry. After 19 November 1825, new flags were presented to the following regiments:

L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii Regiment - 22 August 1850, St.-George flags with the inscription around the edges “For feats performed in the battle of 17 August 1813 at Kulm”, and under the eagle “1683-1700-1850”, in commemoration of 150 years since the designation of the regiment as Life-Guards. The flags have St.-Andrew ribbons and metal bands based on an order of 25 June 1838. (For the replacement battalion there was a flag with the same inscription but without the “1850” under the eagle; ; upon the disbandment of this battalion this flag was turned in to St.-Petersburg Arsenal.)

L.-Gds. Semenovskii Regiment - 22 August 1850, St.-George flags with the inscription around the edges “For feats performed in the battle of 17 August 1813 at Kulm”, and under the eagle “1683-1700-1850”, in commemoration of 150 years since the designation of the regiment as Life-Guards. The flags have St.-Andrew ribbons and metal bands.

L.-Gds. Izmailovskii Regiment - 11 June 1850, St.-George flags with St.-Andrew ribbons and metal bands, with the inscription “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, in commemoration of 50 years since the naming of the Sovereign Emperor as the regiment’s honorary colonel [shef].

L.-Gds. Jäger Regiment, 2nd Battalion - 14 November 1828, St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinction at the siege and taking of Anapa and Varna 1828”, with coloring the same as the flags of the regiment’s other battalions, i.e. yellow cross, corners half green and half white, black pole (Illus. 1322a).

L.-Gds. Sapper Battalion - 29 September 1829, St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Varna 1828”, with coloring the same as for this battalion’s previous plain flag, i.e. yellow cross, white corners, black stripes between the cross and corners, the pole of lacquered mountain-ash (Illus. 1322b).

L.-Gds. Moscow Regiment - 22 August 1850, St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons and the inscription along the edges “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, and under the eagle “1683-1700-1850”, in commemoration of 150 years since the naming of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment as Life Guards, from part of which regiment was formed the L.-Gds. Lithuania Regiment that later came to form the L.-Gds. Moscow Regiment.

L.-Gds. Lithuania Regiment, 2nd (later 3rd) Battalion - 1 August 1832, St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, with coloring the same as the flags of the regiment’s other battalions, i.e. yellow cross, corners half red and half green, yellow pole (Illus. 1322c); 22 August 1850, all battalions were given St.-George flags with Alexander ribbons and the inscription along the edges “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, and under the eagle “1683-1700-1850”, in commemoration of 150 years since the naming of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment as Life Guards, from part of which regiment was formed the L.-Gds. Lithuania Regiment.

L.-Gds. Volhynia Regiment, 2nd (later 3rd) Battalion - 1 August 1832, St.-George flags with the inscription “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, with coloring the same as the flags of the regiment’s other battalions, i.e. yellow cross, green corners, black pole (Illus. 1322d).

L.-Gds. Finnish Rifle Battalion - 4 September 1829, yellow cross, dark-blue corners; on the eagle’s breast, in a red shield, is painted in gold the coat-of-arms of the Grand Duchy of Finland, i.e. a lion with a raised sword, standing on a saber and surrounded by gold stars; black pole (Illus. 1323a).

For this same battalion, on 6 December 1833 - St. George flags with the inscription “For distinction in the pacification of Poland in 1831”, yellow cross, sky-blue corners of which two opposite to each other have HIGHEST monograms, and the two others the coat-of-arms of the Grand Duchy of Finland as described above; black pole; the middle is as for all flags in the Russian army with an image of St. George in the eagle’s shield (Illus. 1323b).

L.-Gds. Garrison Battalion - 11 July 1827, St. George flags with the inscription “In commemoration of the feats of the Guards troops in 1812, 1813 and 1814”, white cross, corners, and poles (Illus. 1323c).

The replacement, or fourth, battalions of all twelve regiments of Guards infantry were granted new flags on 11 May 1832. These were as the flags for the other battalions. L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii Regiment - corners half red and half white, yellow pole; L.-Gds. Semenovskii Regiment - corners light blue and white, black pole; L.-Gds. Izmailovskii Regiment - white corners, white pole; L.-Gds. Jäger Regiment - corners green and white, black pole; L.-Gds. Moscow Regiment - corners red and black, yellow pole; L.-Gds. Grenadier Regiment - corners light-blue and black, white pole; L.-Gds. Finland Regiment - corners green and black, black pole; L.-Gds. Lithuania Regiment - corners red and green, yellow pole; L.-Gds. Volhynia Regiment - green corners, black pole. All ten were St.-George flags, with eagles, and for all ten the cross was yellow. On the first two flags the inscription “For feats performed in the battle of 17 August 1813 at Kulm”, and on the remaining eight—“For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”. Flags of the four battalions of the grenadier regiments of H.M. the Emperor of Austria and H.M. the King of Prussia (later the regiment of King Frederick-Wilhelm III) were plain for both regiments, without inscriptions, with a green cross and red and white corners. For the first of these two regiments the flag poles were black, and for the second—white.


GUARDS CAVALRY.

In the Guards cavalry, after 19 November 1825 new standards were presented to the following units (up to 5 August 1830 standards were issued with flat spearheads, as before, but after that date—with cast silvered eagles for units with that color of uniform buttons; the same eagles, gilded, replaced spearheads throughout the Guards cavalry in regiments with yellow buttons):

H.M. Cavalier Guards Regiment - 1 July 1851, St.-George standard with the inscription “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, in commemoration of 25 years since the Sovereign Empress was named honorary colonel of the regiment.

L.-Gds. Horse Regiment - 27 June 1851, St.-George standards with St.-Andrew ribbons for the metal bands, with the inscriptions “For capturing several enemy flags at Austerlitz and for distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, in commemoration of 50 years since the placement of the Sovereign Emperor on the rolls of the regiment.

L.-Gds. Horse-Grenadier Regiment (formerly the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment) - 27 June 1851, in commemoration of 200 years since the formation from Little-Russian cossacks of units that would serve as the basis of the regiment: St.-George standards with St.-Andrew ribbons and the inscriptions around the edges “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, and under the eagle “1651-1851”.

L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment - 27 June 1851, in commemoration of 200 years since the formation from Little-Russian cossacks of units that would serve as the basis of the regiment: St.-George standards with St.-Andrew ribbons and metal bands, and the inscription around the edges “For taking an enemy flag at Krasnoe and for distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812 ”, and under the eagle “1651-1851”.

L.-Gds. Horse-Pioneer Squadron - 14 December 1826, white with yellow cross, with black stripes on the sides, silver embroidery and fringe, with an orange circle in the center on which is embroidered the two-headed Russian eagle usual for standards throughout the Russian army (Illus. 1324b).

L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment (later the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment), 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Double-Squadrons - 24 July 1827, standards similar to the one preceding, but without the yellow cross (Illus. 1324a).

H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment (from 1849 H.I.H. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment), 3rd Double-Squadron - 7 September 1832, St.-George standard with the inscription “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”, identical, with the exception of the monograms, to the standards of the regiment’s other double-squadrons, presented by Emperor Alexander I, i.e. white with silver embroidery, silver fringe, and dark-blue corners; 27 June 1851 - for all double-squadrons, in commemoration of 200 years since the formation from Little-Russian cossacks of units that would serve as the basis of the regiment: St.-George standards with St.-Andrew ribbons, with metal bands and the existing inscription, and under the eagle“1651-1851”.

L.-Gds. Grodno Hussar Regiment, 1st and 2nd Double-Squadrons - 19 October 1827, standards identical to those granted in 1827 and 1828 to regiments in the Lithuania Lancer Division, described above, except with the change of the color raspberry to white, with the Cyrillic letters L. G. G. G. P. under the eagle, signifying the L.-Gds. Grodno Hussar Regiment. (In the 1st and 2nd Double-Squadrons of the H.I.H. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment (formerly H.I.H. Grand Duke Michael Pavlovich’s) and of the Grodno Hussars there was, until 1831, an image of a Lithuanian horseman in the eagle’s shield, replaced at this time by an image of St. George); 3rd Double-Squadron - 7 September 1832, standard of the pattern described for Army cavalry, but all white, with silver embroidery and fringe and the same letters under the eagle—L. G. G. G. P. (Illus. 1325).


MODEL REGIMENTS.

On 22 December 1836 the Model Infantry Regiment was granted two flags with white poles, in all respects similar to the flags of Army infantry regiments, but with a white cross and green corners instead of a green cross and white corners (Illus. 1326a).

On 17 November 1836 the Model Cavalry Regiment was granted a standard of the pattern described above for Army cavalry standards, but in white with green corners, and with gold embroidery and fringe (Illus. 1326b).


INSTRUCTIONAL CARABINIER REGIMENTS.

These regiments were granted flags of the pattern for infantry regiments, with black poles and a light-blue cross instead of green, and with corners of the following colors:

1st Instructional Regiment, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Battalions - 16 January 1837, corners half red and half white (Illus. 1327c).

2nd Instructional Regiment - 11 June 1832, 1st and 2nd Battalions, corners half white and half yellow (Illus. 1327a); these same battalions - 15 January 1837, white corners (Illus. 1327b); 3rd Battalion - 9 June 1849.

3rd Instructional Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - 16 January 1837, corners half white and half yellow (Illus. 1327a); 3rd Battalion - 9 June 1849.

4th Instructional Regiment, 1st and 2nd Battalions - 16 January 1837, corners half white and half green (Illus. 1327d); 3rd Battalion - 9 June 1849.


CADET CORPS.

Military educational institutions were granted flags of the pattern for Guards and Army infantry regiments, but with a red cross and variously colored corners as prescribed for each establishment. Following the example of Guards troops, up to 5 August 1830 the flags of military educational institutions had spearheads on the poles, but after that date these were replaced by eagles of gilded bronze. Flags were presented to the following educational establishments.

Imperial Military Orphans’ Home (from 22 February 1829 the Paul Cadet Corps) - 31 December 1826, yellow corners (Illus. 1328a).

Moscow Cadet Corps (from 6 December 1837 the 1st Moscow Cadet Corps) - 18 February 1827, corners half white and half yellow (Illus. 1328b).

1st Cadet Corps - 17 February 1832, white corners on which two of the opposite ones had an image of the Imperial monogram normally seen on flags, and on the two other corners was painted in gold the corps coat-of-arms, i.e. a crossed sword and staff of Mercury, bound with a ribbon. Under the eagle, in the lower part of the gold wreath, on a sky-blue ribbon was the gold inscription “17 February 1732, 17 February 1832” (Illus. 1328c).

Graf Arakcheev’s Novgorod Cadet Corps - 29 October 1837, corners half green and half white (Illus. 1329a).

Polotsk Cadet Corps - on the same date, corners light blue and yellow (Illus. 1329b).

23 February 1844 - It is ordered that as a rule, each provincial cadet corps would receive its flag once the corps had its third company fully organized and armed.

9 May 1844 - It is ordered that cadet corps flags have a red cross as before, with corners of the following colors:
1st Cadet Corps - white, as before.
2nd Cadet Corps - half white and half yellow, as up to now was prescribed for the 1st Moscow Cadet Corps (Illus. 1329d). (The 2nd Cadet Corps had a flag since the reign of Emperor Alexander I.)
Paul Cadet Corps - half light blue and half yellow, as until this time was prescribed for the Polotsk Cadet Corps (Illus. 1329b).
Graf Arakcheev’s Novgorod Cadet Corps - half light green and half yellow (Illus. 1329c).
Nobiliary Regiment - half dark green and half yellow.
1st Moscow Cadet Corps - half yellow and half black (Illus. 1330a).
2nd Moscow Cadet Corps - half white and half black.
Orel-Bakhtin Cadet Corps - half light blue and half black.
Michael-Voronezh Cadet Corps - half light green and half black.
Kazan Cadet Corps - half light blue and half black.
Polotsk Cadet Corps - half yellow and half dark green (Illus. 1330b).
Peter-Poltava Cadet Corps - half white and half dark green (Illus. 1330c).
Alexander-Brest Cadet Corps - half light blue and half dark green.
Tula Cadet Corps - half light green and half dark green.

Of these corps the 2nd Moscow, Kazan, and Tula were still only proposed to be established. The 1st Cadet Corps and Nobiliary Regiment kept their previous flags. In the Paul, Novgorod, 1st Moscow, and Polotsk corps the flags were changed on the basis of the HIGHEST Order of 9 May 1844. The following received new flags: 2nd Cadet Corps - 19 August 1844; Poltava Cadet Corps - 27 June 1844; Michael-Voronezh Cadet Corps - 29 October 1848.

On 25 November 1842 the following pole colors were prescribed for the flags of cadet corps:
1st, 1st Moscow, and Polotsk—yellow.
2nd, 2nd Moscow, and Peter-Poltava—white.
Paul, Orel-Bakhtin, and Alexander-Brest—coffee.
Graf Arakcheev’s Novgorod and Michael-Voronezh—black.
Nobiliary Regiment—yellow. (The Nobiliary Regiment also had flags from the reign of Emperor Alexander I.)

IRREGULAR FORCES.

The Don Host has a St.-George flag with the inscription “To the loyal Don Host for its services during campaigns: against the Persians in 1826, 1827 and 1828, and against the Turks in 1828 and 1829”, granted on 23 February 1832 (Illus. 1331a); St.-George flag with the inscription “For the deeds of the Don Host in the campaign to pacify Hungary and Transylvania 1849”, granted 26 November 1849.

The L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment has St.-George standards with the inscriptions “For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812” and “For feats performd at the battle of Leipzig 4 October 1813”, granted 15 March 1826.

H.I.H. the Heir and Tsesarevich’s Leib-Ataman Regiment was ordered to have silver eagles instead of spearheads on the poles of its bunchuk standard and flag, after the pattern for Guards light cavalry, and instead of silver cords and tassels it was to have a St.-George ribbon (16 January and 25 February 1853).

The Don No. 1 Regiment has a plain flag with the inscription “For a distinguished feat during the pacification of Transylvania in 1849”, granted 19 March 1850 (Illus. 1331b). Don No. 38 Regiment has a St.-George flag with the inscription “For exemplary courage shown during the victory over a mountain tribesmen horde on 3 June 1844 at the Gilli settlement”, granted 7 May 1845 (Illus. 1332).

The Black Sea Host has a St.-George flag with the inscription “To the loyal host for fifty years of faithful and zealous service marked by brave deeds”, granted 10 October 1843 (Illus. 1333a).


Black-Sea horse regiments.

No. 1 - 21 September 1831, plain flag with the inscription “For distinction in the war with Persia and Turkey in 1827, 1828 and 1829” (Illus. 1333b).

No. 2 - 23 September 1844, plain flag without an inscription (from the 14 flags presented to the Black Sea Host on 10 February 1801).

Nos. 3, 4, 7, 10, 11, and 12 - 23 September 1844, one plain flag each, without inscriptions (from the 6 flags presented to the Host on 31 May 1803).

Nos. 5 and 6 - 23 September 1844, one plain flag each, with the inscription “For distinction in the Turkish war in 1829” (Illus. 1333c).

Nos. 8 and 9 - 23 September 1844, one plain flag each with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Anapa fortress 12 June 1828” (Illus. 1334a).


Black-Sea foot battalions.

No. 1 - 23 September 1844, plain flag with the inscription “For distinction 29 May 1838 at the defeat of the Turkish flotilla at Brailov” (Illus. 1334b).

Nos. 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, and 9 - 14 March 1845, one plain flag each (Illus. 1334c).

Nos. 5 and 8 - 23 September 1844, with the inscription “For distinction at the taking of Anapa fortress 12 June 1828” (Illus. 1334d).


Caucasian Line Cossack Host regiments.

1st Caucasian, 1st and 2nd Laba, 1st and 2nd Stavropol, 1st Khoper, 1st Volga, and Vladikavkaz regiments - 25 June 1851, plain flags with the inscription “For distinguished and zealous service” (Illus. 1335a).

2nd Caucasian, 2nd Kuban, 2nd Khoper, 2nd Volga, Mountaineer, Mozdok, and Grebensk regiments - 21 September 1831, plain flags with the inscription “For distinction in the Turkish war and for battles against the mountain tribesmen in 1828 and 1829” (Illus. 1335b).

1st and 2nd Kuban regiments - 23 July 1849, with the inscription “For constant zeal, courage, and dinstinction displayed in all affairs with the mountaineers and especially in the fight of 1 November 1848 at the Sengileevskaya settlement” (Illus. 1335c).

Kizlyar Regiment - 21 September 1831, two plain flags with the inscription “For distinction in the Turkish war and for battles against the mountaineers in 1828 and 1829, and for the taking of Andi and Dargo”. One of these flags was presented to the former Terek Family Cossack Host and the other to he Kizlyar Regiment. The two units later formed the Kizlyar Cossack Regiment.

1st Sunzha Regiment - 6 January 1850, with the inscription “For distinguished feats during the subjugation of Lesser Chechnya in 1849”.

Caucasian Cossack Foot Battalion - 2 June 1849, plain flag without an inscription.


Azov Host - 1 June 1844, plain host flag, white, with the inscription “For bravery and zeal during the crossing of the Danube by Russian troops in 1828, constant loyalty, and distinguished service” (Illus. 1336).

Danube Host, Regiments No. 1 and No. 2 - 15 September 1855, one plain flag each, without an inscription.


Orenburg Host horse regiments.

Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 - 18 November 1842, one plain flag each, without inscriptions (Illus. 1337).


Trans-Baikal Host.

Russian Horse Regiments Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4, and Buryat Horse Regiments Nos. 5 and 6 - 6 December 1852, one plain flag each, without inscriptions.

Foot battalions of the Trans-Baikal Host: Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 - 6 December 1852, one plain flag each, without inscriptions.


Caucasian Composite Irregular Regiment - 21 September 1849, plain flag with the inscription “For distinguished courage displayed in affairs with rebellious Hungarians, and for the battle at Debrecen 21 July 1849” (Illus. 1338a).

Trans-Caucasus Horse Musulman Regiment - 21 September 1849, St.-George flag with the inscription “For distinguished courage and bravery in fights against rebellious Hungarians, for the battle of 21 July 1849 at Drebecen, and for taking four guns from the enemy in this affair” (Illus. 1338b).

Georgian Foot Druzhina - 26 September 1854, plain flag with the inscription “To our Georgian druzhina for constant distinguished and zealous service in fights with the unsubdued mountaineers ” (Illus. 1339a).

Imeretian Militia - 14 April 1840, red flag with the inscription “To out Militia of our devoted Imeretian people in reward for distinguished courage displayed against the mountaineers in 1838” (Illus. 1339b).

Georgian Mass Levy - 7 March 1855, red flag with the inscription “To the Georgian Mass Levy for constant zeal, devotion, and services as displayed in actions against the mountaineers ” (Illus. 1340a).

Georgian Volunteer Horse Druzhina - 7 March 1855, raspberry St.-George flag with the inscription “To the Georgian Volunteer Horse Druzhina for its courageous actions during the defeat and pursuit of a Turkish corps beyond the river Cholok 4 June 1851” (Illus. 1340b).

Samurzakan Mass Levy - 1841, red flag with the inscription “To the mass levy of our devoted Samurzakan tribe for services performed in 1840 during the introduction of peace in Dale” (Illus. 1341a).

Inhabitants of Kabarda - 2 March 1844, red flag with the inscription “To our devoted and loyal Kabardan inhabitants for fidelity and courageous actions against unsubdued mountaineers” (Illus. 1341b).

Kazikumyk Foot Militia - 15 March 1845, red flag with the inscription “To the Kazikumyk foot militia for distinction in battles at Kyulyulya-Rugdzha and the Tilitla heights” (Illus. 1342a).

Kazikumyk Horse Militia - 15 March 1845, red flag with the inscription “To the Kazikumyk foot militia for distinction in battles at Shaurmko and Rugdzha” (Illus. 1342b).

Akhta Foot Militia - 15 March 1845, white flag with the inscription “To the Akhta foot militia for distinction in battles at Dyuvek, Margi, Dokkul-Byar, and the Tilitla heights” (Illus. 1343a).

Shirvan Horse Militia - 15 March 1845, green flag with the inscription “To the Shirvan horse militia for distinction in battles at Rugdzha and Dokkul-Byar” (Illus. 1343b).

Kuban warriors [Kubinskie voennye nukery] - 15 March 1845, yellow flag with the inscription “To the Kuban nuker warriors for distinction in the battles at Kyulyuli Dyuvek and Dokkul-Byar” (Illus. 1344a).

Kura warriors [Kurinskie voennye nukery] - 15 March 1845, dark-blue flag with the inscription “To the Kura nuker warriors for distinction in the battles at Dyuvek and Pudakar” (Illus. 1344b).

Inhabitants of Nazran - 31 July 1841, red flag with the inscription “To our devoted and loyal Nazran inhabitants, for fidelity, bravery, and zeal shown on 7 April 1841” (Illus. 1345a).

Dzhiget people - 1841, red flag with the inscription “To the Dzhiget people who in 1841 displayed to us obediance and special devotion” (Illus. 1345b).

Ossetians of the Vladikavkaz district - 15 March 1845, sky-blue flag with the inscription “To our devoted and loyal Ossetians of the Vladikavkaz district, for distinguished and zealous service, constant fidelity, and exemplary courage” (Illus. 1346).


Siberian native peoples.

Buryats of the Khora administration - 20 October 1837, seven red flags and seven sky-blue flags, without inscriptions (Illus. 1347).

Tabanguts of the Batanaevsk, Khochenutsk, and Tabayagutsk tribes - 20 October 1837, three dark-blue flags with the inscription on one of the flags “To the first Tabangut clan. of the Batanaevsk tribe”, and on a second “To the second Tabangut clan, of the Khochenutsk tribe”, and on the third “To the third Tabangut clan, of the Tabayagutsk tribe”.

Buryats of the Oginsk administration (9 clans) - 24 November 1842, nine green flags without inscriptions; Buryats of the Selenginsk administration (15 clans) - 15 August 1845, fifteen of the same flags (Illus. 1348).

LXXXIII. Order ribbons and metal bands for flags and standards.
[Ordenskie lenty i skoby k znamenam i shtandartam.]

25 June 1838 - A HIGHEST Order to the Minister of War laid out:

Wishing to preserve in our victorious army the unforgettable memory of its founder and in each regiment to transmit to the latest descendents its worthy deeds so as to inspire in the most recent generations of brave Russian troops the desire to emulate such glorious battlefield services, we establish three additional special signs of distinction for flags and standards. These distinctions are bestowed according to the following rules:

1. In those regiments and separate units which in one hundred or more years from the time they were first formed have never been disbanded, though they may have changed their name, the infantry on their flags, and the cavalry on their standards, are to have special fringed order ribbons according to the confirmed pattern.

2. These ribbons are to be: in the Guards—St. Andrew’s, and in the Army and Garrisons—Alexander ribbon.

3. There is to be silver or gold embroidered inscriptions on the ribbons, according to the color of the regiment’s buttons: on the front - the year of the regiment’s founding and first naming; on the back, for troops having flags and standards with the various inscriptions for distinction or deeds of valor—the year these distinctions were granted.

4. At the end of the ribbon over the fringe are to be stamped metal images: under the year of the regiment’s founding—the monogram of the founder; under the year distinctions were granted to the flag or standard—the monogram of the sovereign who granted this distinction. On the opposite end of the reverse side—a two-headed Russian eagle.

5. At the top on a bow, where the ribbon folds over, there is to be a specially embroidered inscription of the year the ribbon was bestowed.

6. Ribbons are to be tied to flags and standards at the upper part of the pole under the eagle or spearhead by a special cord passed through a ring at where the ribbon folds over under the bow.

7. These distinctions are to be considered part of the flag or standard, but used only during regimental holidays, consecrations with holy water, HIGHEST reviews, ceremonial guard mounts for personages of the Imperial family, crowned heads, general-field marshals, and their own honorary colonels, as well as during inspector reviews.

8. Outside these occasions, these ribbons are to be kept in regimental strong boxes under the key and seal of the regimental commander.

9. All regiments and units possessing flags or standards, but not having had 100 years of existence yet, are to have on the pole a gilded bronze round band [skoba], slipped on from below over the butt and tightly fastened under the cloth flag or standard.

10. On this metal band is to be: the name of the regiment’s founder, the year of founding, the regiment’s first name, the distinctions given to the regiment as inscriptions on the flag or standard, the year this distinction was granted, and the name of the regiment and battalion—or double-squadron in the cavalry—to which the flag or standard belongs.

11. These bands are to be for those troops to whom are granted the ribbons established by this order.

When calculating the time since regiments were founded, those regiments that were formed from several units are to count their seniority according to the oldest unit that became part of the regiment, if this unit is no smaller than a half-battalion or two squadrons. However, if a regiment was organized from other regiments through units of a smaller size, then the seniority or formation of the regiment is to be counted from the date it was ordered to be formed.

This order is also effective for flags belonging to cadet corps. They are prescribed St.-Andrew ribbons as in the Guards. The length of the ribbon established by this order is the same for flags and standards—1 arshin [28 inches], starting from the fold at the top of the pole (Illus. 1349). The width is the same as for the ribbons of the senior grades of knightly orders. Along the ribbon’s edges, and across it to separate monograms and eagles from inscriptions, is to be embroidered a gold or silver line, according to the color of the uniform buttons. The cord with which the ribbon is tied to the pole is flat and silver with a mix of black and orange silk (Illus. 1349).

The height of a gilt band fastened by small gilded nails to the pole under the cloth of the flag or standard is 1-1/2 vershoks [2-5/8 inches].

The pattern refered to in the first paragraph and used for all ribbons is the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii’s ribbon, of the sky-blue color particular to the order of St. Andrew the First-Called, and with the followin gold images and inscriptions (Illus. 1349).

On the 1st side—a metallic monogram of Emperor Peter I under an imperial crown, with the embroidered inscription “1683. The Preobrazhenskii Playthings”, which signified the year the unit that later became the L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii Regiment was founded, and the title of that unit.

On the 2nd and 3rd sides—the metallic monogram of Emperor Alexander I, who presented the L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii Regiment with their present flags with their distinctive inscription; the embroidered year the flags were presented—“1813”, and the inscription itself that is on the flags—“For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812”. At the bottom edge of the 3rd side is a gilded metal image of the two-headed eagle of the Russian imperial coat-of-arms.

On the 4th side—the embroidered inscription “L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii Regiment”, i.e. the title of the regiment to which the flag belongs.

On the bow that covers the folding over of the ribbon is the embroidered inscription “1838”, signifying the year the ribbon was granted.

On the metal band are inscribed: the monogram of Emperor Peter I, as founder of the L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii Regiment, and the inscriptions from all four sides of the ribbon with the addition of the year the ribbon was granted and the number of the battalion to which the flag belongs. For example, in the 1st Battalion after Emperor Peter I’s monogram is: “1683. The Preobrazhenskii Playthings - 1813. For distinction in the defeat and expulsion of the enemy from Russian territory in 1812 - 1838. L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii Regiment 1st Battalion” (Illus. 1349).

The monograms of sovereigns during whose reigns regiments and other troop units were founded, as well as sovereigns who presented flags with inscriptions to these regiments and units for military distinction, are confirmed in the following styles.

Tsar Michael Feodorovich—of the Old Church Slavonic letters M. F. under the crown of Grand Duke Vladimir Monomach (Illus. 1350a).
Tsar Aleksei Mikhailovich—of the Old Church Slavonic letters A. M. under the same crown (Illus. 1350b).
Emperor Peter I—of Latin letters under an imperial crown (Illus. 1350c).
Empress Catherine I (Illus. 1350d).
Empress Anna Ioannovna (Illus. 1350e).
Empress Elisabeth Petrovna (Illus. 1350f).
Empress Catherine II (Illus. 1350g).
Emperor Paul I (Illus. 1350h).
Emperor Alexander I (Illus. 1350i).
Emperor Nicholas I (Illus. 1350k).

All monograms beginning with that of Emperor Peter I are adopted for ribbons and bands in the style in which they appeared on contemporary flags and standards during each reign. (There were no personal monograms of Emperor Peter II or Emperor Peter III on flags or standards because any regiments or other units founded during their reigns no longer exist.)

LXXXIV. Orders and medals.
[Ordena i medali.]

(This information is taken from Order charters and HIGHEST Orders.)

22 August 1822 - A distinctive insignia is established to mark irreproachable service, based on the fact that constant zeal and faultless service over a significant period of time does not have its own authorized distinction other than orders for military officers after 25 years and for civil officials after 35.

This insignia is silver or gilt, and has the form of a rectangular frame buckle on which is depicted a oakleaf wreath; in the center of the wreath in Roman numerals are the number of years of service for which the badge is given, i.e. beginning with 15 years of active service, followed by 20, 25, 30, and so on, for every five years. This mark of distinction for irreproachable service is given to military personnel on a St.-George ribbon, and to civil officials on a St.-Vladimir ribbon (Illus. 1351a and 1351b).

15 March 1828 - All troops who took part in the fighting against the Persians in 1826, 1827, and 1828 are ordered to wear a silver medal on a combined St.-George and St.-Vladimir ribbon. On the front of the medal is an eye, and beneath it 1826, 1827, and 1828 in a laurel wreath; on the back is the inscription “For the Persian War” (Illus. 1351c).

6 July 1828 - It is ordered that person awarded the order of St. Anne 3rd class for military actions are to be distinguished from those who received this order for other services by the addition to the order of a bow of the ribbon prescribed for the order.

April 1828 - A statute for the order of St. Anne is confirmed and at the same time it is established that commanders may not put forward recommendations for this order only after the recipient has served in commissioned officer ranks at least 15 years. The statute explains all the rights and privileges of this order, as well as the rules on whose basis various persons may be put forward to be awarded this order.

1 October 1829 - All persons who took part in military operations against the Turks in 1828 and 1829 are ordered to wear a silver medal on a St.-George ribbon. On the front of the medal is a cross with two arms and rays of light, standing on a halfmoon with the inscription “1828 and 1829” along the cross’s sides; on the reverse is the inscription“For the Turkish War” within a laurel wreath (Illus. 1351d).

17 November 1831 - It is ordered to join to the orders of the Russian empire the tsarist Polish orders of the White Eagle and St. Stanislav, with the designation of these orders as imperial and tsarist [imperatorskie i tsarskie].

13 December 1831 - It is ordered that knights of the order of the apostle St. Andrew the First-Called, as the most senior order, be also be honored as knights of the order of the White Eagle, with the bestowal of this right to those who in the future may be given the order of St. Andrew in the future, after the date the order of the White Eagle was joined to the system of Russian orders.

31 December 1831 - All persons who took part in military operations in the Kingdom of Poland are ordered to wear the badge of distinction for military merit [znak otlichie za voennye dostoinstva, i.e. Virtuti Militari - M.C.] that belonged to this kingdom (Illus. 1352a). Those present at the storming of Warsaw are to additionally have a silver medal on whose front is a two-headed eagle over the inscription “Worth, honor, and glory”, and on the back—a radiant cross over a laurel wreath around the inscription “For the taking of Warsaw by storm 25 and 26 August 1831”(Illus. 1352b). The ribbon for the badge of distinction and medal is to be of dark-blue and black stripes.

25 January 1832 - It is ordered to make ribbons for the order of the White Eagle in dark blue instead of sky blue (Illus. 1353).

6 December 1833 - A new statute is confirmed for the Military Order, in which all previous regulations are joined with certain changes connectd to the order’s increased status.

4 February 1835 - It is ordered that persons who received the badge for irreproachable service are, in the case of their transfer from military to civilian service and back again, to afterwards be given the badge on the ribbon prescribed for their most recent branch of service.

17 March 1835 - It is ordered that persons holding the orders of the White Eagle and St. Stanislav 1st class are not to wear either the stars nor the ribbons of these orders with the order of St. Alexander Nevsky (for the first) and with the order of St. Anne 1st class (for the second); to designate the knightly rank of “small cross”, with a more senior award they are to wear its cross on the ribbon prescribed for the order.

30 July 1835 - It is ordered that the Knightly council consist henceforth of the following numbers of knights: Military order—all 1st and 2nd-class knights present and the 12 senior 3rd and 4th-class knights; St. Vladimir and St. Anne orders—the 12 senior knights of each of these orders’ four classes.

10 March 1837 - A new regulation is confirmed for the badge of distinction for irreproachable service.

28 May 1839 - As statute is confirmed for the order of St. Stanislav, by which only three classes are established instead of the previous four (Illus. 1354).

5 September 1839 - All persons who took part in the taking of fortified Akhulgo by storm are ordered to wear a silver medal on St.-George ribbon. On the front of the medal is the Cyrillic monogram N. I, and on the reverse—the inscription “For the taking of Akhulgo by storm 22 August 1839” (Illus. 1355a).

4 January 1843 - The following manner for wearing orders is established: knights of the order of the apostle St. Andrew the First-Called who wear the cross of the order of St. Alexander Nevsky at the neck on a narrow ribbon are not to wear the insignia of the order of the White Eagle; knights of the order of St. Alexander Nevsky who have the order of the White Eagle and St. Anne 1st class are to wear on the neck only the White Eagle; knights of the order of the White Eagle are to wear at the neck only the order of St. Anne; knights of the order of St. Anne who have the order of St. Stanislav 1st class are to wear it at the neck.

9 August 1844 - It is ordered that all order insignia awarded to Muslims replace images of saints with an image of the imperial eagle.

29 August 1844 - A supplementary order was issued that St.-George medals awarded to Muslim lower ranks also have the image of an imperial eagle.

22 July 1845 - New statutes are confirmed for the orders of St. Vladimir and St. Anne, along with new guidance for wearing orders. Knights of the order of the apostle St. Andrew the First-Called are to wear the order of St. Alexander Nevsky at the neck, but that of the order of the White Eagle—in a buttonhole; knights of the order of St. Alexander Nevsky are to wear the order of the White Eagle at the neck, and that of St. Anne 1st class—in a buttonhole; knights of the order of the White Eagle are to wear the order of St. Anne 1st class at the neck, and that of St. Stanislav 1st class—in a buttonhole; knights of the order of St. Anne 1st class are to wear the order of St. Stanislav 1st class at the neck.

8 January 1846 - It is ordered that henceforth on awarded medals the visage of His Imperial Majesty will be with a moustache.

26 February 1846 - It is ordered that order insignia of the first classes which are determined must be worn in a buttonhole, are to be arranged not in order of class, but by seniority of the orders, and they are to be of the same size as the insignia of those classes prescribed for wear in buttonholes.

27 October 1846 - On the stars of all orders awarded to non-Christians, the images of saints are to be replaced by monograms, and instead of crosses there is to be an imperial eagle.

22 January 1850 - All persons who took part in the Hungarian war are ordered to have a silver medal on a combined St. Andrew and St. Vladimir ribbon. On the front of the medal is a two-headed eagle under an all-seeing eye, and around this is the inscription “God is with us, let it be known and submit”, and on the reverse—the inscription “For the pacification of Hungary and Transylvania 1849” (Illus. 1355b).

4 January 1851 - Based on statute, all St.-George knights are ordered to also wear the insignia of this order on frock coats.

15 July 1854 - It is ordered that all knights of the higher classes of orders be issued stamped metal stars instead of the previous embroidered ones.

2 February 1855 - St.-George knights who received the order for 25 years of service or 18 campaigns, and who afterwards perform distinguished deeds which confer the right to be awarded the order in 4th class, are ordered to add a bow to the ribbon of the cross they already hold. Along with this it is ordered: 1. Knights awarded the bow are to be titled knights of the military order of St. George 4th class for 25 years service or 18 campaigns with bow; 2. Knights holding the order of St. George 4th class for military deeds are not to be put forward for award of the order for service years or for completing the regulation number of campaigns.

******************

NOTES.

(1) Collection of Laws and Directives relating to the Military Administration [Sobranie zakonov i postanovlenii, do chasti voennago upravleniya otnosyashchikhsya], Book I, pg. 3.
(2) Ibid. 1829, Book III, pg. 127.
(3) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there.
(4) Collection of Laws and Directives relating to the Military Administration, 1831, Book II, pg. 33.
(5) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there.
(6) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1836, Book III, pg. 219.
(7) Order of the Minister of War, 1843, No. 44.
(8) Memorandum of the Minister of War to the Commander-in-Chief of the Separate Caucasus Corps, 2 October 1843, No. 1066.
(9) Confirmed patterns preserved in the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and Sixth continuation of the Code of Military Directives [Svod Voennykh Postanovlenii], 1846, pg. 100, §§ 175-178 .
(10) Memorandum of the Minister of War to the Commander-in-Chief of the Separate Caucasus Corps, 19 March 1847, No. 1181.
(11) Ditto., 8 March 1849, No. 1090.
(12) Memorandum of the Minister of War to H.I.H. the Commander-in-Chief of the Guards and Grenadier Corps, 7 May 1849, No. 2087.
(13) Order of the Minister of War, 1851, No. 15.
(14) Ditto, 1852, No. 6.
(15) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, Book I, pg. 3.
(16) Ibid., 1829, Book III, pg. 27.
(17) Ibid., 1831, Book II, pg. 33.
(18) Sixth continuation of the Code of Military Directives, 1846, pg. 105, §§ 178-180.
(19) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, Book I, pg. 3.
(20) Ibid., Book III, pg. 17, and Report of the Host Ataman Colonel Petrov to the Duty General of HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’s Main Headquarters, 21 September 1827, No. 281.
(21) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(22) Ditto.
(23) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1831, Book II, pg. 33.
(24) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there.
(25) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(26) Ibid, Book IV, pg. 325.
(27) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pgs. 418-422.
(28) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(29) Ditto, No. 69, pg 24.
(30) Sixth continuation of the Code of Military Directives, 1846, pgs. 53 and 54, §§ 94-99.
(31) Order of the Minister of War, 1845, No. 66.
(32) Ditto, 1845, No. 72.
(33) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, Book I, pg. 3.
(34) Ibid., 1829, Book III, pg. 127.
(35) Confirmed patterns preserved in the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(36) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(37) Ibid., Book IV, pg. 325.
(38) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pg. 418, and information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(39) Collection of Laws and Directives, Book II, pg. 283.
(40) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(41) Sixth continuation of the Code of Military Directives, 1846, pgs. 53, 55, and 56; §§ 94-99.
(42) Order of the Minister of War, 1845, No. 72.
(43) Ditto, 1852, No. 75.
(44) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, Book I, pg. 3
(45) Ibid., 1829, Book III, pg. 127.
(46) Confirmed patterns preserved in the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(47) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1831, Book II, pg. 33.
(48) Ibid., 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(49) Ibid., Book IV, pg. 325.
(50) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pgs. 418-422.
(51) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(52) Ditto., No. 69, pg. 26.
(53) Ditto., 1845, No. 66.
(54) Ditto., No. 72.
(55) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1826, Book III, pg. 29.
(56) Ibid., 1827, Book I, pg. 3
(57) [No note cited]
(58) Ibid., 1829, Book III. pg. 127.
(59) Ibid., 1837, Book III, pg. 3.
(60) Ibid., pg. 47.
(61) Ibid., Book IV, pg. 325.
(62) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pgs. 413-422.
(63) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(64) Ditto, 1844, No. 69, pg. 12.
(65) Ditto, 1845, No. 66.
(66) Ditto, 1845, No. 72.
(67) Memorandum of the Minister of War to His Imperial Highness the Commander-in-Chief of the Guards and Grenadier Corps, 27 February 1847, No. 1728.
(68) Order of the Minister or War, 1848, No. 16.
(69) Ditto, 1848, No. 27.
(70) Ditto, 1851, No. 6.
(71) Ditto, 1852, No. 49.
(72) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, No. 1, pg. 3.
(73) Ibid., 1829, Book III. pg. 127.
(74) Confirmed patterns preserved in the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(75) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1831, Book II, pg. 33.
(76) Ibid., 1834, Book I, pg. 549.
(77) HIGHEST confirmed Regulation for the First Orenburg Cossack Regiment, 21 March 1835, pgs. 23 and 24.
(78) Ibid., 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(79) Ibid., Book IV., 325.
(78) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(79) Ditto, 1837, Book IV, pg. 325.
(80) Ditto, 1838, Book II, pgs. 418-422, and Second continuation of the Code of Military Directives, 1841, pg. 579, § 197.
(81) Second continuation of the Code of Military Directives, 1841, pg. 56, § 30, pg. 79, § 197.
(82) Order of the head of the War Ministry, 13 April 1842, No. 32.
(83) Memorandum of the Minister of War to the Commander of the Separate Orenburg Corps, 12 October 1843, No. 1216.
(84) Ditto, 20 October 1843, No. 1331.
(85) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(86) Memorandum of the Minister of War to the Commander of the Separate Orenburg Corps, 7 January 1844, No. 87.
(87) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 69, pg. 26.
(88) Ditto, 1845, No. 66.
(89) Ditto, 1845, No. 72.
(90) Memorandum of the Minister of War to the Commander of the Separate Orenburg Corps, 26 October 1854, No. 1825.
(91) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, Book I, pg. 3.
(92) Ibid., 1829, Book III, pg. 127.
(93) Confirmed patterns preserved in the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(94) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(95) Ibid., 1837, Book IV, pg. 325.
(96) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pgs. 418-422.
(97) Ibid., 1839, Book III, pg. 5.
(98) Order of the Minister of War, 1845, No. 72, and Third continuation of the Code of Military Directives, 1843, pg. 254, § 5, and pgs. 260 and 261.
(99) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(100) Ditto, 1845, No. 66.
(101) Ditto, 1845, No. 72.
(102) Memorandum of the Minister of War to the Commander of the Separate Orenburg Corps, 5 April 1849, No. 1484.
(103) Order of the Minister of War, 1852, No. 75.
(104) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, Book I, pg. 3.
(105) Ibid., 1827, Book III, pg. 17.
(106) Ibid., 1831, Book II, pg. 139; information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there.
(107) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, Book I, pg. 3.
(108) Ibid., 1827, Book III, pg. 17.
(109) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there
(110) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1832, Book I, pg. 13.
(111) Ibid., 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(112) Ibid., 1837, Book IV, pg. 325.
(113) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pg. 418-422.
(114) Confirmed patterns preserved in the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and a description of confirmed patterns forwarded to the commander of the Separate Orenburg Corps with correspondence from the Duty General of HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’s Main Headquarters, 2 October 1829, No. 7466.
(115) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(116) Ibid., 1837, Book IV, pg. 325.
(117) Information received from the Department of Military Settlements, 8 November 1854, No. 1908, and information received from the acting commander of the Separate Orenburg Corps, 11 March 1848, No. 434.
(118) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(119) Ditto, 1844, No. 69.
(120) Ditto, 1845, No. 72, and information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(121) Memorandum of the Minister of War to the commander of the Separate Orenburg Corps, 12 February 1846, No. 682.
(122) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, Book I, pg. 3.
(123) Ibid., 1829, Book III, pg. 127, and information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(124) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(125) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1831, Book II, pg. 33.
(126) Ibid., 1837, Book I, pg. 61.
(127) Ibid., 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(128) Ibid., 1837, Book IV, pg. 325.
(129) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pg. 422.
(130) Memorandum of the director of the Department of Military Settlements to the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, 4 December 1840, No. 3428.
(131) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(132) Ditto, 1844, No. 69, pg. 26.
(133) Ditto, 1845, No. 66.
(134) Ditto, 1845, No. 72.
(135) Administrative Regulation for the Siberian Line Cossack Host, confirmed 5 December 1846.
(136) Order of the Minister of War, 1851, No. 46.
(137) Ditto, 1851, No. 127.
(138) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1827, Book I, pg. 3.
(139) Ibid., 1829, Book III, pg. 127.
(140) Confirmed patterns preserved in the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(141) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(142) Ibid., 1837, Book IV, pg. 325.
(143) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pg. pgs. 418-422.
(144) Ibid., 1839, Book III, pg. 5.
(145) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(146) Ditto, 1845, No. 66.
(147) Ditto, 1845, No. 72.
(148) Administrative Regulation [Polozhenie] for the Siberian Line Cossack Host, confirmed 5 December 1846.
(149) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there.
(150) [No note cited.]
(151) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book IV, pg. 325.
(152) Memorandum of the director of the Department of Military Settlements to the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, 22 August 1840, No. 2442.
(153) Memorandum of the director of the Department of Military Settlements to the governor-general of Eastern Siberia, 18 February 1842, No. 512.
(154) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(155) Administrative Regulation for the Tobolsk Cossack Foot Battalion and Tobolsk Horse Regiment, confirmed 21 October 1849.
(156) Memorandum of the Minister of War to the governor-general of Eastern Siberia and commander of troops stationed there, 31 January 1851, No. 277, and Administrative Regulation for the Irkutsk and Yeniseisk Cossack Regiments, confirmed 4 January 1851.
(157) Administrative Regulation for the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host, confirmed 17 March 1851
(158) Administrative Regulation for foot battalions of the Trans-Baikal Cossack Host, confirmed 21 June [sic - M.C.] 1851.
(159) Order of the Minister of War, 1852, No. 31.
(160) Ditto, 1853, No. 60.
(161) Ditto, 1854, No. 3.
(162) Ditto, 1854, No. 35.
(163) Complete Collection of the Laws of the Russian Empire, second collection, Vol. VI, sect. 1, No. 4536, pgs. 339, § 14, pg. 340, §§ 18, 20, and 21
(164) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(165) Order of the Minister of War, 1838, Book II, pgs. 418-422, and confirmed patterns preserved at the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(166) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(167) Ditto, 1844, No. 69, pg. 26.
(168) Fifth continuation of the Code of Military Directives, 1845, pgs. 108, 111, and 144-148.
(169) Order of the Minister of War, 1845, No. 66.
(170) Ditto, 1845, No. 72.
(171) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there.
(172) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book IV, pg. 325.
(173) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pg. 422.
(174) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there.
(175) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(176) Ditto, 1844, No. 69, pg. 26.
(177) Ditto, 1845, No. 66.
(178) Ditto, 1845, No. 72.
(179) Ditto, 1851, No. 98.
(180) Ditto, 1852, No. 3.
(181) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there.
(182) Ditto.
(183) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1830, Book III, pg. 215.
(184) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department.
(185) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book III, pg. 3.
(186) Ibid., pg. 47.
(187) Ibid., Book IV, pg. 235.
(188) Ibid., 1838, Book II, pgs. 413-422.
(189) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(190) Ditto, No. 69., pg. 26.
(191) Ditto, 1845, No. 66.
(192) Ditto, No. 72.
(193) Ditto, 1848, No. 16.
(194) Ditto, 1851, No. 6.
(195) Information received from the War Department’s Commissariat Department, and confirmed patterns preserved there; information received from the Department of Military Settlements, 8 November 1854, No. 1908.
(196) Collection of Laws and Directives, 1837, Book III, pg. 47.
(197) Ibid., Book IV, pg. 325.
(198) Order of the Minister of War, 1844, No. 1.
(199) Ditto, 1854, No. 134, and HIGHEST confirmed description of patterns, 16 January 1855.
(200) Administrative Regulation for the Government Mobile Mass Levy [Opolchenie], confirmed by HIGHEST Authority 29 January 1855.


END OF VOLUME THIRTY

and of the

HISTORICIAL DESCRIPTION OF THE CLOTHING AND ARMS OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY

[End of translation.]