HISTORICAL DESCRIPTION

OF THE CLOTHING AND

ARMS OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY



A.V. VISKOVATOV



Compiled by Highest direction

Saint Petersburg, Military Typography Office, 1851



[TRANSLATED BY MARK CONRAD, 2010]

--------------------------------------------

VOLUME 15

Guards Cavalry.

1801-1825





Changes in the uniforms and equipment of Guards Cavalry from 1801 to 1825.

XXXIII.

Guards Cuirassiers

XXXIV.

Guards Dragoons

XXXV.

Guards Horse-Jägers

XXXVI.

Guards Hussars

XXXVII.

Guards Lancers

XXXVIII.

Guards Cossacks

XXXIX.

Guards Gendarmes

XL.

Guards Train



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

1987. Privates. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1801-1803.

1988. Non-Commissioned Officer. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1802-1803.

1989. Company-Grade Officer. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1802-1803.

1990. Officer’s cartridge pouch, Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1801-1803.

1991. Private. L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, 1802-1803.

1992. Trumpeter and Staff-Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, 1802-1803.

1993. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, 1802-1803.

1994. General. L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, 1802-1803.

1995. Kettledrum banner, L.-Gds. Horse Regimenta, 1802-1825.

1996. Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, 1802-1804.

1997. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, 1802-1807.

1998. Private. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1803.

1999. Staff-Trumpeter and Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, 1803-1806.

2000. Stars for helmets in the Guards Cavalry, since 1803. a. Lower ranks. b. Officers.

2001. General. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1803-1806.

2002. Company-Grade Officers. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1804-1806.

2003. Private. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1804-1806.

2004. Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, 1804-1806.

2005. Company-Grade Officer. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1804-1807.

2006. General. L.-Gds Horse Regiment, 1804-1806.

2007. Company-Grade Officer. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1807-1809.

2008. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds Horse Regiment, 1807-1809.

2009. Private of the Cavalier Guards Regiment and Trumpeter of the L.-Gds Horse Regiment, 1808-1809.

2010. Field-Grade Officers. Cavalier Guards Regiment and L.-Gds Horse Regiment, 1808-1809.

2011. Field-Grade Officers. Cavalier Guards Regiment and L.-Gds Horse Regiment, 1809-1811.

2012. Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds Horse Regiment, 1809-1811.

2013. Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds Horse Regiment, 1812-1814.

2014. Private. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1812-1820.

2015. Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, 1812-1820.

2016. Private. L.-Gds. Cuirassier Regiment, 1813-1814. Note. The white insert between the rows of tape on shabracks and pistol carriers was later replaced by blue.

2017. Officers shabracks and pistol carriers of the L.-Gds. Cuirassiers since 1813. Note. The white insert between the galloon was later replaced by blue.

2018. Field-Grade Officer and Trumpeter. L.-Gd. Cuirassier Regiment, 1813-1814.

2019. Company-Grade Officers. Cavalier Guards Regiment, L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, and L.-Gds. Cuirassier Regiment, 1814-1825.

2020. Company-Grade Officers. Cavalier Guards Regiment, L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, and L.-Gds. Cuirassier Regiment, 1814-1820.

2021. Non-Commissioned Officers., L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, and L.-Gds. Cuirassier Regiment, 1814-1820.

2022. Field-Grade Officer and Private. L.-Gds. Cuirassier Regiment, 1814-1820.

2023. General. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1815-1825.

2024. Trumpeters. Cavalier Guards Regiment, L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, and L.-Gds. Cuirassier Regiment, 1817-1820

2025. Private. L.-Gds. Podolia Cuirassier Regiment, 1818-1820. Note. The yellow tape along the dark-blue insert on shabracks and pistol carriers was later replaced by white.

2026. Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Podolia Cuirassier Regiment, 1818-1820.

2027. Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Podolia Cuirassier Regiment, 1818-1820.

2028. Embroidery on officers’ coats in the L.-Gds. Podolia Cuirassier Regiment, since 1818.

2029. Non-Commissioned Officer. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1818-1820.

2030. Trumpeters. L.-Gds. Cuirassier Regiment and L.-Gds. Podolia Cuirassier Regiment, 1820-1825.

2031. Cavalier Guardsman, 1822-1825.

2032. Private. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1809-1811.

2033. Non-Commissioned Officer and Staff-Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1809-1811.

2034. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1809-1811.

2035. Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1809-1811.

2036. Private. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1812-1817.

2037. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1812-1817.

2038. Non-Commissioned Officer and Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1817-1819.

2039. Private. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1817-1819.

2040. Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1817-1820.

2041-42. Staff-Trumpeter and Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1823-1825.

2043. Private and Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 1825.

2044. Private. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1814-1816.

2045. Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1814-1816.

2046. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1814-1816.

2047a. Embroidery on officers’ coats in the L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, since 1816.

2047b. Field-Grade Officer and Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1816-1819.

2048. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1817-1819.

2049. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1817-1819.

2050. Trumpeter and Private. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1817-1819.

2051. Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1820-1825.

2052. Field-Grade Officer and Private. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1823-1825.

2053. Non-Commissioned Officer and Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, 1825.

2054. Private. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1801-1802.

2055. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1801-1802.

2056. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1801-1802. (In full parade uniform.)

2057. Privates. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1801-1809.

2058. Saddlecloth and Sabertache for lower ranks in the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, since 1802.

2059. Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1802-1807.

2060. Staff-Trumpeter and Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1802-1807.

2061. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1802-1809.

2062. Officer’s sabertache, L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, established in 1802.

2063. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1802-1804.

2064. Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1807-1809.

2065. Private. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1809-1810.

2066. Lace figure [tsyfrovka] on the chakchiry pants of lower ranks in the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, established in 1809.

2067. Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1809-1810.

2068. Decoration and lace figure on Officers’ chakchiry pants in the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1809-1816.

2069. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1809.

2070. Private and Staff-Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1810-1811.

2071. Private and Staff-Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1812-1816.

2072. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1812-1816.

2073. Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1814-1818.

2074. Private. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1816-1819.

2075. Lace figure on the chakchiry pants of lower ranks in the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, established in 1816.

2076. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1816-1819.

2077. Decoration and lace figure on Officers’ chakchiry pants in the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, established in1816.

2078. Private and Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1817-1819.

2079. Embroidery on undress coat, L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, since 1818.

2080. Private and Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1819-1820.

2081. Company-Grade Officer and Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1823-1825.

2082. Private. L.-Gds Hussar Regiment, 1824-1825.

2083. Shako for lower ranks of the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1824-1825.

2084. Shako for lower ranks of the L.-Gds. Grodno Hussar Regiment, 1824-1825. Note. This shako was prescribed for use, but was never used in the regiment.

2085. Saddle cloths for lower ranks of the L.-Gds. Grodno Hussar Regiment, 1824-1825. a. Prescribed for use. b. Actually used.

2086. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Grodno Hussar Regiment, 1824-1825.

2087. Officers’ shakos of the L.-Gds. Grodno Hussar Regiment, 1824-1825. a.a. Prescribed for Company-Grade Officers, but was not used. b.b. Prescribed for Field-Grade Officers, but was not used. c.c. Actually used by Field and Company-Grade Officers.

2088. Officer’s saddle cloth and sabertache of the L.-Gds. Grodno Hussar Regiment, 1824-1825.

2089. Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Grodno Hussar Regiment, 1824-1825.

2090. Non-Commissioned Officer and Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 1825.

2091. Privates. L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, 1809-1811.

2092. Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, 1809-1811.

2093. Trumpeter and Staff-Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, 1809-1811.

2094. Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, 1809-1811.

2095. Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, 1807-1811.

2096. Staff-Trumpeter and Private. L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, 1812-1814.

2097. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, 1814-1818.

2098. Non-Commissioned Officer and Private. L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, 1814-1825.

2099. Trumpeter. L-Gds. Lancer Regiment, 1817-1818.

2100. Privates. Tsarevich Constantine Pavlovich’s L.-Gds Lancer Regiment, 1818-1822.

2101. Non-Commissioned Officers. Tsarevich Constantine Pavlovich’s L.-Gds Lancer Regiment, 1818-1822.

2102. Staff-Trumpeter and Trumpeter. Tsarevich Constantine Pavlovich’s L.-Gds Lancer Regiment, 1818-1822.

2103. Field-Grade Officers. Tsarevich Constantine Pavlovich’s L.-Gds Lancer Regiment, 1818-1822.

2104. Private and Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds Lancer Regiment, 1818-1819.

2105. Field and Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds Lancer Regiment, 1818-1819.

2106. Non-Commissioned Officer and Company-Grade Officer. Tsarevich Constantine Pavlovich’s L.-Gds Lancer Regiment, 1819-1822.

2107. Trumpeters. Tsarevich Constantine Pavlovich’s L.-Gds Lancer Regiment, 1825.

2108. Field-Grade Officers. Tsarevich Constantine Pavlovich’s L.-Gds Lancer Regiment, 1825.

2109. Private and Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment, 1801-1809.

2110. Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1801-1809.

2111. Officer’s cartridge pouch for the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment, 1801-1808.

2112. Privates. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1809-1812.

2113. Non-Commissioned Officers. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1809-1812.

2114. Trumpeters. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1809-1812.

2115. Company-Grade Officer and Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1809-1812.

2116. Officer’s cartridge pouch for the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment, instituted in 1809.

2117. General. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1809-1812.

2118. Private and Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1812-1814.

2119. Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1812-1815.

2120. Privates. L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, 1815-1816.

2121. Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, 1813-1816.

2122. Privates. L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, 1816-1824. Note. From 1817 gloves were without gauntlet cuffs.

2123. Trumpeter. L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, 1816-1819.

2124. Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment and L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, 1816-1819.

2125. Non-Commissioned Officer and Private. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1816-1824.

2126. Non-Commissioned Officer of the L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, and Company-Grade Officer of the L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, 1819-1825.

2127. Trumpeters. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment and L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, 1820-1825.

2128. Private and Non-Commissioned Officer. L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, 1825.

2129. Field-Grade Officer. L.-Gds Cossack Regiment, 1825.

2130. Non-Commissioned Officer and Private. L.-Gds. Gendarme Half-Squadron, 1815-1816.

2131. Company-Grade Officers. L.-Gds Gendarme Half-Squadron, 1815-1816.

2132. Embroidery on Officers’ coats in the L.-Gds. Gendarme Half-Squadron, established in 1815.

2133. Trumpeter and Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds Gendarme Half-Squadron, 1816-1817.

2134. Company-Grade Officer. L.-Gds Gendarme Half-Squadron, 1817-1825.

2135. Trumpeter. L.-Gds Gendarme Half-Squadron, 1820-1825.

2136. Private and Non-Commissioned Officer. Guards Train Brigade, 1817-1825.

2137. Company-Grade Officer. Guards Train Brigade, 1817-1825.






XXXIII. GUARDS CUIRASSIERS.
[Gvardeiskie kirasiry.]


9 April 1801 - Lower ranks of the Cavalier Guards and L.-Gds. Horse Regiments were ordered to cut off their curls [pukli] and have queues [kosy] only 4 vershoks [7 inches] long, tying them midway down the collar (1).

17 July 1801 – Cavalier Guards non-commissioned officers were ordered to have pouches [lyadunki] to hold pistol cartridges instead of—as was the previous practice—having nest-like spaces [gnezdy] in the holsters. (2).

21 July 1801 – Generals and field and company-grade officers of the Cavalier Guards and L.-Gds. Horse Regiments were given hats of a new pattern, completely identical to those introduced in 1802 in Army Cuirassier regiments, and already described above (3).

9 August 1801 - The cuirasses [kirasy] in both regiments were withdrawn (4).

27 February 1802 — Officers of both regiments were ordered to have short gloves without gauntlets, of the pattern used at this time by infantry officers (5).

17 March 1802 — The regulations confirmed on this date regarding the cut, trim, and pattern of cuirassier uniforms, for combatant as well as for noncombatant ranks, were also adopted for the Cavalier Guards and L.-Gds. Horse Regiments. Based on these and on special models confirmed by HIGHEST Authority, private Cavalier Guardsmen had the following clothing, accouterments, weapons, and horse furniture:

Coat [kolet] – single breasted, of white cloth, with two cloth shoulder straps; standing collar, slit cuffs, piping at the shoulder seams of the sleeves and on the shoulder straps and skirt turnbacks—of crimson cloth; cloth piping, also crimson, along both sides of the coat’s front opening, on which was sewn silver galloon; two silver galloon buttonhole loops on the cuffs; white cloth lining and piping along the upper and side edges of the collar; tinned brass buttons of which one was prescribed to be on each shoulder strap, one at the bottom of each skirt, and two at the waist; the coat’s front opening was closed with small hooks (Illus. 1987).

Hat [shlyapa] – with swhite worsted buttonhole loop, similar to the silver loop for officers, and with small red tassels (Illus. 1987).

Girdle [kushak] – of crimson serge (Illus. 1987).

Sabertache [tashka] – of crimson cloth, with toothed silver galloon at the edges; silver embroidered star in the center, of the same form as on Guards officers’ shabracks, and with red Russian leather straps (Illus. 1987).

Broadsword [palash] – of the previous pattern as used under EMPEROR PAUL I, i.e. with a silvered hilt with a two-headed eagle, and a black leather scabbard with a slit iron frame (Illus. 1987).

Swordknot and sword belt [temlyak i portupeya] – of red Russian leather (Illus. 1987).

Crossbelt (for the carbine) and pouch belt [pogonnaya (k karabinu) i lyadunochnaya perevyazi] – white (deerskin), trimmed at the edges with narrow silver galloon with crimson cloth piping, and worn crosswise over each other (Illus. 1987).

Pouch [lyadunka] – of black leather, of the standard cuirassier pattern for that time; with the same star on the lid as was on the sabertache but of forged and stamped metal instead of embroidered.

Shabrack and pistol carriers [cheprak i chushki] – of crimson cloth with a single row of silver galloon, and the same stars as on the sabertache (Illus. 1987).

Greatcoat [shinel’] – of gray cloth, with a standing collar and two shoulder straps of black cloth; the same buttons as on the kolet coat (Illus. 1987).

Forage cap [furazhnaya shapka] – of white cloth, with a black cloth band and red cloth piping between the seams; a white and crimson tassel with a slide [gaika] according to the squadron: in the 1st—white, in the 2nd—sky blue, in the 3rd—yellow (Illus. 1987).

All other items were prescribed to be the same, and of the same patterns, as for the Army Cuirrasier regiments described above (6).

Non-commissioned officers – had silver galloon on the coat collar and cuffs (Illus. 1988), while trumpeters had swallows’ nests at the shoulders, in the same color as the collar, and sewn-on silver galloon stripes. In other respects distinctions of these ranks from private Cavalier Guardsmen were the same as in Army Cuirassier regiments (7).

Officers – had uniform clothing of the same colors and patterns as for private Cavalier Guardsmen, but without piping at the shoulder seams; a silver galloon shoulder strap on the left shoulder; straight-sided silver galloon, piped in red cloth down its edges, at the coat’s front opening and on the pouch belt; the same broadsword hilt as for lower ranks, with that sword being worn in a frog. Shabracks and pistol carriers werer trimmed with toothed silver galloon. All else was prescribed to be the same as for officers of HIS MAJESTY’s Leib-Cuirassier Regiment (Illus. 1989 and 1990) (8).

29 December 1802 – Confirmation was given to a table of uniforms, accouterments, and arms for the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, based on which it was given the same uniforms, weaponry, and horse furniture as received in this year by HIS MAJESTY’s Leib-Cuirassier Regiment, but with a crimson collar and cuffs, sewn-on lace or buttonhole loops after pattern used in the L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii Regiment, crimson piping and collar tabs on the greatcoat, copper (“red brass”) buttons and other metal appointments—but gilt for officers, gold galloon (including on the pouch belt), dark-blue shabracks and pistol carriers that for lower ranks are trimmed with red tape decorated with yellow tracery. A further difference was that for Army Cuirassiers the carbine hook was on the pouch belt, but in the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment the hook and the pouch had their own belts worn crosswises, as related above for the Cavalier Guards. Officers wore an aiguilette on the right shoulder (Illus. 1991, 1992, 1993, and 1994) (9). Kettledrum banners were of crimson velvet with gold (Illus. 1995) (10), while the kettledrums and trumpets themselves, from the founding of the regiment, remained silver.

Like Army Cuirassier officers, the officers of the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment had an undress coat and frock coat [vitse-mundir i sertuk], of which the first was referred to as the red undress coat and the second as the dark-green undress coat.

The red undress coat for officers of the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment was of the same pattern as established in 1802 for the white cuirassier undress coat but in red, with dark-blue collar, cuffs, skirttail lining, and turnbacks, and with gold embroidered buttonhole loops on the collar and cuffs (Illus. 1996). The frock coat or dark-green undress coat was also of Army Cuirassier pattern, but with red piping and gold buttons (Illus. 1997). The shabrack and pistol carriers for use with both undress coats were prescribed to be of the same patterns as used with white Cuirassier undress coats, in dark blue with gold embroidery (Illus. 1997) (11).

13 February 1803 – The silver buttonhole loops on the cuffs of lower ranks in the Cavalier Guards Regiment were removed, and instead they were ordered to have two buttons on each cuff. These buttons were the same as on the shoulder straps. The decorative tracery buttonhole loop on the hat was replaced with narrow straight-sided lace, without any toothed pattern (Illus. 1998) (12).

18 October 1803 – When in formation, all combatant ranks of the Cavalier Guards and L.-Gds. Horse Regiment were ordered to wear helmets with thick hair plumage. These were the same as introduced at this same time for Army Cuirassiers, Dragoons, and Horse Artillery, but with copper (“red brass”) fittings and with a star in front instead of an eagle. For lower ranks the star was of stamped out of the brass while for officers it was silver and separately attached, with enamel on the rim of the circle and in the circle itself (Illus. 1999, 2000, and 2001) (13).

6 November 1803 – The Cavalier Guards Regiment was ordered to have all its uniform clothing of the same patterns as laid down for the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, but with white buttons. Horse furniture was left as before, unchanged (14).

14 March 1804 – Confirmation was given to a new table for the Cavalier Guards Regiment, which along with the order of 6 November 1803 presented above was the basis for all uniforms, accouterments, and weapons of this regiment being prescribed to be the same as for the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment except: white buttons; black collars and shoulder straps on the greatcoats; light colored [svetlyi] buttons on the riding trousers for all ranks; red shabracks and pistol carriers; galloon and all officer appointments silver; and black velvet for the collar, cuffs, and piping on the white turnbacks of officers’ red undress coats, as well as for officers’ undress shabracks and pistol carriers. Another difference from the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment was that silver embroidery in the form of buttonhole loops was left on the cuffs and skirttails of the red undress coats of Cavalier Guards officers (Illus. 2002) (15).

4 April 1804 – For everyday service, Cavalier Guards generals and field and company-grade officers were given dark-green frock coats, or undress coats, of the same pattern as described above for the Horse Guards, but with black velvet collar, cuffs, and piping (down the front coat opening, around the lining on the skirttails, and on the pocket flaps) with silver buttons (Illus. 2002) (16). About this time, officers of both the Cavalier Guards and Horse Guards were ordered to wear hats with a buttonhole loop made from narrow galloon (the same color as the buttons) and with a tall plume (Illus. 2002) (17).

24 May 1804Shabracks and pistol carriers for lower ranks in the Cavalier Guards Regiment were ordered to have two rows of yellow woolen tape [bason] with a black cloth inlay between them (Illus. 2003). Lower ranks of the L.-Gds regiment were to have the same tape with a red cloth inlay (Illus. 2004). Officers of the Cavalier Guards Regiment were to have two rows of silver galloon with a black velvet inlay between them (Illus. 2005), and officers of the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment—two rows of gold galloon with a red cloth inlay (Illus. 2006) (18).

5 March 1805 – In the Cavalier Guards and L.-Gds. Horse Regiments pistols were ordered to be shorter than before and of the same pattern as pistols throughout the heavy Cavalry (19). Also around this time, flankers [flankera] of the second of these regiments were given rifles [shtutsera] in place of carbines [karabiny] (20).

13 March 1806 – The same rifles were given to flankers in the Cavalier Guards Regiment (21).

10 October 1806 – In both regiments the previously authorized sheepskin warm coats [fufaiki ili polushubki] for lower ranks were withdrawn (22).

2 December 1806 – Lower ranks were ordered to cut off their queues and keep their hair short. Generals and field and company-grade officers, however, were in this matter allowed to proceed according to their personal inclination (23).

17 September 1807 — Generals and field and company-grade officers of both regiments were ordered to wear an epaulette [epolet] instead of a shoulder strap on the left shoulder of the kolet coat as well as of both undress coats. The epaulette was to be of the same pattern as established at this time for Guards infantry, of the same color as the buttons: silver in the Cavalier Guards and gold in the Horse Guards (Illus. 2007 and 2008). In this year Guards officers stopped carrying canes and wearing queues, and continued to powder their hair only for grand parades and appearances at HIGHEST Court (24).

26 January 1808 - Generals at parades, on designated calendar days [tabelnye dni], and at troop formations in general, in peacetime as well as during wartime, were ordered to wear the newly introduced standard general’s coat [obshchii generalskii mundir]. And with the regimental coat when not on duty, they were to have dark-green pants instead of white (25).

[Note by M.C.: The actual order referenced here (PSZ 22,784) actually reads differently:

"The Sovereign Emperor orders that General Officers, when commanding just a single regiment of which they are the Chef (honorary colonel), and engaged in normal everyday guard mounts, may wear the regimental uniform, but at parades, on designated calendar days, and at all gatherings of several troop units, in peacetime as well as during wartime, they must wear the newly introduced standard General’s coat, being allowed during the time they are not on duty to also wear dark-green cloth pants instead of white."

This order was to the entire army and did not mention any regiments in particular, and when properly interpreted I believe it spares us the ghastly image of dark-green pants being worn with white kolet coats.]

12 November 1808 – Cavalier Guards and Horse Guards field and company-grade officers, on normal everyday service when wearing the dark-green undress coat, were allowed to wear cloth pants of that same color (26).

26 November 1808 - Both regiments were ordered to have new-style flat plumes on their helmets while on campaign. For officers, noncommissioned officers, and privates, these were black, and for musicians—red. The previous chinstrap was replaced by new ones with flat brass scales (Illus. 2009 and 2010) (27). In this same year, long-skirted dark-green frock coats[sertuki] were introduced for officers, with white lining, buttons the same color as on the kolet coat, and the same collar as on the dark-green undress coat, i.e. black velvet in the Cavalier Guards and dark-green cloth with red piping in the Horse Guards (Illus. 2010) (28).

6 December 1808 – Distinguished Officer Candidates [estandart-yunkera] and non-commissioned officers in both regiments were ordered to have two shoulder straps on their kolet coats instead of just one (29).

27 March 1809 – Instead of one epaulette, Cavalier Guards and Horse Guards generals and field and company-grade officers were ordered to have two, and with this the aiguilettes which they had worn were abolished (Illus. 2011) (30).

6 April 1809Noncommissioned officers were ordered to have galloon not on the lower and side edges of the collar, but on the upper and side edges (Illus. 2012) (31).

8 June 1809 - The plumage around the sides of generals’ hats was discontinued and the former pattern of embroidered buttonhole was replaced with a new one made of four thick, twisted cords, of which the two middle ones were intertwined with each other in the form of a plait (32).

16 June 1810 - Carbines and pistols for both regiments were ordered to be made according to newly confirmed patterns. Both of these were of indentical caliber with infantry muskets (seven lines, measured in English inches [i.e. 0.7 inches - M.C.]), and along with this the first of these were prescribed to no longer be called carbines, but cuirassier muskets [kirasirskiya ruzhya] (33). In this same year new-pattern broadswords [palashi] were introduced, with a brass hilt and all-iron scabbard, without any leather (Illus. 2012). Also, the high plumes on the generals’ and officers’ hats were shortened (34).

16 September 1811 – In both regiments, the rings on cartridge pouches for attaching them to the crossbelt were removed, and it was ordered that the pouches were to be worn in the fashion of infantry pouches, i.e. with the ends of the crossbelt put under the cartridge pouch (35).

23 September 1811 – A new pattern for forage caps was laid down, the same as introduced at this time for Army Cuirassier regiments: in the Cavalier Guards Regiment—white with a black band and piping, and in the L.-Gds. Horse Regiments—also white, with a red band and piping. Both ahd the squadron number in yellow cord on the band (Illus. 2013). Officers were prescribed the same forage cap but with a visor of black lacquered leather and without any number on the band (36).

In the beginning of 1812 all ranks of the Cavalier Guards and Horse Guards regiments were ordered to make the collars on coats and greatcoats lower than before, and closed with small hooks (Illus. 2013). Private cuirassiers and non-commissioned officers were given black cuirasses with red lining, in all respects identical to those introduced at this time for Army Cuirassiers (Illus. 2014 and 2015). The thick plumage on officers’ helmets for parades was completely abolished, and they were also ordered to have gloves with gauntlets (Illus. 2015) (37).

10 November 1812 - Carbines were withdrawn from both regiments, and subsequently the only firearms left were pistols and 16 rifles [shtutsera] in each squadron for the flankers (38).

27 December 1812 – The tassels and loops [kisti i gaiki] on the sword knots of the two new squadrons added to each regiment were ordered to be: 6th Squadron – red; 7th, reserve, Squadron – white with an admixture of red (39).

13 April 1813 – With the renaming of HIS MAJESTY’s Leib-Cuirassier Regiment as the Life-Guards Cuirassier Regiment and its inclusion in the New, or Young, Guard, it kept all its previous uniform clothing, i.e. white with sky blue, with—for lower ranks—white buttonhole loops on the collars and cuffs, with a stripe of sky blue down the center (Illus. 2016 and 2018). Officer—who on this occasion were ordered to have pouch belts trimmed with silver galloon—had silver buttonhole loops, on the kolet coat (Illus. 2018) as well as on the white undress coat. The latter had, as before, a sky-blue collar, cuffs, and piping on the skirts and turnbacks. Along with this, shabracks and pistol carriers were ordered to be trimmed with blue [svetlosinnii] cloth with two rows of white lace for lower ranks (Illus. 2017) and two rows of silver galloon for officers (40).

7 December 1813 – Officers of the Cavalier Guards and L.-Gds. Cuirassier Regiments were ordered to have collars on the frock coat as follows: for the first—of dark-green cloth with red piping instead of being of black velvet, thus matching the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment, and for the second—dark-green with sky-blue piping, instead of being all sky blue. From this time, both in these two regiments as well as in the L.-Gds. Horse, cuffsand cuff flaps began to be trimmed with piping of the same color as the piping on the collar. Also, in the Cavalier Guards Regiment the black collar on the greatcoat was replaced by a gray cloth one with red cloth piping, with a black patch or tab [nakladka ili klapan] and—on the tab—a white button (41).

6 April 1814 – The double-breasted undress coats, red for officers of the Cavalier Guards and L.-Gds. Horse Regiment and white for the L.-Gds. Cuirassiers, were ordered to be single-breasted, with nine buttons. Likewise, the dark-green undress coats were to have nine buttons instead of eight (Illus. 2019) (42).

20 May 1814 – In the three regiments mentioned above, officers as well as lower ranks, were given single-breasted dress coats [kolety] with nine buttons, in place of the double-breasted ones. These had piping—in the same color as the collar—down the front and around the bottom to the tails, and white piping on the collar (Illus. 2020 and 2021). At this same time, the campaign riding trousers with buttons, used by officers since 1802, were replaced by new ones, grey as before, with two wide stripes [lampasy] and piping, of the same color as the dress coat’s collar, and without leather on the inner seams (Illus. 2020) (43).

19 August 1814 - Similar riding trousers, except with leather on the seams, were also given to lower ranks (Illus. 2021) (44).

30 August 1814 – The L.-Gds. Cuirassier Regiment was ordered to have helmets with stars (Illus. 2022) and bandoleers [pantalery], of the same patterns as for the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment (45).

15 September 1814 - Each of these regiments was ordered to have 1120 carbines [karabiny] and 112 rifles [shtutsera]. In this same year a white band was added to the cockade on officer’s hats, and which later was replaced with a silver one (46).

16 December 1815 – It was directed that trumpeters in these regiments have gray horses, and other ranks—dark colors (47).

In this same year the black velvet collars and piping on red undress coats in the Cavalier Guards Regiment were changed to dark-blue cloth. Cavalier Guards officers also had the plumage on their hats removed (Illus. 2023) (48).

29 December 1815 – Lower ranks of the Cavalier Guards, L.-Gds. Horse, and L.-Gds. Cuirassiers were ordered to have chamois [zamshevyi] gloves as previously, but with deerskin [losinnyi] guantlet cuffs (49).

24 January 1816 - Scabbards for officers’ swords [shpagi] were ordered to be of black, lacquered leather (50).

13 Marcy 1816 – When assigning remounts to the Cavalier Guards, L.-Gds. Horse, and L.-Gds. Cuirassiers, it was ordered that chestnuts, blacks, bays, browns, sorrels, and grays [gnedye, voronye, karie, burye, ryzhie i serye] be selected. The last color was only for trumpeters. Care was to be taken that the horses were not less than 2 arshins 2-1/2 vershoks [64-3/4 inches] high (51).

21 September 1816 - For carrying rifles when in formation, carabiniers were ordered to have bandoleers with hooks on which to hang the rifles, as used at this time in Horse-Jäger and Lancer regiments and related above for Army Cuirassiers (52).

6 May 1817 Trumpeters in the Cavalier Guards and L.-Gds. Horse were ordered to trim their dress coats with yellow tape [bason] with a red stripe or light, and in the L.-Gds. Cuirassiers—with white tape with a sky-blue stripe or light. Their swallows’ nests or wings were to be according to the color of the collar: red in the first two regiments and sky blue in the last (Illus. 2024) (53).

8 August 1817 - The scales on chinstraps were ordered to be raised or convex, instead of flat (54).

2 March 1818 – The newly established L.-Gds. Podolia Cuirassier Regiment in Warsaw was prescribed to have: white kolet coat of the normal cuirassier pattern, with yellow cloth collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, piping, and lining on the tails and turnbacks, and white buttons. On both sides of the collar was a single tab of dark-blue cloth with a buttonhole loop (of yellow guards tape for lower ranks and in silver for officers) and button. Deerskin pants; gray riding trousers with yellow stripes and piping; yellow shabrack and pistol carriers, these being of cloth, with guards-pattern stars and trimmed around with dark-blue cloth and two rows of yellow tape, or silver galloon for officers. All other items of uniform clothing were as used in the Cavalier Guards, L.-Gds. Horse, and L.-Gds. Cuirassiers, except that the galloon on officers’ pouches was silver with yellow piping (Illus. 2025, 2026, 2027, and 2028). Horses in this regiment were blacks (55).

8 November 1818 – To bring them into conformity with other Guards regiments, non-commissioned officers of the Cavalier Guards, L.-Gds. Horse, and L.-Gds. Cuirassiers were ordered to have only one buttonhole loop on their collar instead of two (Illus. 2029) (56).

In this same year the supporting straps on cuirasses were ordered to be longer than before, as was first introduced in the Podolia Regiment (Illus. 2025, 2026, and 2027) (57).

In 1820 – For trumpeters in all four regiments, the chevrons on their coats began to be sewn on closer together than previously, and tape was put all around the collar. For all ranks, white piping was removed from kolet coat collars (Illus. 2030) (58).

25 July 1822 – In the Cavalier Guards Regiment the black trim on red shabracks and pistol carriers was ordered to be changed to dark-blue cloth. The tab or patch on greatcoat collars was changed from black to red cloth, and forage caps were to have a red band and black piping (Illus. 2031) (59).

In March of 1823 – With the decision that Guards Cavalry regiments have horses of one color, the Cavalier Guards Regiment was ordered to have chestnuts, the L.-Gds. Horse and L.-Gds. Podolia Cuirassiers—blacks, and the L.-Gds. Cuirassiers—sorrels (60).

29 March 1825 - For combatant lower ranks, for faultless service, there were established stripes [nashivki] to be sewn on the left sleeve: for 10 years service—one, for 15 years—two, for 20 years—three; one over the other, all of yellow tape [tesma] (61).




XXXIV. GUARDS DRAGOONS.
[Gvardeiskie draguny.]


12 January 1809 – The newly formed L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment was ordered to have the exact same uniform as received by the L.-Gds. Lithuania Regiment in 1811, except that the cuffs were slit, without flaps, and had two buttonhole loops and buttons. Helmets were the same pattern as for the Cavalier Guards and Horse Guards. Badges on the pouches were the same as for Guards heavey infantry. Saddlecloths [valtrapy] were dark green, with lower ranks having red cloth trim, monograms, and crowns, and two rows of yellow woolen tape on the trim. Officers had red cloth trim with two rows of gold galloon and silver stars. All else in regard to uniforms, accouterments, and weapons was prescribed to be the same as used in Army Dragoon regiments (Illus. 2032, 2033, and 2034). For everyday dress [v-budni] officers wore: dark-green pants instead of white; hats with a tall white plume; cavalry swords [shpagi] with a silver sword knot (Illus. 2035), and frock coats. This last item was of the same pattern as for the L.-Gds. Preobrazhenskii and Lithuania Regiments (62).

16 June 1810 – Musketoons [mushkety] and pistols for the regiment were ordered to be made according to the newly confirmed pattern. Both of them were of the same caliber as infantry muskets (seven lines, measured in English inches), and along with this the first weapon was prescribed not to be called a musketoon, but a dragoon musket [dragunskoe ruzh’e] (63). Also in this year, the plumes on the hats of generals and officers were shortened (64).

16 September 1811 – For combatant lower ranks, all buckles, prongs, and end pieces on cartridge-pouch belts, the hooks for muskets, and the rings for pouches—were all removed, and it was ordered that the pouches be worn in the manner of infantry cartridge pouches, i.e. passing the end of the crossbelt under the pouch (65).

23 September 1811 – A new pattern of forage cap was confirmed for the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, identical with that established at this time for the other Guards regiments. It was dark green in color with a red band and a yellow squadron number on the band. Officers wore the same caps but without a number, with a visor of black lacquered leather (66).

5 December 1811Kettledrums were abolished in the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment (67).

In the beginning of 1812, collars on tailcoats, greatcoats, and officers’ frock coats were ordered to be lower than currently, fastened by little hooks, with the same sewn-on lace as the L.-Gds. Lithuania Regiment had at this time, i.e. in yellow with red stripes for lower ranks, and gold, as previously, for officers (Illus. 2036 and 2037). In addition, the thick plumage on officers’ helmets for parades was abolished (68).

10 November 1812Muskets were withdrawn, and consequently the Leib-Dragoons’ firearms consisted only of pistols, except for flankers (16 in each squadron), who also had rifles (69).

27 December 1812 – The squadrons newly added to the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment were ordered to have sword knot tassels and slides as follows: 6th Squadron – red, 7th, reserve – white with an admixture of red (70).

20 May 1814 – Officers’ riding trousers [reituzy] with buttons, as used since the regiment was formed, were replaced by new ones of the previous gray color, with wide red stripes and piping and without leather along the inside seams (71).

19 August 1814 – Similar riding trousers, except with leather reinforcements, were given to lower ranks (72).

14 September 1814 – In addition to the 112 rifles from 1812, the regiment was given 1120 muskets [ruzh’ya]. In this same year a white band was added to the cockade on officer’s hats, and which was later replaced with by silver one (72).

16 December 1815 - Trumpeters were oredered to have grey horses, and other ranks — dark colors (74).

13 March 1816 - When assigning remounts to the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, it was ordered that chestnuts, blacks, bays, browns, sorrels, and grays be selected. The last color was only for trumpeters. Care was to be taken that the horses were not less than 2 arshins 1 vershok [57-3/4 inches] high, and no more than 2 arshins 3 vershoks [61-1/4 inches] (75).

28 February 1817 – When in formation or in full uniform [polnaya forma], officers were ordered to have pouches [lyadunki] of the pattern used by Army Dragoon and Horse-Jäger regiments, with gold galloon on the belt and a silver badge, buckle, prong, end piece, prickers, and chain (76).

8 March 1817 – The regiment was given new uniforms of the pattern used at this time in Army Dragoon regiments, but keeping the previous colors of the lapels, the buttonhole loops, and guards badge on the shako (Illus. 2038 and 2039) (77).

14 March 1817 - Field and company-grade officers of the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, when in formation with troops or when wearing sashes, were ordered to be in dress coats with short tails without pocket flaps, and wearing cartridge pouches (78).

6 May 1817Trumpeters were ordered to have tape sewn onto their coats, yellow with thin red stripes, and wings or shoulder pieces [kryl’tsa ili naplechniki] of the same color as the collar—red (Illus. 2040) (79).

16 February 1819 – For use on campaign, the regiment was given covers for shakos and plumes, identical to those established at this same time for Army Dragoon regiments (80).

28 February 1819 – Generals and field and company-grade officers were given a new pattern of saber, with a brass hilt instead of iron, with a black leather grip wound round with brass wire, and with an iron scabbard. Officers possessing a gold saber awarded for military distinction were ordered to have a gold grip in the hilt; bands on the scabbard and the rings on these bands were to be brass, and on the arcs of the guard was inscribed “for courage” [“za khrabrost’”] (Illus. 2041) (81).

20 February 1820 – Instead of hair plumes on the shakos, the regiment was directed to have small oblong plumes or pompons [sultanchiki ili pompony]: for lower ranks—yellow, of wool; for officers—silver. However, these were not to be worn until specifically ordered, and meanwhile only the previous pompon [repeiki] was to be on the shako, without a plume (Illus. 2041) (82).

7 August 1820 – Generals and field and company-grade officers of the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiments were allowed to wear moustaches (83). Also, beginning in this year the tape on musicians’ coats began to be worn more closely together and around the whole collar (Illus. 2041) (84).

In March of 1823 - With the introduction of the rule that Guards Cavalry regiments have horses of one color, the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment was ordered to have blacks (85).

18 December 1823 – In was ordered that the pompons prescribed in 1820 be worn (Illus. 2042) (86).

29 March 1825 –For faultless service, chevrons sewn on the left sleeve were established for combatant lower ranks: for 10 years of service—one; for 15 years—two; and for 20—three, one over the other; all of yellow tape (87).

18 August 1825 – The oblong pompons of lower ranks and officers were changed to round ones (Illus. 2043) (88).




XXXV. GUARDS HORSE-JÄGERS.
[Gvardeiskie konnye yegerya.]


26 June 1814 – The newly formed Life-Guards Horse-Jäger Regiment was ordered to have the same uniforms, accouterments, and arms as issued at this time to Army Horse Jägers, but with a red collar, cuffs, shoulder straps, piping, and trim on the skirttails and pants. Four buttonhole loops were prescribed for the collar, and one on each cuff; for lower ranks—whitewith a red light; for officers—silver. The shako had a guards pattern badge, and its cords were white and its pompon green. The pouch badge was the guards pattern with an eight-pointed star. The saddlecloth was red, having for lower ranks two rows of white tape on a dark-green backing, with red monograms and crowns trimmed with thin white cord (Illus. 2044 and 2045), and for officers two rows of silver galloon on the same dark-green backing, and with silver stars (Illus. 2046). When in formation on parade officers wore coats with short tails, but for everyday wear and when not in formation with long tails (89).

19 August 1814 – Lower ranks, instead of the prescribed gray riding trousers for campaign use, with covered buttons on the side seams, were ordered to have trousers with wide red stripes and piping, and leather along the inner seams. Officers had the same riding trousers that they used since the founding of the regiment, except without leather (90).

In the same year of 1814Cockades on officers’ hats were ordered to have a white ribbon around them, later changed to silver (91).

1 February 1816 – In place of red collars, all lower ranks were given dark-green ones with red piping and likewise red tabs. The collars on dress coats were to have one buttonhole loop on each side—white for lower ranks and silver for officers, with a button (Illus. 2047). Also, the colors of the saddlecloth were prescribed to be reversed from previously: instead of red with dark green, they were to be dark green with red trim, with the monograms for lower ranks remaining as before, without change (Illus. 2047) (92).

13 March 1816 – When assigning remounts to the L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, it was ordered that any color horse be selected except light bays [solovye], Isabellas [izabely, i.e. palominos], spotted [chubarye], sorrel or light-brown Tatar breeds [kaurye], light chestnuts tending to yellow [savrasye], and pigeon grays or ash colors [golubye] (93).

17 March 1817 – On officers’ undress tailcoats [vitse-mundiry], i.e. the dress coats with long tails [mundiry s dlinnymi faldami], the turnbacks on the tails were ordered to be dark green, while the piping on the turnbacks and on the elongated pocket flaps was to be red (Illus. 2048) (94). Also, officers were given frock coats [sertuki] with the same collar as on the dress coat but without buttonhole loops, and with dark-green lining (Illus. 2049).

6 May 1817Trumpeters were ordered to have red wings or shoulder pieces instead of dark green, while the sewn-on tape was white, as before, but with a thin red stripe down the middle (Illus. 2050) (95). In this same year all combatant lower ranks were given a shako higher than previously, with a flat top and convex chinscales. Privates’ carbines without bayonets were replaced with new weapons, with bayonets, that received the name Horse-Jäger muskets [Konno-Yegerskiya ruzh’ya]. These were identical to those introduced at this time for Army Horse Jägers (Illus. 2050) (96).

16 February 1819 – When on campaign or in camp, the L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment was ordered to have covers on shakos and plumes, identical to those established at this time for Army Dragoon and Horse-Jäger regiments (97).

28 February 1819 – Generals and field and company-grade officers were given new sabers of the same pattern as that established at this time for the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment (98).

4 April 1819 – In the L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment the dark-green pants were ordered to have sewn-on cuffs of black leather, as for Dragoons (99).

20 February 1820 – It was directed that the shakos in the L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment, instead of hair plumes, have small oblong plumes or pompons [sultanchiki ili pomony]: of white wool for lower ranks, and silver for officers. However, these were not to be worn until so ordered, and until then the shakos were left with just the old pompons [repeiki] without plumes (100). From this same year the tape on trumpeters’ coats began to be sewn on closer together, and around the entire collar (Illus. 2051) (101).

In March 1823 – With the introduction of the rule that Guards Cavalry regiments have horses of one color, the L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiment was ordered to have grays (102).

18 December 1823 – It was ordered to wear the pompons proposed in 1820 (Illus. 2052) (103).

29 March 1825 - For faultless service, chevrons sewn on the left sleeve were established for combatant lower ranks: for 10 years of service — one; for 15 years — two; and for 20 — three, one over the other; all of yellow tape (104).

18 August 1825 – For both lower ranks and officers the oblong pompons were changed to round (Illus. 2053) (105).




XXXVI. GUARDS HUSSARS.
[Gvardeiskie gusary.]


11 May 1801 – The L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment was ordered to have dark-blue dolmans and red pelisses, sabertaches, and saddlecloths. However, in all regards the previous patterns were continued, as were the existing uniform clothing, accouterments, weapons, and horse furniture (Illus. 2054, 2055, and 2056) (106).

21 July 1801 – Generals and field and company-grade officers of the troops in the St.-Petersburg garrison, including the L.-Gds. Hurssar Regiment, were ordered, when wearing undress coats, to wear hats of the same pattern as that introduced at this time for other regiments of Guards cavalry (107).

29 December 1802 – Confirmation was given to a new table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, based on which, as well as on a supplementary directive of 20 August 1803, this regiment was prescribed all the uniforms, accouterments, weaponry, and horse furniture as Army Hussar regiments (Illus. 2057, 2058, 2059, and 2060), while colors remained as before, except for saddlecloths [valtrapy] which, instead of the red prescribed on 11 May 1801, were ordered to be the same dark blue as the dolmans, and with a new pattern of piped embroidery, namely: yellow with two rows of thin yellow cord and two of red, sewn on with crenelations [gorodki] and small rings. Also, the eagles on the corners were replaced with monograms of yellow cloth trimmed, as were the crowns, with thin red cord. Cord of the same color, but thicker, was prescribed to be sewn around the edge of the entire saddlecloth (Illus. 2058). Sabertaches remained red, as before, with yellow monogram, crown, and edge, but trimmed with thin black cord that was not previously prescribed (Illus. 2058). Officers—who from this time no longer had the decorative leather harness (sarsam) on their horses—were given cartridge pouches and new pattern sabertaches and saddlecloths. The cartridge pouch, of black leather, was covered in very dark-blue velvet, mounted in gilded bronze fittings, and had on the cover a two-headed eagle surrounded by rays, also of the same kind of bronze (Illus. 2061 and 2062). The pouch belt, of red morocco, was trimmed on the outer side with gold galloon mixed with very dark-blue silk, and decorated with a gold laurel wreath enclosing the HIGHEST monogram. All its fittings were metal, that is to say: prickers, chain, buckle, slide, and endpiece, gilded and with the same decorative tracing as on the cartidge pouch’s mountings (Illus. 2061 and 2062). The sabertache, also of red morocco, was trimmed on its upper surface with red cloth, as before, on which was rich gold embroidery with the HIGHEST monogram under a crown, and, and with a palm branch of green silk (Illus. 2061 and 2062). The saddlecloth, of dark-blue cloth, was trimmed around the edges with wide toothed gold galloon and thin cord. At the ends, of embroidered gold, silver, and silk, were: the monogram of the EMPEROR, a crown, and a stand of arms (Illus. 2061 and 2062). The undress coat [vitse-mundir], with which was worn the standard cavalry hat and saber, was the same as in other Hussar regiments, i.e. dark green, with red lining and skit turnbacks, but it had a red collar and cuffs with gold tracery ( the same color as the buttons), and on the right shoulder a gold aiguilette (Illus. 2063) (108).

In 1804 – The hat prescribed for the officer’s undress coat was ordered to be of the same pattern as that established at this time for the whole Army, i.e. with a buttonhole loop of narrow galloon and not embroidered, and with a high plume (Illlus. 2064) (109).

4 April 1805 – The collar on the cloaks for field and company-grade officers, previously gray with red piping, were replaced with ones completely red (110).

1 October 1806 – The warm coats [fufaiki], or short fur coats [polushubki], prescribed for lower ranks were withdrawn (111).

2 December 1806 - Lower ranks lost their queues and side curls and were ordered to cut their hair short under a comb, while Generals and officers were allowed to proceed in this regard according to their own wishes (112).

17 September 1807 – When wearing the undress coat, generals and field and company-grade officers were ordered to have the previous gold aiguilette on the right shoulder, and on the left shoulder—an epaulette. This was to be of the same pattern as that established at this time for the rest of the Guards regiments (Illus. 2064) (113).

12 November 1808 – Officers, when wearing the undress coat, were ordered to have dark-green chakchiry pants (114).

27 March 1809 – These same persons, when in the undress coat, were ordered to have two epaulettes, and consequently the aiguilette was taken away (115).

25 April 1809 – All combatant ranks in the regiment, instead of the white chakchiry pants, were ordered to have dark-blue ones, the same color as the dolman, decorated (in front, on the side seams, and behind) with galloon and flat thin cord or braid—yellow for lower ranks (Illus. 2056 and 2066) and gold for officers (Illus. 2067 and 2068) (116). Along with this change these same personnel were given new shakos in all respects the same as for Guards infantry, but with a difference in the color of the pompon, which for privates was yellow surrounding a red center (117). Privates had a white hair plume, non-commissioned officers—white with black and orange at the top, trumpeters—red, staff trumpeters—red with black and orange at the top, and officers—all white (Illus. 2065 and 2067) (118).

8 June 1809 - The plumage on generals’ hats (when wearing the undress coat) was discontinued and the former pattern of buttonhole was replaced with a new one made of four thick, twisted cords, of which the two middle ones were intertwined with each other in the form of a plait (119).

20 November 1809 – Instead of dark-blue dolmans, the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment was ordered to have red ones with dark-blue collar and cuffs, and on the barrel sash, or girdle, the slides were to be dark blue instead of red (Illus. 2065 and 2067) (120). In this same year officers were given frock coats [sertuki] of dark-green cloth with red lining, a red collar, dark-green cuffs piped red, and the same gold decorative tracery on the collar and cuffs as on the undress coat (Illus. 2069) (121).

10 February 1810 – The shako cords of private Hussars and trumpeters, instead of being yellow with red, were ordered to be just yellow. However, for non-commissioned officers and staff-trumpeters they were white with black and orange. Officers’ shako cords remained silver with black and orange. Along with this, all combatant ranks were given plumes of a new design, thinner than before and wider at the top than at the bottom, as was introduced throughout the whole Light cavalry beginning in 1812 (Illus. 2070) (122).

16 June 1810Carbines and pistols for the Guards Hussars were ordered to be made according to newly confirmed patterns. Both of these were of indentical caliber with infantry muskets (seven lines, measured in English inches [i.e. 0.7 inches - M.C.]) (123). In this same year the plumes on generals’ and officers’ hats were shortened, canes were abolished, and officers’ shako cords became completely silver without any admixture of black and orange silk (124).

17 January 1811Shako cords for non-commissioned officers and staff-trumpeters were ordered to be as for privates—yellow—and only their tassels would be in three colors: white, black, and orange (125).

23 September 1811 – The L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment was given new forage caps of the pattern introduced at this time throughout the Guards and Army, colored dark blue with a red band (126).

In the beginning of 1812 – The L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment was given new shakos, lower than before, with a pronounced expansion or widening toward the top and indented at the sides. Also, the collars of pelisses, dolmans, cloaks, and officers’ undress and frock coats were ordered to be lower than before, without a diagonal opening in front and instead closed with small hooks (Illus. 2071 and 2072) (127).

10 December 1812Carbines and bandoleers are withdrawn from the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, and subsequently the only remaining firearms were pistols and the sixteen musketoons (for the flankers) in each squadron (128).

6 April 1814 – Officers’ undress coats were ordered to be singlebreasted with nine buttons, and as before with red collar and cuffs and red piping down the front opening and below to the turnbacks (Illus. 2073). Frock coats were to be without the gold decoration, with round cuffs instead of the previous pointed ones, and with white lining instead of red (Illus. 2073) (129).

20 May 1814 – The gray riding trousers for campaign wear that officers had since 1802, with buttons and leather reinforcements, were replaced by new ones of the previous gray color but without buttons and leather. The new trousers had wide stripes and piping the same color as the collar on the undress coat, i.e. red (Illus. 2073) (130).

19 August 1814 – Similar riding trousers, except with leather reinforcements, were given to lower ranks (131).

15 September 1814 – The regiment was issued 1120 carbines and—in place of the musketoons—112 rifles [shtutsera], which were ordered to be worn on white bandoleers with brass buckles, prongs, and endpieces (132). In the same year of 1814, officers were ordered to have hats with white ribbon around the cockade, later changed to silver, and to no longer use the panther skins [barsy] authorized for parades since the time of EMPEROR PAUL I (133).

[Note by M.C.: An advertisement in Sanktpeterburgskiya Vedomosti, 20 January 1814, No. 7, announced that “Furrier Karl Steinberg... now in Sadovaya Street... makes fur coats of various sorts, women’s coats, muffs, gloves, etc., and also tiger skins lined with silver for Hussar Officers.”]

25 February 1816 – All combatant ranks were ordered to have five rows of buttons, instead of three, on dolmans and pelisses, with one row being of large size and four small. There was a new design for the gold tracery on pants; Boots and shakos became higher than before, with the latter having a flat top instead of indented (Illus. 2074 and 2075). Lower ranks were to sewn narrow yellow tape around the thin cord and cuffs of the pelisse and dolman (Illus. 2076 and 2077). Officers were to have pelisses and dolmans without fringes, and the cord on these was to be placed in rows side by side without any space in between. The fur on the pelisse was to be beaver, and the galloon on the swordbelt straps and sabertache, as well as the small tassels on boots—gold (Illus. 2077 and 2078) (134).

13 March 1816 - When assigning remounts to the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, it was ordered that any color horse be selected except light bay, Isabellas [i.e. palominos], spotted, sorrel or light-brown Tatar breeds, light chestnuts tending to yellow, and pigeon grays or ash colors (135).

16 April 1817 – The L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment’s previous red morocco cartidge pouches, with similar belts, were replaced with black leather ones with the same round badge as for the L.-Gds. Dragoon and L.-Gds. Horse-Jäger Regiments, a pistol ramrod on a white deerskin strap, and a whitened crossbelt, also of deerskin, which privates were ordered to wear not over the right shoulder as had been done previously, but over the left shoulder (Illus. 2078). Along with this, the regiment was given new sabers with a black grip and iron hilt, arched guards, and solid scabbards without cutouts (Illus. 2078) (136).

6 May 1817Trumpeters were ordered to have dark-blue swallows’ nests on the sleeves of their dolmans and pelisses, and sewn-on tape—yellow with thin red stripes (Illus. 2078) (137).

19 September 1817 – Shako chinscales, for lower ranks as well as officers, were ordered to be covex instead of flat (138).

10 August 1818 – The rings and edging on the collars and cuffs of officers’ undress coats were ordered to not be of thin cord and lace, as previously, but embroidered [vyshitye] (Illus. 2079) (139).

16 February 1819 – When on campaign or in camp, the regiment was ordered to have covers on shakos and plumes, identical to those established at this time for Guards Dragoons and Horse Jägers (140).

18 February 1819 – All combatant ranks in the regiment were given new shakos, higher than before, wrapped with red cloth instead of black; with yellow woolen tape for lower ranks and gold galloon for officers, on the sides and around the upper and lower edges (Illus. 2080) (141).

28 February 1819 – Field and company-grade officers were given new sabers of the same pattern as established at this time for the Life-Guards Dragoons and Life-Guards Horse Jägers (Illus. 2080) (142).

In March of 1823 - With the introduction of the rule that Guards Cavalry regiments have horses of one color, the Life-Guards Hussar Regiment was ordered to have grays (144).

19 February 1824 – The Life-Guards Grodno Hussar Regiment [Leib-Gvardii Grodnenskii Gusarskii polk], newly formed in Warsaw, was ordered to have: olive-colored [olivkovago sveta] dolmans and pelisses with white trim; fur on the pelisses to be black astrakhan; chakchiry pants, shakos, and sabertaches raspberry with white; white pompons; white waistbelts [poyasa], with raspberry slides (Illus. 2081, 2082, 2083, and 2084); in the shield of the eagle on the shako was the image of a Lithuanian horseman; wide stripes and piping on the riding trousers raspberry. Saddlecloths were prescribed to be raspberry with white trim and thin white and raspberry cord (Illus. 2085a), but it was permitted to use—and indeed such were used—fleece saddlecloths of black astrakhan. The latter was trimmed around with raspberry cloth, with an insert of thin white cord, and had white monograms and white crowns with thin raspberry cord. Both the monograms and the crowns were cut out of raspberry cloth, sewn onto the fleece (Illus. 2085b). Officers had uniform clothing of the same colors as lower ranks, but with silver appointments. The waistbelt, cartridge pouch, and galloon on the pouch crossbelt were silver (Illus. 2086 and 2087), while the undress coat had a dark-green collar and cuffs on which was raspberry piping, and raspberry cuffs and skirt turnbacks (Illus. 2088 and 2089b). In other regards, all patterns, accouterments, arms, and horse furniture in this regiment corresponed to those used in the Life-Guards Hussar Regiment, but horses were bays [kariya] (146).

29 March 1825 - For combatant lower ranks, for faultless service, there were established stripes [nashivki] to be sewn on the left sleeve: for 10 years service - one, for 15 years - two, for 20 years - three; one over the other, all of yellow tape (Illus. 2090) (147).

18 August 1825 – The hair plumes on shakos in Guards Hussar regiments were abolished, and in their place it was ordered to have round pompons: for lower ranks—of yellow wool, and for officers—silver (Illus. 2090) (148).




XXXVII. GUARDS LANCERS.
[Gvardeiskie ulany.]


12 December 1809 – The Life-Guards Lancer Regiment, formed from half of HIS HIGHNESS THE TSESAREVICH CONSTANTINE PAVLOVICH’S Lancer Regiment, was prescribed all the uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry, as well as horse furniture, as it had before this reorganization, except the shapka headdresses had a two-headed eagle of the standard guards pattern. Saddlecloths had two rows of yellow tape [bason] (gold galloon for officers) along red cloth trim. Buttons, badges, and other metal appointments on uniform clothing were copper [krasnaya med’, or “red brass”] instead of the previous yellow brass (Illus. 2091, 2092, 2093, 2094, and 2095) (149).

23 September 1811 – A new pattern of forage cap was confirmed for the Life-Guards Lancer Regiment, identical to that established at this time for the whole Army, very dark blue [temnosinii] in color with a red band (150).

20 November 1811Pennons on the lances in the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment were ordered to be of nankeen [kitaichatye] instead of taffeta [taftyanyi], without any change in color, i.e. white with red (151).

In the beginning of 1812 – In the Life-Guards Lancer Regiment collars on jackets and greatcoats were ordered to be lower than before and closed with small hooks. Thin plumes were issued that were wider at the top than at the bottom. Sabers with iron guards at the hilt were issued in all-iron scabbards (Illus. 2096) (152).

17 December 1812Pompons on lower ranks’ headdresses were ordered to be yellow instead of red, while officers’ cords and tassels [kitish-vitishi] were all silver without the previously used admixture of black and orange silk (Illus. 2096) (153).

20 May 1814 – The riding trousers for officers in use since 1803, with leather reinforcement and buttons, were replaced with new ones, gray as before but without leather and buttons, and with wide red stripes and piping (Illus. 2097) (154).

25 July 1814- The L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment was ordered to remake their uniform according to the pattern used by Polish Lancer regiments, i.e. with short skirts sewn together, with ten buttons, with the side of the skirt having a wide turnback of red cloth in the shape of a triangle, and in between these turnbacks, in two places, were cutout patches of dark-blue cloth like pocket flaps, with red cloth piping. The same piping ran down the center from the top or waist buttons to the bottom buttons (Illus. 2097 and 2098) (155).

19 August 1814 – Lower ranks of the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment were given a new pattern of riding trousers, similar to those established on 20 May for officers, except with leather on the lower leg (Illus. 2098) (156).

11 December 1815 – Officers of the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment were given frock coats like those established at this time for Army Lancer regiments, but with a red collar and dark-blue cuffs piped red (157).

16 December 1816 – Trumpeters were ordered to have gray horses, and other ranks to have dark colors [temnaya sherst’] (158).

13 March 1816 - When assigning remounts to the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, it was ordered that any color horse be selected except light bays, Isabellas, spotted, sorrel or light-brown Tatar breeds, light chestnuts tending to yellow, and pigeon grays or ash colors (159).

6 May 1817Trumpeters of the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, apart from their current sewn-on tape on wings and sleeves, were ordered to have additional tape on their lapels, along all seams, and along the edges of the skirt turnbacks (Illus. 2099) (160).

19 September 1817 – Lower ranks in the regiment were ordered to have convex chinscales on the headdress instead of flat. Officers, though, had chains as before (161).

2 March 1818The Grand Duke and Tsesarevich Constantine Pavlovich’s L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, newly established in Warsaw, was prescribed all the same uniform and other items—except for headdresses and lance pennons—as for the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, but with white distinctions instead of yellow. Yellow headdresses were issued, of the pattern used by regiments in the Lithuanian Lancer Division, with a Lithuanian horseman on the eagle’s shield. Lance pennons were red with yellow, while sewn-on tape on the uniforms of lower ranks was yellow with thin red stripes, as in the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment (Illus. 2100, 2101, 2102, and 2103) (162).

18 April 1818 – New headdresses were confirmed for the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, following the pattern used by THE GRAND DUKE AND TSESAREVICH CONSTANTINE PAVLOVICH’S L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment, but red instead of yellow, with the previous plate, and with yellow distinctions instead of white (Illus. 2104 and 2105) (163).

16 February 1819 - When on campaign or in camp, the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment was ordered to have covers on the headdress, identical to those established at this time for Army Lancer regiments (164).

28 February 1819 – Field and company-grade officers were given new sabers, of the same pattern as received at this time by the L.-Gds. Dragoons, L.-Gds. Horse Jägers, and L.-Gds. Hussars (Illus. 2106) (165).

In 1820 – Tape [bason] on trumpeters’ coats in both regiments began to be sewn on closer together and around the entire collar (Illus. 2107) (166).

21 December 1821 – Officers of both Guards Lancer regiments were ordered to have their horses “Anglicized” [anglizirovannye] [i.e. nicked, meaning cutting the tendon at the root of a cropped tail to make it stand up – M.C.] (167).

In 1822 – Lower ranks of THE GRAND DUKE AND TSESAREVICH CONSTANTINE PAVLOVICH’S L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment were given yellow epaulettes instead of white, in accordance with the color of the coat’s sewn-on tape (Illus. 2106 and 2107) (168).

In 1823 - With the introduction of the rule that Guards Cavalry regiments have horses of one color, the Life-Guards Lancer Regiment was ordered to have sorrels [ryzhie], and THE TSESAREVICH’S L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment—chestnuts [gnedye] (169).

29 March 1825 - For combatant lower ranks, for faultless service, there were established stripes to be sewn on the left sleeve: for 10 years service - one, for 15 years - two, for 20 years - three; one over the other, all of yellow tape (170).

18 August 1825 – Both Guards Lancer regiments were ordered to have round pompons on their headdresses instead of pyramidal, keeping the previous colors, i.e. yellow in the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiments and white in THE GRAND DUKE AND TSESAREVICH CONSTANTINE PAVLOVICH’S L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment. For officers in both regiments, pompons were silver (Illus. 2107 and 2108) (171).




XXXVIII. GUARDS COSSACKS.
[Gvardeiskie kazaki.]


14 March 1801 – Along with its previous uniform clothing, accouterments, and arms, the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment was ordered to have jackets [kurtky] or half-caftans [polukaftan’ya] and chekmen coats or caftans [kaftany] with standing collars, open in front (Illus. 2109). For their collars and cuffs, officers were given two rows of the same silver embroidery that up to this time they only had along the coat’s front opening, and when on parade or in formation they were directed to wear standard officers’ sashes [sharfy] and cartridge pouches [lyadunki]. The sashes were tied over the everyday white girdles [kushaki], while the pouches were of black leather on a crossbelt trimmed with silver galloon, and they had a silver badge, chains, prickers, buckle, prong, endpiece, and rings—all in silver (Illus. 2110). The lid of the pouch was covered with black velvet, and around it was set a silver frame with similarly silver rays in the corners, and in the center it had a silver eight-pointed star with a two-headed eagle (Illus. 2111) (172).

14 and 15 April 1809 –New uniform clothing was confirmed for the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment:

a) For privates – dark-blue caftan coat, scarlet half-caftan, both with a standing collar, slit cuffs, and sewn-on tracery colored red with yellow; dark-blue sharavary pants; epaulettes of the pattern for Guards lancers with tinned brass buttons [mednyya, vyluzhennyya pugovitsy]; white girdle, headdress of black astrakhan, with a red top and white hair plume [sultan] with black and orange at its root; mixed yellow and red cap lines and a black chinstrap, fastened on the right side with a tin button; gray greatcoat with a red tab on the collar and a red strap on the left shoulder (Illus. 2112).

b) For non-commissioned officers – as for privates but with the addition of silver galloon on the collar and cuffs; white cap lines with a mix of black and orange; white plume with black and orange hairs at the top (Illus. 2113).

c) For trumpeters – the same as for non-commissioned officers with the addition of dark-blue wings and sewn-on guards tape: on the chest, wings, sleeves, and all seams. Also, instead of white plumes, they had red (Illus. 2114).

d) For company-grade officers – caftan, half-caftan, and sharavary pants, of the same colors and patterns as described above—the first with the embroidered tracery already in use; silver epaulettes of the pattern for company-grade officers in the rest of the Guards; plume—as for privates; silver cap lines with an admixture of black and orange silk; the previous cartridge pouch except the black velvet replaced by dark blue, and on the star the eagle was gold instead of the previous silver; crossbelt for the pouch, covered with the same velvet, with silver galloon over its entire width, and with likewise silver badge, chains, and prickers (Illus. 2115 and 2116).

e) For field-grade officers – as for company-grade officers except epaulettes had a fringe (Illus. 2115).

f) For generals – as for all officers, but with silver generals’ embroidery along the edges of the collar and cuffs and on the pocket flaps of the caftan coat; epaulettes with thick twisted cord for a fringe; silver cap lines; a plume [cheleng] of white feathers, with black and yellow feathers towards the bottom, as on the shakos and headdresses of Hussar generals (Illus. 2117) (173).

11 September 1811 – The L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment was given forage caps of the same pattern as introduced at this time throughout the Army, but in red with a dark-blue band and piping. Lower ranks additionally had the squadron number on the band, in thin yellow cord (Illus. 2118) (174).

In the beginning of 1812Collars on caftans, half-caftans, and greatcoats were ordered to be lower than before and closed by small hooks. For lower ranks the collars had the straight sewn-on lace prescribed for the entire Guard, and for officers—the previous silver embroidery. Also, the cap cords for privates became completely yellow, and for non-commissioned officers—yellow with multicolored tassels and knots. For officers the cords were completely silver (Illus. 2118 and 2119) (175).

25 April 1813 – The L.-Gds. Black Sea Sotnia, attached to the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment and also known as the L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, was ordered to keep all its existing uniform clothing. In color and pattern, the uniform was like the clothing for the other Cossacks, i.e. Don, of this regiment, but on the half-caftan as well as the caftan, the squadron added to the normal sleeves two more, thrown back. These were red for the half-caftan and dark blue for the caftan. There was another difference in that collars and cuffs in Don squadrons were of red and dark-blue cloth (corresponding to the color of the half-caftan and caftan), trumpeters’ wings were dark blue, and shabracks and saddle pads for all ranks were red with white trim, while in the Black Sea Sotnia collars and cuffs were black (of plissé for lower ranks and velvet for officers), with white piping; wings were red; shabracks dark blue; and saddle pads red with yellow tape for trim (Illus. 2120 and 2121) (176).

20 November 1815 – Field and company-grade officers of all squadrons in the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment, in place of their previous embroidery, were ordered to have silver buttonhole loops [petlitsy] on collars and cuffs (Illus. 2122, 2123, and 2124). Privates and non-commissioned officers [ryadovye i zauryadniki] were given new cartridge pouches, of the same pattern as used by Guards Lancers (Illus. 2125) (177).

11 February 1816 – Instead of black plissé and velvet collars, the L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron was ordered to have these of plain cloth: red for half-caftans and dark blue for caftans. Also, lower ranks were given yellow headdress cords instead of white (Illus. 2123) (178).

3 April 1816 – In the L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, it was ordered that the yellow woolen tape on lower ranks’ shabracks and saddle pads be replaced with trim in white lace, following the example of the other squadrons (179).

16 February 1819 – The L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment was ordered to have covers on headdresses and plumes, closed with small hooks and overlapping on the left side, similar to the shako covers introduced as this time in Dragoon, Hussar, and Horse-Jäger regiments (Illus. 2126) (180).

28 February 1819 – Officers of the L.-Gds. Cossack Regiment were ordered to have sabers of the pattern introduced at this time for officers of the rest of the Guards Light Cavalry, i.e. with a gilt hilt (Illus. 2126) (181).

In 1820Trumpeters’ tape sewn onto half-caftans and caftans began to applied more closely together and around the whole collar (Illus. 2127) (182).

18 August 1825 – The regiment was given round pompons instead of hair plumes. For lower ranks these were of yellow wool, and for officers—silver (Illus. 2128 and 2129) (183).




XXXIX. GUARDS GENDARMES.
[Gvardeiskie zhandarmy.]


27 December 1815 – The newly established Life-Guards Gendarme Half-Squadron was ordered to have the uniforms prescribed for the Gendarme Regiment on 30 August of this year, but with sewn-on yellow Guards tape for lower ranks, yellow epaulettes instead of shoulder straps, and a yellow aiguilette instead of white (Illus. 2130). Officers, in addition to silver buttonhole loops, had embroidered silver edging to the collar, cuff flaps, and cuffs (Illus. 2131 and 2132). Saddle cloths were prescribed to also be as for the Gendarme Regiment, but with two rows of yellow tape (silver galloon for officers), and yellow crowns and monograms for lower ranks, trimmed round with thin red cord (Illus. 2130 and 2131). Accouterments and arms were as for the Guards Dragoons (184).

3 April 1816 – All combatant lower ranks of the half-squadron were ordered to wear blue [svetlosinii] pants for everyday use, matching the color of the coat. They were to put on white pants only for parades, and while on campaign have gray riding trousers with blue stripes and red piping (Illus. 2133) (185).

24 June 1816 – The same personnel were ordered to have slit cuffs without flaps, with two silver buttonhole loops for officers (Illus. 2133) (186).

15 May 1817 – They were also ordered, when in formation or in parades, to be in gloves with gauntlet cuffs, after the manner of Cuirassiers (Illus. 2134) (187).

In 1820 - Trumpeters’ tape began to be sewn on more closely together and around the whole collar (Illus. 2135) (188).

29 March 1825 - For combatant lower ranks, for faultless service, there were established stripes to be sewn on the left sleeve: for 10 years service - one, for 15 years - two, for 20 years - three; one over the other, all of yellow tape (189).




XXXIX. GUARDS TRAIN.
[Gvardeiskii furshtat.]


6 February 1817 – Clothing, accouterments, and weaponry were confirmed for lower ranks of train battalions in the Guards Corps, all according to what was approved on 9 may 1819 for Army Train personnel and already described above, except that on the shako was a Guards pattern badge (Illus. 2136) (190). Officers were given uniforms like those of Army Train officers, but with the Guards badge on the shako and embroidered silver buttonhole loops on the collar and cuffs (Illus. 2137) (191).

25 October 1819 – In order to distinguish between the different Guards Train battalions, lower ranks of the 1st Battalion were ordered to have shoulder straps with red piping, the 2nd Battalion—with white, the 3rd—with green, and the 4th—with no piping (192). This same distinction was also adopted for the piping around the upper edge of the forage cap (193).

15 March 1822 – Guards Train officers were given frock coats, identical to those prescribed for officers of the Army Train (194).

29 March 1825 - For combatant lower ranks, for faultless service, there were established stripes to be sewn on the left sleeve: for 10 years service - one, for 15 years - two, for 20 years - three; one over the other, all of yellow tape (195).



END OF VOLUME FIFTEEN.




NOTES

(1) Complete Collection of Laws [Polnoe Sobranie Zakonov, henceforth PSZ], Vol. XXVI, pg. 609, No 19,826.

(2) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(3) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pt. II, regulation for uniforms, pg. 72, No 19,950.

(4) The Archive of the the War Ministry’s Inspection Department, in the book of orders issued by the Government Military Collegium in 1801.

(5) PSZ Vol. XLIV, Pt. II, sect. 4, regulations for uniforms, pg. 45, No 20,164.

(6) Drawings held in the SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library, catalogued as No 246, and statements by contemporaries.

(7) Ditto.

(8) Ditto.

(9) Highest confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 29 December 1802; drawings located in the SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’S Own Library, catalogued under No 246; various uniforms and other items preserved up to the present time, and statements by contemporaries.

(10) These drum banners are now preserved in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’S Own Arsenal, in the Anichkov Palace.

(11) Undress coats and shabracks with pistol carriers, preserved up to the present time, and statements by contemporaries.

(12) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(13) PSZ Vol. XXVII, pg. 934, No 20,989, and actual helmets preserved up to the present time.

(14) Announcement by the Government Military Collegium to the Military Commission, 6 November 1803.

(15) Highest confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for Cavalier Guards Regiment, 14 March 1804, and statements by contemporaries.

(16) Determination made by the Government Military Collegium, 4 April 1804, and statements by contemporaries.

(17) Statements by contemporaries.

(18) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, and shabracks with pistol carriers preserved up to the present time.

(19) PSZ Vol. XXVII, pg. 887, No 21,651.

(20) Statements by contemporaries.

(21) Report by the St.-Petersburg Commissariat Commission to the Government Military Collegium, 13 March 1806.

(22) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(23) PSZ Vol. XXIX, pg. 21, No 22,382.

(24) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department; uniforms from that time, preserved up to now, and statements by contemporaries.

(25) PSZ Vol. XXX, pg. 45, No 22,784.

(26) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(27) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 13, No 23,373; actual helmets preserved in Arsenals; drawings from that time, and statements by contemporaries.

(28) Statements by contemporaries.

(29) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 13, No 23,386.

(30) Ibid., Vol. XLIV, pg. 13, No 23,548.

(31) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(32) PSZ Vol. XXX, pg. 1006, No. 23,695.

(33) Ibid., Vol. XXXI, pg. 215, No 24,263.

(34) Statements by contemporaries.

(35) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 54, No 24,774.

(36) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 69, No 24,769, and statements by contemporaries.

(37) Statements by contemporaries; contemporary portraits and drawings, and actual items preserved in various Arsenals or in the possession of private persons.

(38) PSZ Vol. XXXII, pg. 454, No 25,262, and statements by contemporaries.

(39) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(40) See above, in Vol. XI, under the description of uniforms for Army Cuirassier regiments, through 3 April 1813.

(41) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 100, Nos 25,489 and 25,490, and statements by contemporaries.

(42) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 133, No 25,565.

(43) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 133, No 25,589, and statements by contemporaries.

(44) Ibid., Vol. XXXII, pg. 876, No 25,644, and statements by contemporaries.

(45) PSZ Vol. XXXII, pg. 906, No 25,670.

(46) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, and statements by contemporaries.

(47) Ditto.

(48) Ditto.

(49) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 134, No 27,770, and model pattern gloves preserved at the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(50) Ibid., Vol. XXXIII, pg. 1029, No 26,441.

(51) Ibid., pg. 543, No 26,192.

(52) HIGHEST Order and statements by contemporaries.

(53) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(54) Ditto.

(55) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 103, No 27,298, and from the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(56) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(57) Statements by contemporaries, and cuirasses preserved up to the present time in various Arsenals.

(58) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, and actual uniform coats preserved up to the present time.

(59) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 100, No 29,140, and from the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(60) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(61) PSZ Vol. XL, pg. 188, No 30,309.

(62) HighestConfirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the L.-Gds. Dragoon Regiment, 12 December 1809; uniforms of that time, preserved up to the present time, and statements by contemporaries.

(63) PSZ Vol. XXXI, pg. 215, No 24,263.

(64) Statements by contemporaries.

(65) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 54, No 24,774, and from the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(66) From the files of the same Department.

(67) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 910, No 24,899.

(68) Statements by contemporaries, and from the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(69) PSZ Vol. XXXII, pg. 454, No 25,262.

(70) Ibid., Vol. XLIV, pg. 50 No 25,278.

(71) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(72) Ditto.

(73) Ditto.

(74) From the files of the same Department.

(75) PSZ Vol. XXIII, pg. 549, No 26,192.

(76) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 101, No 26,727, and actual pouches preserved from that time.

(77) Ibid., pg. 101, No 26,723, and model pattern uniforms preserved at the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(78) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 101, No 26,727.

(79) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(80) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 101, No 27,681.

(81) Order from the Chief of HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’s Main Staff, 28 February 1819, No 15, and actual sabers.

(82) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(83) PSZ Vol. XXXVII, pg. 409, No 28,374.

(84) From the Archive files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(85) Ditto.

(86) Ditto.

(87) PSZ Vol. XL, pg. 188, No 30,309.

(88) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(89) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 101, No 26,611; model pattern uniforms preserved at the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, and statements by contemporaries.

(90) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(91) Ditto, and statements by contemporaries.

(92) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(93) PSZ Vol. XXXIII, pg. 543, No 26,192.

(94) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(95) Ditto.

(96) Ditto, and actual horse-jäger muskets from that time.

(97) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 101, No 27,681.

(98) Order from the Chief of HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’s Main Staff, 28 February 1819, No 15, and actual sabers.

(99) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(100) Ditto.

(101) Ditto.

(102) Ditto.

(103) Ditto.

(104) PSZ Vol. XL, pg. 188, No 30,309.

(105) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(106) Report by the Commissariat Office to the Government Military Collegium, 11 May 1801; memorandum to this Office from the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 23 May 1801, No 2136.

(107) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 72, No 19,950; pg. 61, No 20,169, and pg. 49, No 20,186, and statements by contemporaries.

(108) Highest confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the L.-Gds. Hussar Regiment, 29 December 1802; drawings located in the SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’S Own Library, catalogued under No 246; various uniforms and other contemporary items preserved up to the present time, and statements by contemporaries.

(109) Statements by contemporaries.

(110) Proposal by the General-Intendant to the Commissariat Office, 4 April 1805.

(111) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(112) HIGHEST Order announced to the Military Collegium by the Minister for Military Land Forces, 2 December 1806.

(113) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(114) Ditto.

(115) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 13, No 23,548.

(116) Ibid., pg. 14 No 23,609.

(117) Ibid.

(118) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(119) PSZ Vol. XXX, pg. 1006, No 23,695.

(120) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(121) Ditto.

(122) Ditto.

(123) PSZ Vol. XXXI, pg. 215, No 24,263.

(124) Statements by contemporaries.

(125) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, and statements by contemporaries.

(126) Ditto.

(127) Ditto.

(128) PSZ Vol. XXXII, pg. 454, No 25,262.

(129) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, and statements by contemporaries.

(130) Ditto.

(131) Ditto.

(132) Ditto.

(133) Ditto.

(134) Ditto, and contemporary drawings and uniforms.

(135) PSZ Vol. XXXIII, pg. 543, No 26,192.

(136) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, contemporary drawings; oral statements, and actual items.

(137) Ditto.

(138) Ditto.

(139) Ditto.

(140) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 101, No 27,618.

(141) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department; contemporary drawings and actual shakos.

(142) Order of the Chief of H.I.M. Main Staff, 28 February 1819, No 15, and actual sabers.

(143) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department; statements by contemporaries, and actual items.

(144) Ditto.

(145) Ditto.

(146) Ditto.

(147) PSZ Vol. XL, pg. 188, No 30,309.

(148) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(149) Highest confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the L.-Gds. Lancer Regiment; uniforms, czapka headdresses, and other contemporary items preserved up to the present time, and statements by contemporaries.

(150) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(151) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 57, No 24,883.

(152) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department; actual items from that time, preserved at this Department and in various Arsenals; contemporary portraits, drawings, and statements by contemporaries.

(153) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(154) Ditto.

(156) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, and PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 120, No 25,644.

(157) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 102, No 26,018.

(158) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(159) PSZ Vol. XXXIII, pg. 543, No 26,192.

(160) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department, and statements by contemporaries.

(161) From the files of this Department.

(162) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 104, No 27,298.

(163) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department; statements by contemporaries, and actual items.

(164) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 101, No 27,681.

(165) Order by the Chief of H.I.M. Main Staff, 28 February 1819, No 15, and actual sabers.

(166) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(167) PSZ Vol. XXXVIII, pg. 679, No 29,241.

(168) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(169) Ditto.

(170) PSZ Vol. XL, pg. 188, No 30,309.

(171) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(172) Information extracted from the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department; drawings located in the SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library, catalogued under No 246, and actual pouches preserved up to the present time.

(173) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 14, No 23,581.

(174) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(175) Statements by contemporaries and information extracted from the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(176) Highest Ukase addressed to the Acting Minister of War, 25 April 1813, in the city of Dresden, and information extracted from the files of the.

(177) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 102, No 26,002, and information extracted from the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(178) Highest confirmed pattern uniforms for the L.-Gds. Black Sea Squadron, 11 February 1816.

(179) Highest order announced to the War Minister, 3 April 1816, No 195.

(180) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 102, No 27,681.

(181) Order of the Chief of H.I.M. Main Staff, 28 February 1819, No 15, and actual sabers.

(182) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(183) Ditto.

(184) PSZ Vol. XXXIII, pg. 419, No 26,049; Highestconfirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the L.-Gds. Gendarme Half-Squadron, 24 June 1816, and model examples located in the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(185) Highestorder announced to the Duty General of H.I.M. Main Staff, 3 April 1816, No 193.

(186) The table cited in Note 184.

(187) Order of the Chief of H.I.M. Main Staff, 15 May 1817, No 45.

(188) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(189) PSZ Vol. XL, pg. 188, No 30,309.

(190) Highest confirmed pattern uniforms preserved in the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(191) Contemporary uniform coats and statements by contemporaries.

(192) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 139, No 28,429.

(193) From the files of the War Ministry’s Commissariat Department.

(194) PSZ Vol. XLIV, pg. 139, No 28, 969.

(195) Ibid., Vol. XL, pg. 188, No. 30,309.



END OF NOTES TO VOLUME FIFTEEN.