HISTORICAL DESCRIPTION

OF THE CLOTHING AND ARMS

OF THE RUSSIAN ARMY

 

A.V. VISKOVATOV

Compiled by Highest direction

Saint Petersburg, Military Typography Office, 1841

[TRANSLATED BY MARK CONRAD, 2009]

 

 

VOLUME 9

Guards Infantry, Cavalry, and Artillery; Military Educational Institutions, Irregular and National Troops, Military Administration, Provincial Companies, Retired Personnel, and Orderlies

1796-1801

 *     *     *     *     *     *

Contents

Changes in the uniforms and equipment of the Guards, Military Educational Establishments, Cossack and National forces, various separate commands, and military personnel not part of the Army, from 1796 to 1801:


X. Guards Infantry
XI. Guards Cavalry
XII. Guards Artillery
XIII. Military Educational Establishments
XIV. Irregular Troops
XV. National Troops
XVI. Detachments at various official places and government buildings, and other separate units under the military administration
XVII. State Provincial Companies and Detachments
XVIII. Personnel under the military administration but not part of the army itself
XIX. Retired Personnel.
XX. Orderlies

Flags and Standards:

I. Grenadier, Musketeer, and Garrison Regiments
II. Cuirassier Regiments
III. Dragoon Regiments
IV. Guards
V. Military Educational Establishments
VI. Cossack Hosts
VII. National Troops
VIII. Senate Battalion

Insignia for Distinction




LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

1119. Musketeers. Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments, 1796-1797.

1120. Musketeer Non-Commissioned Officer. Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment, 1796-1797.

1121. Musketeer Drummer. Life-Guards Izmailovskii Regiment, 1796-1797.

1122. Grenadiers. Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments, 1796-1797.

1123. Cap plate and band for Grenadier caps in the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments, 1797-1798.

1124. Drummer and Fifer. Grenadier companies of the Life-Guards Izmailovskii and Semenovskii Regiments, 1796-97.

1125. Musician. Life-Guards Semenovskii Regiment, 1796-1797.

1126. Company-Grade Officers. Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments, 1796-1797.

1127. Musketeer. Life-Guards Izmailovskii Regiment, 1797.

1128. Non-Commissioned Officers. Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii and Semenovskii Regiments, 1797.

1129. Company-Grade Officers. Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii and Izmailovskii Regiments, 1797-1799.

1130. Cap plate for Grenadier caps in the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments, 1798-1799, and medallion [medalion] for officers’ gorgets of the same regiments, 1798-1801.

1131. Cap plate and band for Grenadier caps in the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments, 1799-1801.

1132. Grenadier. Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment, 1800-1801.

1133. Guards Grenadier Caps, 1800. aa. Preobrazhenskii Regiment, bb. Semenovskii Regiment, cc. Izmailovskii Regiment.

1134. Field-Grade Officers of the Life-Guards Izmailovskii and Semenovskii Regiments, 1800-1801, and of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment, 1800.

1135. Officers’ coat embroidery in Life-Guards regiments; a. Preobrazhenskii, 1800; b. Semenovskii, 1800 and 1801; c. Izmailovskii, 1800 and 1801; d. Preobrazhenskii, 1800 and 1801.

1136. Company-Grade Officers. Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment, 1800-1801.

1137. Fifers. Leib-Battalion of the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment, 1800-1801.

1138. Turkish drum, 1800-1801.

1139. Non-Commissioned Officer and Private. Life-Guards Jäger Battalion, 1796-1801.

1140. Staff-Waldhornist and Waldhornist. Life-Guards Jäger Battalion, 1796-1801.

1141. Company-Grade Officer. Life-Guards Jäger Battalion, 1796-1801.

1142. Grenadier and Company-Grade Officer. Life-Guards Garrison Battalion, 1799-1801.

1143. Private. Cavalier Guards Squadrons, 1797.

1144. Non-Commissioned Officer. Cavalier Guards Squadrons, 1797.

1145. Trumpeter. Cavalier Guards Squadrons, 1797.

1146. Officer. Cavalier Guards Squadrons, 1797.

1147. Officer. Cavalier Guards Squadrons, 1797.

1148. Cavalier-Guards Supervest, 1797.

1149. Parts of the horse harness for Cavalier-Guards officers, 1797, 1799, and 1801.

1150. Cavalier-Guards Cuirasses, 1797, 1800, and 1801.

1151-1152. Cavalier-Guards Shishki Helmets, 1797.

1153. Private. Cavalier Guards Corps, 1799-1800. (In everyday uniform.)

1154. Trumpeter and Non-Commissioned Officer. Cavalier Guards Corps, 1799. (In everyday uniform.)

1155. Officers. Cavalier Guards Corps, 1799. (In everyday uniform.)

1156. Officer and Non-Commissioned Officer. Cavalier Guards Corps, 1799. (In parade uniform.)

1157-1158. Cavalier-Guards Helmets [Kaski], 1799.

1159. Private, Non-Commissioned Officer, and Trumpeter. Cavalier Guards Corps, 1799-1800. (In undress coat [vitse-mundir].)

1160. Officer. Cavalier Guards Corps, 1799. (In undress coat [vitse-mundir].)

1161. Cavalier-Guards Supervest, 1800.

1162. Officer. Cavalier Guards Corps, 1800. (In undress coat.)

1163. Private. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1800-1801.

1164. Non-Commissioned Officer and Trumpeter. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1800-1801. (In everyday uniform.)

1165. Officer. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1800-1801.

1166. Officer. Cavalier Guards Regiment, 1800-1801. (In undress coat.)

1167. Private. Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 1796-1801. (1st Squadron.)

1168. Non-Commisioned Officer. Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 1796-1801. (2nd, 3rd, and 4th Squadrons.)

1169. Trumpeter. Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 1796-1801. (5th Squadron.)

1170. Officers. Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 1796-1801. (1st, 2nd and 3rd Squadrons.)

1171. Officers. Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 1796-1801. (4th and 5th Squadrons.)

1172. Officer. Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 1796-1798. (In undress coat.)

1173. Officer. Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 1799. (In undress coat.)

1174. Officers’ embroidery on undress coat, Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 1799. (a. on collar, b. on cuffs.)

1175. Leib-Hussar. 1796-1798. (In parade uniform.)

1176. Non-Commissioned Officers and Trumpeter. Leib-Hussar Regiment, 1796-1798.

1177. Leib-Hussar Officer. 1796-1798. (In parade uniform.)

1178. Leib-Hussar “Panther,” 1796-1801.

1179. Leib-Hussar Officers’ sarsam horse decoration, 1796-1801.

1180. Private and Non-Commissioned Officer. Leib-Hussar Regiment, 1796-1798. (In everyday uniform.)

1181. Officer. Leib-Hussar Regiment, 1796-1798. (In everyday uniform.)

1182. Officer. Leib-Hussar Regiment, 1796-1798. (In vengerka.)

1183. Officer and Private. Leib-Hussar Regiment, 1799.

1184. Officer and Private. Leib-Hussar Regiment, 1800-1801.

1185. Privates. Leib-Cossack Regiment, 1796-1801.

1186. Trumpeter, Non-Commissioned Officer, and Staff-Trumpeter. Leib-Cossack Regiment, 1796-1801.

1187.Officer. Leib-Cossack Regiment, 1796-1801.

1188. Officer and Private. Leib-Cossack Regiment, 1796-1801. (In winter uniform.)

1189. Field-Grade Officer and Fireworker. Life-Guards Artillery Battalion, 1800-1801.

1190. Cadets. 1st Cadet Corps, 1797-1799. (Musketeer and Grenadier.)

1191. Company-Grade Officer. 1st Cadet Corps, 1797-1799.

1192. Cadets. Boys’ Section of the Army (later 1st) Cadet Corps. 1797-1801. (In summer uniform.)

1193. Cadets. Boys’ Section of the Army (later 1st) Cadet Corps. 1797-1801. (In winter uniform.)

1194. Officer and Cadet. 2nd Cadet Corps, 1797-1800.

1195. Cadet. IMPERIAL Military Orphans’ Home, 1798-1801.

1196. Pupil from soldiers’ children. IMPERIAL Military Orphans’ Home, 1798-1801.

1197. Student. Military Orphans’ Sections, 1798-1801.

1198. Company-Grade Officer. IMPERIAL Military Orphans’ Home, 1798-1801.

1199. Cadet and Field-Grade Officer. 1st, 2nd, and Shklov Cadet Corps, 1800-1801.

1200.Private of the 1st, and Officer of the 2nd. Chuguev Regiments, 1798-1800. (In winter uniform.)

1201. Privates. Teptyar Regiments, 1798-1801.

1202. Cossack and Officer. Leib-Ural Sotnia, 1798-1801.

1203. Ranker [sherengovyi]. Lithuanian-Tatar Horse Regiment, 1797-1801.

1204. Non-Commissioned Officer [namestnik] and Comrade [tovarishch]. Lithuanian-Tatar Horse Regiment, 1797-1801. (In summer uniform.)

1205. Officer. Lithuanian-Tatar Horse Regiment, 1797-1801. (In summer uniform.)

1206. Ranker and Comrade. Lithuanian-Tatar Horse Regiment, 1797-1801. (In winter uniform.)

1206a. Non-Commissioned Officer and Officer. Lithuanian-Tatar Horse Regiment, 1797-1801. (In winter uniform.)

1207. Ranker. Polish Horse Regiment, 1797-1801.

1208. Comrade. Polish Horse Regiment, 1797-1801.

1209. Officer and Non-Commissioned Officer. Polish Horse Regiment, 1797-1801.

1210. Non-Commissioned Officer and Private. Balaklava Greek Infantry Battalion, 1797-1830.

1211. Officer. Balaklava Greek Infantry Battalion, 1797-1801.

1212. Musketeer and Company-Grade Officer. Prince de Condé’s French Noble Regiment, 1797-1800.

1213. Company-Grade Officer and Non-Commissioned Officer. Duke de Bourbon’s French Grenadier Regiment, 1797-1800.

1214. Field-Grade Officer. Duke de Hohenlohe’s German Regiment, 1797-1800.

1215. Officer and Private. Duke de Berry’s Noble Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1800.

1216. Non-Commissioned Officer and Officer. Duke d’Enghien’s Dragoon Regiment, 1797-1800.

1217. Feldjäger and Feldjäger Officer. 1797-1801.

1218. Officer in standard Army uniform for Infantry, 1796-1801.

1219. Officer in standard Army uniform for Cavalry, 1796-1801.

1220. Officer. Military Collegium and Commissariat and Provisions Departments, 1797-1801.

1221. Official. Military Collegium and Commissariat and Provisions Departments, 1800-1801.

1222. General-Adjutant and Aide-de-Camp. Infantry, 1796-1801.

1223. Aide-de-Camp and General-Adjutant. Cavalry, 1796-1801.

1224. Flags granted to the Leib-Grenadier Regiment in1797.

1225. Spearhead and tassel with lace strap, established for flags in 1796.

1226. Flags granted to Grenadier regiments: a-b. Pavlovskii, 1797; c-d. Yekaterinoslav, 1798; e-f. St. Petersburg, 1798; g-h. Astrakhan, 1798; i-k. Kiev, 1798; l-m. Moscow, 1798.

1227. Flags granted to Grenadier regiments: a-b. Little Russia, 1798; c-d. Siberia, 1798; e-f. Phanagoria, 1798; g-h. Kherson, 1798; i-k. Taurica, 1798; l-m. Caucasus, 1798.

1228. Flags granted to Musketeer regiments: a-b. Belozersk, 1798; c-d. Nasheburg, 1797; e-f. Chernigov, 1798; g-h. New Ingermanland, 1798; i-k. Yaroslavl, 1797; l-m. Caucasus, 1798; n-o. Smolensk, 1798; p-q. Ryazhsk, 1797.

1229. Flags granted to Musketeer regiments: a-b. Kursk, 1798; c-d. Kozlov, 1797; e-f. Sevastopol, 1799; g-h. Belev, 1799; i-k. Aleksopol, 1798; l-m. Schlüsselburg, 1798; n-o. Bryansk, 1798; p-q. Troitsk, 1799.

1230. Flags granted to Musketeer regiments: a-b. Ladoga, 1798; c-d. Polotsk, 1798; e-f. Archangel, 1798; g-h. Old Ingermanland, 1797; i-k. Novgorod, 1798; l-m. Nizhnii-Novgorod, 1798; n-o. Vitebsk, 1799; p-q. Azov, 1798.

1231. Flags granted to Musketeer regiments: a-b. Orel, 1798; c-d. Reval, 1798; e-f. Tula, 1797; g-h. Yelets, 1798; i-k. Pskov, 1797; l-m. Tambov, 1797; n-o. Rostov, 1798; p-q. Murom, 1797.

1232. Flags granted to Musketeer regiments: a-b. Staryi Oskol, 1797; c-d. Tobolsk, 1798; e-f. Tiflis, 1799; g-h. Voronezh, 1798; i-k. Kazan, 1799; l-m. Moscow, 1798; n-o. Kabarda, 1799; p-q. Vladimir, 1798.

1233. Flags granted to Musketeer regiments: a-b. Uglich, 1798; c-d. Sevsk, 1798; e-f. Narva, 1798; g-h. Dnieper, 1798; i-k. Vyatka, 1798; l-m. Suzdal, 1799; n-o. Kexholm, 1797; p-q. Viborg, 1798.

1234. Flags granted to Musketeer regiments: a-b. Ryazan, 1798; c-d. Neva, 1798; e-f. Velikie Luki, 1797; g-h. Sofiya, 1798; i-k. Shirvan, 1799; l-m. Perm, 1798; n-o. Nizovsk, 1798; p-q. Butyrsk, 1798.

1235. Flags granted to Musketeer regiments: a-b. Ufa, 1798; c-d. Rylsk, 1798; e-f. Yekaterinburg, 1798; g-h. Selenginsk, 1799; i-k. Tomsk, 1799; l-m. Arkharov’s, 1797.

1236. Flags granted to Musketeer regiments: a-b. Pavlutskii’s, 1799; c-d. Leitern’s, 1799; e-f. Brant’s, 1799; g-h. Müller 1st’s, 1799; i-k. Marklovskii’s 1st’s, 1799; l-m. Berg’s, 1799.

1237. Flags granted to Garrison regiments: a-b. St. Petersburg, 1797; c-d. Moscow, 1798; e-f. Viborg, 1798; g-h. Fredrikshamn, 1798; i-k. Reval, 1798; l-m. Riga, 1798; n-o. Archangel, 1799; p-q. Kazan, 1798.

1238. Flags granted to Garrison regiments: a-b. Orenburg, 1798; c-d. Tobolsk, 1799; e-f. Smolensk, 1799; g-h. Selenginsk, 1799; i-k. Kiev, 1798; l-m. Taganrog, 1799; n-o. Baltic, 1799; p-q. Dünamünde, 1799.

1239. Flags granted to Garrison regiments: a-b. Irkutsk, 1799; c-d. Kronstadt, 1798; e-f. Narva, 1798; g-h. Yelisavetgrad, 1798; i-k. Dmitrii, 1799; l-m. Azov, 1798; n-o. Omsk, 1799; p-q. Astrakhan, 1799.

1240. Flags granted to Garrison regiments: a-b. Tsaritsyn, 1799; c-d. Kizlyar, 1799; e-f. Schlüsselburg, 1799; g-h. Villmanstrand, 1798; i-k. Kexholm, 1798; l-m. Nyslot, 1798; n-o. Arensburg, 1799; p-q. Pernau, 1799.

1241. Flags granted to Garrison regiments: a-b. Bakhmut, 1799; c-d. Tambov, 1799; e-f. Voronezh, 1798; g-h. Vladimr, 1798; i-k. Simbirsk, 1799; l-m. Nizhnii-Novgorod, 1797; n-o. Novgorod, 1798; p-q. Tver, 1797.

1242. Flags granted to Garrison regiments: a-b. Aleksandrovsk, 1799; c-d. Sudak, 1799; e-f. Petrovsk, 1799; g-h. Balaklava, 1799; i-k. Perekop, 1799; l-m. Stavropol, 1799; n-o. Orsk [n.d.]. p-q. Kizilsk, 1799.

1243. Flags granted to Garrison regiments: a-b. Verkhneuralsk, 1799; c-d. Troitsk, 1799; e-f. Zverinogolovsk, 1799; g-h. Pskov, 1799; i-k. Dünaburg, 1799; l-m. Vitebsk, 1799; n-o. Polotsk, 1798; p-q. Rogachev, 1799.

1244. Flags granted to Garrison regiments: a-b. Staryi-Bykhov, 1799; c-d. Tomsk, 1799; e-f. Semipalatinsk, 1799; g-h. Biisk, 1799; i-k. Petropavlovsk, 1799; l-m. Mozdok, 1799.

1245. Flags granted to Garrison regiments: a-b. Saratov, 1798; c-d. Rochensalm, 1798; e-f. Sevastopol, 1798; g-h. Nikolaev, 1798; i-k. Niznhii-Kamchatka, 1799.

1246. Flags established in 1800 for Army and Garrison regiments of the Lifland, Lithuania, Smolensk, and Brest Inspectorates.

1247. Flags established in 1800 for Army and Garrison regiments: a-b. Regiments of the Ukraine, Dniester, Crimea, and Caucasus Inspectorates; c-d. Finland Inspectorate; e-f. Orenburg and Siberia Inspectorates; g-h. St.-Peterburg and Moscow Inspectorates.

1248. Flag granted to the Taurica Grenadier Regiment, 30 March 1800.

1249. Standards granted to His Majesty’s Leib-Cuirassier Regiment, 25 June 1798.

1250. Standards granted to Cuirassier regiments: a-b. Her Majesty’s, 1798; c-d. Military Order, 1798; e-f. Yekaterinoslav, 1798; g-h. Kazan, 1798; i-k. Ryazan, 1798; l-m. Yamburg, 1798.

1251. Standards granted to Cuirassier regiments: a-b. Glukhov, 1798; c-d. Kiev, 1798; e-f. Nezhin, 1798; g-h. Sofiya, 1798; i-k. Starodub, 1798; l-m. Chernigov, 1798.

1252. Standards granted to Cuirassier regiments: a-b. Riga, 1798; c-d. Kharkov, 1798; e-f. Little Russia, 1798; g-h. Friderici’s, 1799; i-k. Neplyuev’s, 1798; l-m. Zorn’s, 1799.

1253. Standards granted to the Vladimir Dragoon Regiment, 21 January 1799.

1254. Standards granted to Dragoon regiments: a-b. Astrakhan, 1797; c-d. Nizhnii-Novgorod, 1799; e-f. Pskov, 1798; g-h. St. Petersburg, 1798; i-k. Smolensk, 1798; l-m. Taganrog, 1799.

1255. Standards granted to Dragoon regiments: a-b. Irkutsk, 1797; c-d. Orenburg, 1797; e-f. Sibieria, 1797; g-h. Ingermanland, 1798; i-k. Narva, 1799; l-m. Rostov, 1798.

1256. Standards granted to Dragoon regiments: a-b. Moscow, 1798; c-d. Seversk, 1798; e-f. Kargopol, 1798; g-h. Schreider’s, 1799; i-k. Khastatov’s, 1799.

1257. Standards granted in 1800 to the Dragoon Regiments of Skalon, Pushkin, and Obrezkov.

1258. Flags granted to Life-Guards regiments in December 1796. a. Preobrazhenskii, b. Semenovskii, c. Izmailovskii. Note: These flags were granted without Maltese crosses, which were sewn on later, in 1798.

1259. Flags granted to Chef battalions in the Life Guards, 2 January 1798. a. Preobrazhenskii, b. Semenovskii, c. Izmailovskii.

1260. Flags granted to Chef battalions in the Life Guards, 2 January 1798. a. Preobrazhenskii, b. Semenovskii, c. Izmailovskii.

1261. Flags granted to Life-Guards regiments, 7 January 1799. a. Preobrazhenskii, b. Semenovskii, c. Izmailovskii.

1262. Flags granted to Life-Guards regiments, 7 January 1799. a. Preobrazhenskii, b. Semenovskii, c. Izmailovskii.

1263. Flags intended for the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments, 1800.

1264. Cavalier-Guards Standards. a. Cavalier Guards Corps, granted in 1799; b. Cavalier Guards Regiment, granted in 1800; c. Cavalier Guards Regiment, granted in 1800.

1265. Standards granted to Life-Guards regiments: a-b. Horse, 1796; c-d. Horse, 1798; e-f. Horse, 1799; g-h. Cossack, 1799.

1266. Flags granted to the Army (later 1st) Cadet Corps, 2 November 1798.

1267. Flag granted to the Ural Host, 19 April 1798.

1268. Flags granted to Cossack troops: a. 1st Chuguev Regiment, 10 August 1798; b. 2nd Chuguev Regiment, 10 August 1798; c. Leib-Ural Sotnia, 4 January 1799.

1269. Flag granted to the Don Host, 15 February 1800.

1270. Flags granted to Horse regiments, 15 September 1798: a-b. Lithuanian, Tatar; c-d. Polish.

1271. Flags and standards granted to regiments in the Prince de Condé’s Corps, 15 January 1798: a-b. Prince de Condé’s French Noble Regiment; c-d. Duke de Bourbon’s Grenadier Regiment; e-f. Duke de Hohenlohe’s German Regiment; g-h. Duke de Berry’s Noble Dragoon Regiment; i-k. Duke d’Enghien’s Dragoon Regiment.

1272. Flags granted to the Senate Battalion in 1799.

1273. Medals instituted for award to lower military ranks for twenty years’ service without reproach. a. St. Anne, 12 November 1796; b. Donative of St. John of Jerusalem, 10 October 1800.


X. GUARDS INFANTRY
[GVARDEISKAYA PEKHOTA]


The changes introduced by Emperor Paul I in the uniforms and armament of Army Infantry were also applied to the Guards Infantry, which consisted, as stated above, of three regiments: Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii, and of two battalions: Jäger and Garrison.

From 6 November 1796, when EMPEROR PAUL I ascended to the throne, to 3 December 1797 the musketeers [mushketery] of all three Life-Guards regiments wore a dark-green coat [kaftan] with fold-down collar: of red cloth in the Preobrazhenskii Regiment, blue [sinii] in the Semenovskii, and dark green in the Izmailovskii; with round or sewn [kruglyi ili sshivnyi] cuffs of red cloth, with lining of red kersey, and brass buttons. Vest [kamzol] and breeches [shtany] were white; everyday gaiters [vsednevnyya shtiblety] of black cloth, and white linen for parade dress; blunt-toed shoes; red neckcloth with white trim; hat with likewise white trim, a brass button, and three green tassels with their centers the color of the collar (Illus. 1119). Dark-green forage cap [furazhnaya shapka] with a red band or none, with trim in the color of the collar and a tassel in the company color, as for regiments of Army Infantry. Greatcoat [shinel’] of dark-green cloth, with similar cinch, buttons, and fold-down collar. Warm coat [fufaika] for winter, of sheepskin. Weapons and accouterments, consisting of a rapier [shpaga] with a short-sword blade [tesachnyi klinok] and sword knot [temlyak], sword belt [portupeya], musket, frizzen cover [polunagalishche], cartridge pouch [patronnaya suma], knapsack [ranets], water flask [vodonosnaya flyazhka], and pouch for rusk [sukharnyi meshok], were all exactly like those for army musketeers.

Besides the color of the collar, regiments were distinguished one from the other by the color of the button loops [petlitsy] and tassels on the cuff flaps. These button loops were: Preobrazhenskii Regiment—yellow, with two red stripes; Semenovskii—yellow, with blue stripes; Izmailovskii—also yellow, with green stripes. There were also regimental differences in hair styles: in the first of these regiments the hair on the temple was gathered into three curls, in the second—into two, and in the third—into one (Illus. 1119) (1).

Non-commissioned officers in Musketeer companies had the same uniforms and weapons as private musketeers, but were distinguished from them in that: they had no shoulder straps on their coats; their hats had gold galloon; hat tassels and the ring around the sword knot were in three colors: white, orange, and black; white gloves with gauntlet cuffs; canes; and halberds [alebardy] instead of muskets. In the Izmailovskii Regiment these last items were the same as in the Army, but in the Preobrazhenskii and Semenovskii they were of a somewhat different pattern, like army officers’ spontoons, with a spear point and socket 8 vershoks [14 inches] long (Illus. 1120) (2) and (3).

Drummers in Musketeer companies had the same uniform as private musketeers but were distinguished by swallows’ nests [kryltsy] on the shoulders and chevrons [nashivki] sewn onto the sleeves, with the first item being the same color as the button loops on the cuff flaps and the tassels (Illus. 1121). Weapons, accouterments, and drums were the same as for army drummers, while drumsticks [barabannyya palki] were the same color as halberd shafts (4).

Privates in Grenadier companies—forming special Combined battalions [Svodnye bataliony] since 25 January 1797—were distinguished from musketeers in exactly the same way as in army regiments, but the front plate of the cap was gilded. The band was of gilded brass [iz mednoi, vyzolochennoi latuni] with three raised images of grenades and supports, and with dark-green cloth lining on the upper edge, while trim was narrow gold galloon with black silk. In the lower part of the cap plate the image of the Keizer-flag was colored with its prescribed red, blue, and white. On the sides of the plate, above the Keizer-flag, there was a single standard on the right, colored white, and on another, red, on the left, and on bother there was the Emperor’s monogram in black paint. The rear sections of the caps were as in the Army, of cloth: red in the Preobrazhenskii Regiments; blue in the Semenovskii; and white in the Izmailovskii (Illus. 1122 and 1123) (5).

Master craftsmen on the establishment [frontovye masterovye] who were with the Grenadier companies were clothed and armed the same as grenadiers, but with the addition of an ax and leather apron [kozhanyi perednik ili zapon], colored, just as the ax carrier [toporishche], the same as halberd shafts (6).

Non-commissioned officers, drummers, and fifers in Grenadier companies, as well as regimental drummers and musicians (1 for a bassoon [faggot], 2 for clarinets [klarnety], and 2 for French horns [Waldhorns, valtorny]) were distinguished from the above lower combatant ranks by the same distinctions as prescribed in Army Musketeer regiments, as already described in detail above under the section for Army Infantry uniforms (Illus. 1124 and 1125) (7).

Company and field-grade officers and generals in Guards Infantry regiments were distinguished from lower ranks in the same way as in the Army Infantry, but with the addition of a gold tassel on the hat, after the example of officers of the Leib-Grenadier Regiment, mentioned above. In regard to colors, cuffs for all guards infantry regiment officers were of dark-green cloth; button loops on cuff flaps were embroidered in gold with a mixture of silk—red, sky blue, or green according to the regiment, with small tassels. As for collars, they were of red cloth in the Preobrazhenskii Regiment, of blue [sinii] velvet in the Semenovskii, and of dark-green cloth in the Izmailovskii (Illus. 1126). In addition, officers of the Semenovskii Regiment had gold aiguillettes [aksel’banty]. Like the lower ranks, officers of all three regiments wore black gaiters for everyday use and white in parades. The shafts of their spontoons [espantony] were the same as for halberds (8).

Noncombatant lower ranks: chaplain’s assistants [tserkovniki], medics [fel’dshery], gunstock makers [lozhniki], the gunsmith [ruzheinyi master], the gunstock maker’s andgunsmith’s apprentices [ucheniki], farrier [konoval], blacksmiths [kuznetsy], carpenter [plotnik], provost [profos], train personnel [furleity], and also from 1797 the wagon master [vagenmeister] were all prescribed the same uniforms as these ranks had in Army Infantry regiments (9).

Noncombatant officers: quartermasters [kvartermistry], legal experts [auditory], and doctors [lekarya] also had the same uniforms as quartermaster, legal assistants, and doctors in the Army Infantry (10).

3 January 1797 – The inscription “1700 No 19” on company-grade officers’ gorgets in the Preobrazhenskii and Semenovskii regiments, as granted by EMPEROR PETR I, is removed (11).

3 December 1797 – When the foot regiments of the Life-Guards were organized as: Preobrazhenskii—one Grenadier and three Musketeer battalions, and the Semenovskii and Izmailovskii—one Grenadier and two Musketeer battalions, the uniforms of these regiments underwent the following changes:

1) The wide fall-down collar on coats in the Izmailovskii Regiment were changed to narrow and standing (Illus. 1127, 1128, and 1129).

2) All combatant ranks of the three regiments were ordered to have slit cuffs, black neckcloths, and gold button loops on the collar and cuffs. The button loops had stripes (red, blue, and green, by regiment) and tassels: of galloon for lower ranks and embroidered for officers (Illus. 1127, 1128, and 1129)(12).

3) Officers were given red cuffs instead of dark green, and hats with wide toothed gold galloon, a cockade, and a button loop, i.e. similar to those for generals but without plumage on the edges. Also, officers of the Preobrazhenskii and Izmailovskii, to make them the same as in the Semenovskii, were given gold aiguillettes (Illus. 1129) (13).

4 December 1797 – With the reorganization of the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment into two Grenadier and three Musketeer battalions, in the first Grenadier battalion, or Leib-Battalion, the backs of caps were directed to be yellow, and in the second Grenadier battalion—red. In this same year, officers and lower ranks of the Izmailovskii Regiment had their curls cut off (14).

2 January 1798 – In the Leib-Battalion of the Izmailovskii Regiment the shafts of halberds and spontoons were ordered to be coffee colored [kofeinyi], the same color as the flag poles (15).

16 December 1798 – Upon the occasion of EMPEROR PAUL I assuming the title of Grand Master of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, it was ordered that on the front plates of grenadier caps the image of the Keizer-flag be replaced by a white cross on a red field (Illus. 1130a), and following this there be added to the medallions on officers’ gorgets the white cross of St. John of Jerusalem, surrounded by a gold border and topped by a gold crown (Illus. 1130b) (16).

6 January 1799 – In the second and third battalions of the Semenovskii Regiment the shafts of halberds and spontoons were ordered to be white, and in the same battalions of the Izmailovskii Regiment—black. In the first battalions of these regiments and in all the battalions of the Preobrazhenskii, they were coffee-colored, as before. Later these colors changed once more, namely—in the Leib-Battalion of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment the shafts were coffee, and in the other battalions—yellow; in the Semenovskii—black; in the Izmailovskii—white (17).

10 August 1799 – Guards grenadier caps were given plates of a new pattern, of the same size as before but with a large black two-headed eagle on whose breast was a white cross on a raspberry shield with a gold edge. On the upper part of the plate, between the crown and the eagle, is EMPEROR PAUL I’s monogram, and above the crown the word “Blagodat” [“Blessed”] in raised Cyrillic letters. The very same eagle and inscription are stamped at the read of the headband, and the band itself is somewhat changed and larger than before (Illus. 1131)(18). Along with this the yellow color for the rear of grenadier caps in the First, or Leib, Battalion of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment was replaced by raspberry, while the red of the Second Battalion—by yellow (19).

9 October 1799 – The top of the knot on officers’ sashes and the top of their sword knots, and the tops of hat tassels, as well as of lower ranks’ sword knots, were ordered to be raspberry. The stripes on sashes and the tassels of hats, sword knots, and sashes were to be tricolored: black, orange, and raspberry (20).

March 1800 – When the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment was organized into five battalions, and the Semenovskii and Izmailovskii into three Grenadier battalions, all of these regiments were ordered to have:

1) Lower combatant ranks – cuffs round instead of slit; no buttons on the cuffs, but above them on the flaps; red neckcloth with white trim (Illus. 1132) (21).

In the First, or Leib, Battalion of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment – red backs to the grenadier caps, plates and cap bands of gilded brass, with painted eagles as established on 10 August 1799, white tuft (Illus. 1133a); in the Second Battalion – yellow backs to the caps, plates and cap bands the same as in the preceding battalion, red tuft (Illus. 1133b); in the Third – red backs to the caps, brass plates with unpainted eagles, cap band of blue cloth, with three grenades, blue tuft (Illus. 1133c); in the Fourth – red backs to the caps, plates with painted eagles, cap band of yellow cloth, with three grenades, yellow tuft (Illus. 1133d); in the Fifth – red backs to the caps, plates with unpainted eagles, cap band of dark-green cloth, with three gilded grenades, dark-green tuft (Illus. 1133e); in the Leib-Battalion of the Semenovskii Regiment – blue backs to the caps, plate and cap band of gilded brass, with a painted eagle as in the Leib-Battalion of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment, white tuft with a blue center (Illus. 1133f); in the Second – blue backs to the caps, plate with an unpainted eagle, white cap band, with three grenades, white tuft with a blue center (Illus. 1133g); in the Third – blue backs to the caps, plate with an unpainted eagle, red cap band, with three grenades, red tuft with a blue center (Illus. 1133h); in the Leib-Battalion of the Izmailovskii Regiment – white backs to the caps, plate and cap band of gilded brass, with a painted eagle as in the Leib-Battalions of the Preobrazhenskii and Semenovskii regiments, white tuft with a green center (Illus. 1133i); in the Second – white backs to the caps, plate with an unpainted eagle, dark-green cap band, with three grenades, white tuft with a green center (Illus. 1133k); in the Third – white backs to the caps, plate with an unpainted eagle, dark-green cap band, with three grenades, red tuft with a green center (Illus. 1133l). As previously, trim on the gilded plates was gold with black silk, and on brass plates—yellow worsted, with black (22).

3) For officers of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment – coats with narrow fold-down red collars, red lapels and slit cuffs, with gold embroidery along the edges of the lapels, cuffs, and cuff flaps, across the lapels and flaps above the cuffs, and on the waistline (Illus. 1134 and 1135, a) (23).

4) For officers of the Semenovskii and Izmailovskii regiments – coats with round cuffs and gold embroidery on the collar, down the front opening, on the cuffs, cuff flaps, and waistline (Illus. 1134 and 1135, b and c) (24).

5) For officers of all three regiments – white neckcloths, hats with narrow gold galloon and a tassel, without a cockade or button loops (Illus. 1135) (25).

At the end of 1800, officers of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment were ordered to have embroidery of a new pattern, with tassels exactly like those prescribed for officers of the Semenovskii and Izmailovskii regiments, and round cuffs (Illus. 1135d and 1136) (26).

At the same time there was a change in the uniforms for fifers in the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment. They were given dark-green cloth coats with red collar, cuffs, and lining, the skirts turned up a little, gold galloon on all seams, and a wide belt of red stamin [stamed], sewn so that in front it was flat when fastened and in back gathered into a bow with two hanging ends. Also, instead of hats, they received red cloth caps wound at the bottom with white linen in the style of a Turkish chalma, or turban, and decorated with a white plume similar to those used by hussar generals at the time. This plume was inserted into a tube fixed to the front of the cap and covered with a elongated convex gilded plate (Illus. 1137) (27).

When in formation, one of the regimental musicians carried a Turkish drum [Turetskii baraban] as introduced into Russia at the time, painted in red and black checks with white edging between them (Illus. 1138). Both in height and in diameter this drum measured 14 vershoks [24 1/2 inches] (28).

Life-Guards Jäger Battalion: privates, non-commissioned officers, waldhornists, staff-waldhornists, field and company-grade officers, a general, and all noncombatants, during the whole of EMPEROR PAUL I’s reign had uniforms and armaments that were exactly the same as for army jägers. The collar, cuffs, and aiguillette for this battalion’s lower ranks were light orange, and buttons were yellow (Illus. 1139). For waldhornists – lace chevrons, the lace being gold with red tracery (Illus. 1140). For officers – aiguillettes, and gold galloon on the hat (Illus. 1141) (29).

Life-Guards Garrison Battalion: grenadiers, non-commissioned officers, company and battalion drummers, fifers, musicians (1 for the bassoon, 2 for clarinets, and 2 for the French horn, or waldhorn), and noncombatants such as lazaret attendants, medics, gunstock maker, metal smith, and—ranked as an officer—the doctor, had, for the whole of EMPEROR PAUL I’s reign since the establishment of this battalion on 29 July 1799, uniforms, accouterments, and weapons like those confirmed for the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment on 3 and 16 December 1797, but without button loops and with the following changes: white buttons instead of white, silver plates on the grenadier caps instead of gilded, and silver officers’ aiguillettes instead of gold (Illus. 1142) (40). The orders of 10 August and 9 October 1799 regarding new plates for grenadier caps and the addition of raspberry coloring to hat tassels, sword knots, and sashes were extended with equal force to the Life-Guards Garrison Battalion (31). The backs of grenadier caps in this battalion were dark green and the trim was silk—silver with black, and the tuft was blue [sinii] with a yellow center (Illus. 1142) (32).


XI. GUARDS CAVALRY

[GVARDEISKAYA KAVALERIYA]


With the ascension of EMPEROR PAUL I to the Throne, the Cavalier Guards Corps, established in 1762, kept the same uniform clothing and weapons that it had during the preceding reign, up to its disbandment on 6 December 1796.

The new Cavalier Guards Corps, first formed as a single squadron on 11 November 1796 and later reorganized as two and then three squadrons—existing in this last form until 30 October 1797 under the title of Cavalier Guards squadrons—received uniforms and weapons of the patterns established by EMPEROR PAUL I for Cuirassier regiments.

Chevalier Guards privates [ryadovye kavalergardy] had: kolet coat of white kersey with red cloth collar and cuffs, with trim down the front and on the skirts of three-stripe lace— silver in the center and red along the sides—and with silver galloon on the collar and cuffs; vest [kamzol] of red cloth with the same trim as on the coat; hat [shlyapa] with tassels of silver and red silk [iz serebra and krasnago shelka, i.e. silver is a noun, not an adjective like “red” – M.C.]; red cloth cover to the sabertache, with straight silver galloon along th edges, and with a white star in the center, after the example of the stars on the sabertaches of the two Leib-Cuirassier regiments; red girdle [kushak]; broadsword [palash], with a silvered hilt, steel scabbard, and black silk sword knot with a silver tassel; carbine with deerskin strap trimmed on its upper surface with silver galloon; cartridge pouch [lyadunka] with silvered badge; cross strap [pogonnaya perevyaz’] and cartridge-pouch strap [lyadunochnyi remen’], trimmed with red cloth and—in the the center—silver galloon; shabrack [cheprak] and pistol carriers [chushki] of red cloth with narrow silver galloon along the edges, and with the same stars as on the sabertache. All other items were the same as for cuirassiers (Illus. 1143) (33).

Non-commissioned officers [unter-ofitsery], including officer candidates [estandart-yunkera], had a mix of black and orange silk in the tassels of their hats and sword knots, and the top of their plumes were a mix of black and orange feathers. Also, they did not wear cartridge pouches (Illus. 1444) (34).

Trumpeters,staff-trumpeters, andthe kettledrummer [trubachi, shtab-trubachi i litavrshchik], in addition to the same distinctions as these ranks had in Cuirassier regiments, had silver lace with red edging sewn on their clothing (Illus. 1145) (35).

Officers wore coats with wide toothed silver galloon and waistcoats with narrow flat-edge silver galloon. They had wide silver galloon with a fringe on their shabracks and pistol carriers, and similarly silver stars (Illus. 1146) (36).

Non-combatant lower ranks: chaplain’s assistants, medics, barbers, clerks, gunstock makers and gunsmith, saddle maker and his apprentices, tub mender [“fanshmit” – c.f German Wanne meaning “tub” – M.C. ], metalsmiths, blacksmiths, farriers, carpenters, provost, train personnel, and also the stablemaster, quartermaster, legal expert (auditor), and doctor, were uniformed like the corresponding ranks in Cuirassier regiments (37).

On parade, all combatant ranks, officers as well as lower ranks, wore black supervests [supervesty] with toothed white shoulder pieces and red trim along which was sewn silver cord (Illus. 1147 and 1148). For lower ranks these supervests were of cloth with worsted velvet [tripovyi] trim, and for officers both the vest and trim were velvet [barkhatnyi]. Furthermore, in parade uniform, all straps of officers’ horse furniture were trimmed with red worsted velvet, and on the trim were thin gold cords. Buckles, fastenings, fixtures, and all decorative bosses were gilded (Illus. 1149) (38).

At EMPEROR PAUL I’s coronation and some other ceremonial occasions at the HIGHEST COURT, cavalier guards wore armor plates [laty] over their supervests, two skirt-like attachments [poly] on the front one of these; silver gauntlets [naruchniki] and thigh pieces [nabedrenniki]; silver shishak helmets and white knightly sashes [sharfy] over the right shoulder. The armor plates consisted of two halves: a front or breast plate, and a back plate, with a black two-headed eagle on whose breast was a red shield with gold edges. On the shield was an image of St. George with gold crown, beak, claws, scepter, and orb. There were gilded rivets and red worsted velvet trim (velvet for officers) (Illus. 1150). The component parts of the skirts, gauntlets, and thigh pieces were held together by gilt rivets. Theshishak helmets had red ostrich feathers for lower ranks and white for officers, and a gilt eagle and rivets (Illus. 1151 and 1152). Lower ranks’ sashes had a white fringe, while those of officers had a silver fringe (39).

6 April 1799 – The Cavalier Guards Corps, newly established as a personal Guard for the Grand Master of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, was given uniforms of the same pattern as those described above for Cavalier Guard squadrons, but with kolet coats with black plissé collar, cuffs, and trim on the small skirts, and with gold galloon. Waistcoats were of black cloth without galloon. Hats had two silk cockades, one laid on top of the other: the smaller was of white ribbon with a red edge, while the larger was of black with orange edging; gold buttonhole loop, button, and tassels; a plume of white feathers, red at the base. Girdles [kushaki] of raspberry stamin, with a fringe. Sabertache cover of black plissé, with gold galloon around the edges and a likewise gold embroidered crown, and with a similarly embroidered silver cross of St. John of Jerusalem. This cross was also on the hat’s buttonhole loop and button. All straps for the sword belt and sabertache were of red morocco and picked out along the edges with white thread, while the carbine strap was of red Russian leather. Broadswords and sword knots were the same as in 1797. The crossbelt had a gilt buckle, fastener, and end piece, an iron hook, and trim in the form of three raspberry worsted velvet stripes and two gold stripes. The pouch had a brass star with a silver cross of the order on it. The pouch belt was trimmed along its edges with raspberry worsted velvet and down its middle with gold galloon. The shabrack and pistol holders were of white cloth with gold galloon and silver embroidered stars under gold crowns (Illus. 1153) (40).

Noncommissioned officers had the same uniforms as private cavalier guardsmen but with silver tassels on the hat. In regard to weaponry there were the same differences as described above for cavalier guards in 1797 (Illus. 1154) (41).

The coats of trumpeters and the kettledrummer and the swallows’ nests customary for these ranks, trimmed with gold galloon. Hats had red worsted tassels and red hair trim [krasnyi, volosyanoi plyumazh]. Sword knots of red morocco, with a red worsted tassel (Illus. 1154). Trumpets and kettledrums were silver, the latter with gold tassels (42).

Officers had the same distinctions compared to private cavalier guardsmen as in 1797, but with the addition of wide toothed galloon and white plumage trim on their hats, and with the usual silver officers’ sashes exchanged for gold ones with raspberry silk and silver stripes along the edges, in which was inserted orange and black silk (Illus. 1155) (43).

In parade order, cavalier guardsmen, their noncommissioned officers, trumpeters, and the kettledrummer all wore supervests of raspberry worsted velvet, with the cross of the order of St. John of Jerusalem made from white Manchester cloth, and with silver galloon along the edges (Illus. 1156). Officers’ supervests were velvet with a silver cross (Illus. 1156)(44).

During grand ceremonies [bol’shiya torzhestva], all combatant ranks of the Cavalier Guards Corps wore black lacquered helmets [kaski] with gilt visor, eagle, comb, and rivets, and with ostrich feathers: red for lower ranks and white for officers (Illus. 1157 and 1158). Along with the helmets, order sashes [ordenskie sharfy] were worn over the right shoulder, of raspberry silk with a fringe that for lower ranks was again raspberry, but for officers—gold. Swordknots were also raspberry (45).

When off duty, cavalier guardsmen and non-commissioned officers wore an undress uniform [vitse-mundir] consisting of a red cloth coat [kaftan] cut in dragoon style, with collar, lapels, and cuffs of black plissé. It had white lining and the same buttons as on the hat, and was worn with a gold aiguilette on the right shoulder and a gold epaulette on the left. With this was worn white waistcoats and broadswords with scabbards in the pattern for dragoons, with a silver sword knot, while an infantry-style swordbelt with frog was worn under the waistcoat (Illus. 1159) (46).

The undress coat for trumpeters was similar to that for cavalier guardsmen but with swallows’ nests and raspberry and black worsted tape [bason] sewn on in the same manner as on the coats of dragoon trumpeters (Illus. 1159) (47).

The kettledrummer’s undress coat was the same as for trumpeters, but without swallows’ nests (48).

Officers had an undress coat with velvet collar, lapels, and cuffs, and were further distinguished from plain cavalier guardsmen in that their hats had galloon and plumage trim (Illus. 1160) (49).

Besides the uniforms described above, all lower combatant ranks of the Cavalier Guards Corps were prescribed dark-green cloth frock coats [sertuki] and greatcoats [shineli]. The first had a black plissé collar while the latter’s was of red cloth. Officers also wore dark-green frock coats, but with collars of black velvet (50).

Non-combatant ranks: medics, clerks, gunsmith and metal smith, saddle maker, farrier, and also the stablemaster and staff-doctor—all kept the previous uniforms as used throughout the cavalry (51).

In the beginning of the year 1800, all ranks in the Cavalier Guards Corps were wearing supervests with an order cross to which was added embroidered gold lilies (Illus. 1161). At this time undress coats had their lapels and gold aiguilettes removed, and the buttons were changed to silver (Illus. 1162) (52).

From 15 May 1800, when the Cavalier Guards Corps was reorganized into the three-squadron Cavalier Guards Regiment, its ranks were given the following uniform clothing, which was kept by them during the entire remainder of EMPEROR PAUL I’s reign:

Cavalier guardsmenkolet coat, of straw-colored kersey, with red cloth collar, cuffs, trim along the front opening and skirts, and shoulder straps, all trimed with raspberry and black wool tape. Two buttonhole loops of this same tape were on each cuff; waistcoat – of red cloth, also with tape; hat and supervest – of the same pattern as laid down in 1799 for the Cavalier Guards Corps, except the latter was red instead of raspberrry; girdle – of red stamin. The crossbelt and pouch belt were trimmed with red cloth on which was the same tape as on the coat; cartridge pouches – with a white stamped and forged star, in the center of which was laid a black two-headed eagle; sabertache, shabrack, and pistol holders - of red cloth with two rows of tape, also the same as on the coat, and with stars the same as on the cartridge pouch (Illus. 1163). In addition to the clothing described above, cavalier guardsmen werer also authorized white smocks [kiteli] and similarly white forage caps: the first of calamanco, and the second of cloth, with a red band, piping, and tassel (53).

Non-commissioned officers and officer candidates [estandart-yunkera] had gold galloon along the edge of the collar and cuffs, and similarly gold buttonhole loops on the cuffs (Illus. 1164) (54).

Trumpeters and staff-trumpeters wore coats with swallows’ nests and sewn-on trim of the same tape as on the coats of private cavalier guardsmen, while their hats had red hair trim (Illus. 1164) (55).

The kettledrummer was prescribed a coat without swallows’ nests (56).

Officers had coats of straw-colored cloth with puce velvet, and with gold galloon sewn on in the same places as the tape for privates. They also had a gold aiguilette; waistcoat trimmed with gold galloon; sash – silver with black, orange, and raspberry silk; velvet supervests; shabrack and pistol holders – with gold galloon and black eagles on silver stars (Illus. 1165) (57). At grand parades, lower ranks had red worsted velvet [trip] on their uniforms and accouterments instead of red cloth, and instead of tape—gold galloon (58).

The undress coat was kept only for officers, and was, as before, of red cloth with a small standing collar, also of red cloth. It had lapels and slit cuffs of black cloth, a silver aiguilette, and similarly silver embroidered buttonhole loops: fourteen on the lapels, eight on the cuffs, and eight on the skirts (Illus. 1166) (59).

During the whole of of EMPEROR PAUL I’s reign, the Life-Guards Horse Regiment had uniform clothing, weapons, and horse furniture of the patterns for cuirassiers, with all the features that distinguished ranks within the regiment.

From November 1796, lower combatant ranks had red cloth collars and cuffs on their coats; tape was of red worsted velvet; waistcoat – dark blue; sabertache cover, shabrack, and pistol holders – dark blue, with the same small stars as for leib-cuirassiers; girdles according to the squadron: red in the Leib-Squadron, yellow in the second, dark blue in the third, green in the fourth, and black in the fifth (Illus. 1167, 1168, and 1169). Trim on the skirts or turnbacks [Obkladki na polkakh ili faldakh] of officers’ coats were in these same colors, while appointments were gold (Illus. 1170 and 1171). Trumpets and kettledrums remained silver as before (60). Officers also had a red cloth undress coat [vitse-mundir] with collar and cuffs of dark-blue cloth and lining, lining the same color as the trim on the kolet coat’s skirts, and gild buttons, while the waistcoat worn with this undress coat was white (Illus. 1172) (61).

From November 1797, with the disbandment of the Cavalier Guard squadrons, their shishak helmets and armor were transferred to the Horse Regiment of the Life Guards, part of which now appeared at grand ceremonies with silk sashes worn over the right shoulder. At first these were white with raspberry stripes, but later they were completely raspberry. Both styles had silver fringes (62).

At the beginning of 1799, the dark blue of the L.-Gds. Horse Regiment’s waistcoats, sabertaches, shabracks, and pistol carriers was changed to black, and officers were given a raspberry undress coat with a black velvet collar and cuffs and gold embroidery (Illus. 1173 and 1174) (63).

9 October 1799 – The knots [shishki] of officers’ sashes, swordknots, and hat tassels, as well as of lower ranks’ swordknots, were ordered to be raspberry. The stripes on sashes and in the tassels of hats, swordknots, and sashes were to be of three colors: black, orange, and raspberry (64).

2 February 1800 – The black waistcoats, sabertaches, shabracks, and pistol carriers of the regiment’s combatant ranks were again changed to dark blue, and officers’ undress coats were ordered to be without embroidery, with dark-blue collar, cuffs, and lining, i.e. except for the color of the lining, the same in all respects as the undress coats of 1796 and 1797 (65). A little later, Horse Guards officers were given the exact same undress coat as officers of the Cavalier Guards received in 1800, but with dark-blue lapels and cuffs instead of black, and with gold buttons and buttonhole loops instead of silver (66).

Leib Hussars [Leib-gusary], from 13 December 1797, had two uniforms: everyday and parade [vsednevnoe i paradnoe]. Both the one and the other were of the pattern authorized for army hussars.

The parade uniform for Leib Hussar privates consisted of: green cloth pelisse [mentiya] trimmed with black sable fur and lined with black astrakhan; crimson cloth dolman [dulmanka]; and cloth breeches [shtany], green at the top and crimson below. All three had cord trim and lace of white worsted and buttons of English tin. The Leib hussars wore short boots [sapogi] reaching below the knee, with a notch cut out in front and white worsted cord trim around the edge; neckcloth of black flannel; deerskingloves, with gauntlet cuffs; headdress [shapka] of raccoon fur colored black, with a crimson cloth bag, white plume, and white worsted tassels and cords; girdle [poyas] of green worsted with slides or barrels and tassels of white worsted (Illus. 1175). The top of the sabertache was of crimson cloth, with a black eagle on whose breast was a white shield, and a straw-colored monogram and crown, all of cloth, and with white worsted tape and cord piping; crimson cloth saddle cloth [valtrap] with notched green cloth trim, and with white worsted tape, cord piping, and monograms. Everything else, which is to say sword belt, saber, sword knot, carbine, cartridge pouch with strap, saddle, and all horse furniture in general, with its appurtenences, were of the same patterns as those for army hussars (67). Non-commissioned officers—who, as in the army, were not authorized the carbine and cartridge-pouch belt—were further distinguished from privates in having a cane and silver galloon on the collar, cuffs, and along the buttons of the pelisse and dolman (Illus. 1176) (68). Trumpeters were distinguished from privates, and staff-trumpeters from non-commissioned officers, by sewn-on stripes of crimson and silver worsted velvet tape, with swallows’ nests, and furthermore by the cord braid on their pelisses being white with crimson, and on the dolman—white with green (Illus. 1176) (69). For officers, all cord, lace, and buttons were silver; plumes—of the style worn by hussar generals, with wings and a tube holding the plume; instead of a pelisse—“panthers” [“barsy”], i.e. a panther skin lined with red ratine [ratin] and trimmed around with silver galloon, with silver claws at the ends of the paws (Illus. 1177 and 1178). These panther skins were worn head down, with the right front paw thrown over the left shoulder and the right back paw passed under the right arm and then the both of them fastened by the claws to a round silver medalion [medalion] decorated with the gold IMPERIAL monogram under a similarly gold crown. In this way the remaining two paws of the panther were left hanging, and the tail was thrown behind the right rear paw. The saddle cloth [valtrap] was red with silver galloon and cord, and had similarly silver embroidered monograms. Part of leib-hussar officers’ horse furniture was additional black leather sarsam decoration, plaited from thin, narrow straps (Illus. 1177 and 1179)(70).

For everyday use, combatant ranks wore white deerskin chakchiry pants without any decoration, and boots without any trim (Illus. 1180). Non-commissioned officers and trumpeters, instead of hussar headgear, wore standard cavalry hats (Illus. 1180). Officers, instead of the panther skins, wore the same pelisses prescribed for lower ranks, but with white fox fur trim [opushka iz belago, lis’yago mekha] and silver appointments instead of worsted. Their hats had plain plumes without the tube or wing (Illus. 1181). Like army hussars, Leib-Hussar officers also wore vengerki [“Hungarian”] coats of green cloth with silver trim and red lining (Illus. 1182) (71).

Non-combatant ranks were uniformed following the example of non-combatants in the Army and heavy Guards Cavalry. All except wagon drivers [izvoshchiki] and provosts [profosy]—who had dark-green greatcoats [shineli]—wore white cloth cloaks [plashchi] that were also prescribed for combatant ranks. Forage caps in the Leib-Hussar Regiment were white with a red band, and with a tassel in the squadron color (72).

1798 July 10 – Leib-Hussar trumpeters’ sewn-on lace—formerly of red worsted velvet with silver—was replaced with entirely silver lace. White cloaks were kept only for combatant hussars, and all non-combatants were prescribed dark-green greatcoats (73).

1798 October 13 – Each Leib-Hussar squadron was ordered to have 16 musketoons [mushkatony] with a barrel 17 1/2-inches [10 vershok] long, but otherwise the same fittings as for carbines (74).

1798 October 19 – For parades and ceremonial and victory days, officers and lower ranks of the two squadrons of the Leib-Hussar Regiment were ordered to have panther skins and plumes with tubes and wings (75).

1799 January 1 – The Leib-Hussar Regiment was given white pelisses and dolmans, with straw-colored [palevye] collars and cuffs; white chakchiry pants of deerskin; white sabertaches and saddlecloths with straw-colored trim; all cord, galloon, tassels, and buttons – yellow. Officers’ appointments were gold (Illus. 1183) (76).

1799 January 31– Leib-Hussars’ cloaks were replaced with greatcoats of the same pattern as for army cavalry (77).

1799 October 9 – Leib-Hussar officers were ordered to add raspberry silk to the black and orange silk of their sword knots, waistbelts, and tassels on caps and hats (78).

1799 October 20 – The white cloth of Leib-Hussar Regiment pelisses, dolmans, sabertaches, and saddlecloths was replaced with raspberry. The fur caps in use were replaced by black cloth shakos [kivera] similar to those used under EMPRESS CATHERINE II: for lower ranks—with yellow worsted trim, and for officers—with gold trim (Illus. 1184) (79).

1800 June 11 – Gloves were withdrawn from privates in the Leib-Hussar Regiment, and company-grade officers and non-commissioned officers were ordered to have them without gauntlet cuffs (80).

From 1796 December 13, Leib-Cossacks had crimson cloth half-caftans [polukaftan’ya] which they wore tucked into turquoise cloth shirovary pants. Their boots, as for all troops, had blunt toes. Their neckcloths were of black foulard silk [fler]. Headdresses [shapki] were of black Bukhara fleece with scarlet cloth bags; cords and tassels were of sky-blue and raspberry worsted, and there was a plume of white feathers. Gloves were chamois with gauntlet cuffs. Waistbelts [poyas] were of white linen [kholshchevyi] in the 1st or Leib Squadron, and dark-blue polished linen [krasheninnyi] in the 2nd or Staff [Shtabskii] Squadron (Illus. No. 1185). Weaponry and accouterments consisted of: saber, with steel or iron hilt and black scabbard with iron fittings, carried on a waistbelt [poyas] of black unfinished leather straps; pistols, with brass fittins, carried hanging from an iron hook on a deerskin bandolier [pantaler] or crossbelt [pogonnaya perevyaz’], whose buckle, prong, and end piece were of brass; cartridge pouch [lyadunka], of hussar pattern except for being a little smaller; iron lance [pika], with a red painted shaft. The saddle had a red cloth pillow and no holsters; the saddlecloth was of red cloth trimmed around the edges and diagonally across the corners with white tape; white cloth valise; all horse furniture straps black; iron buckles and rings (Illus. 1185) (81).

While wearing the exact same uniform as prescribed for private Leib-Cossacks, non-commissioned officers did not have the crossbelt, cartridge pouch, and lance, and instead of a single pistol had two placed in holsters as in the regular cavalry. In each of these holsters were six cartridge pockets. In dismounted order all that distinguished Leib-Cossack non-commissioned officers from privates was that the former had canes (Illus. 1186) (82).

Trumpeters had uniform clothing and weaponry exactly as for non-commissioned officers, but with the addition of crimson cloth swallows’ nests and yellow worsted sewn-on stripes. Their trumpets were brass with cords and tassels of yellow and crimson worsted (Illus. 1186) (83).

The staff-trumpeter was distinguished from the preceding squadron trumpeters only in that he had a cane (Illus. 1186) (84).

Officers had half-caftans with silver buttonhole loops [petlitsy], of galloon with small tassels of twisted fringe [iz vitoi kaniteli]. Sabertaches had silver tassels and cords. Sabers had the swordknots authorized for all cavalry officers. Belts for sabers were of red morocco leather (Illus. 1187). Two pistols were carried when mounted. Their saddlecloths were the same as for lower ranks but trimmed with silver galloon (85).

The Leib-Cossack uniform described here was for summer. During the rest of the year all the above-mentioned ranks wore, over the red half-caftans, very dark-blue [temno-sinii] cloth caftans [kaftany] reaching halfway down the calf and with a standing collar (Illus. 1188). For lower ranks these caftans had no trim of any kind, but for officers they had narrow silver galloon down the front opening and around the collar. Also, they had silver buttonhole loops on the chest, with small fringed tassels (Illus. 1188) (86). For cold or inclement weather all ranks were authorized white cloth cloaks [plashchi] (87).

1798 July 10Noncombatant Leib-Cossack ranks, such as: medics [fel’dshera], gunstock maker [lozhennyi master], metalsmith [slesar’], farrier [konoval], blacksmith [kuznets], and provost [profos], as well as the quartermaster [kvartermistr], legal assisant [auditor], and doctor [lekar’], were prescribed all the same uniform clothing as these ranks had in regular cavalry regiments (88).


XII. GUARDS ARTILLERY

[GVARDEISKAYA ARTILLERIYA]

Throughout almost the entire reign of EMPEROR PAUL I, the uniforms and weapons of the Guards Artillery, horse as well as foot, and of the Pioneer, Pontoon, and Train detachments with it, were the same as in the Field Artillery, Pioneer Regiment, and Pontoon Depots. Only inApril 1800 was the Life-Guards Artillery Battalion given gold buttonhole loops on their cuff flaps: for lower ranks—of galloon; for officers—embroidered. The latter also received gold aiguilettes [aksel’banty] (Illus. 1189) (89).


XIII. MILITARY EDUCATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS

[VOENNO-UCHEBNYYA ZAVEDENIYA]


1 January 1797, enrolled cadets of the Army (later 1st) Cadet Corps [stroevye kadety Sukhoputnago (v posledstvii 1-go) Kadetskago Korpusa] were given dark-green cloth coats [kaftany] with red cloth collars, lapels, and slit cuffs, with red lining and brass buttons, of which six were on each side of the lapel and three under the right lapel and on the sleeves in the cuff slit (Illus. 1190). Waistcoats and pantswere straw colored; white parade gaiters [paradnyya shtiblety]; black everyday gaiters [vsednevnyya shtiblety] and neckcloths [galstuki]. Musketeers wore tricorn hats: on parade—with narrow gold galloon, and for everyday use—without galloon, but at both times with three worsted tassels, green with a red interior (Illus. 1190). Grenadiers wore the same caps as army grenadiers except lower in height and with a plate and three grenades of gilt brass [iz mednoi, vyzolochennoi latuni]. The back of the cap was straw-colored, the band red, and the trim gold galloon with black silk, as in the Guards (Illus. 1190). Accouterments and weapons were of the patterns in use throughout the infantry (90).

Non-commissioned officers, as opposed to cadets, were prescribed the same distinctions as non-commissioned officers had relative to privates in the army. Halberd shafts were coffee-colored(91).

Drummers in Musketeer and Grenadier companies; fifers in Grenadier companies; Corps drummers and musicians: these had sewn-on stripes made of yellow worsted tape with red edges and likewise red checks in the center (92).

Officers had a uniform patterned after those for cadets, but with nine buttons on each side of the lapels, and on their hats—wide crenellated galloon, a cockade, and a buttonhole loop (Illus. 1191). For them alone in the whole Russian Army were kept gorgets of the pattern confirmed at the opening of the Corps in 1732, except now without the differences for ranks that were formerly in use, as for all grades they were silver with a gold edge, and they were worn not on a sky-blue tape, but on one that was black with orange edges. Shafts for officer spontoons were coffee-colored (93).

Cadets of the Boys’ Section [Maloletnoe Otdelenie] were given double-breasted jackets [kamzol’chiki] with covered buttons, long pants [shtany] worn buttoned to the jacket; individually sized round-toed shoes [bashmaki] with brass buckles, and three-cornered hats without any decoration except a cord to bind them up (Illus. 1192). These hats were authorized only for holidays and when outside the Corps; during the rest of the time they were replaced by cloth forage caps the same color as the jacket and pants, with a red band and a tassel of dark green mixed with white (Illus. 1192). For winter the jackets and pants were made of cloth or baize [iz sukna ili iz baiki]. These did not stay the same color, and not everyone wore identical colors at the same time: dark and light green, not infrequently sky blue, but mostly black, while in summer—of white Flemish linen. (Illus. 1192 and 1193). During freezing weather and when on leave from the Corps—in winter and summer—cadets wore over the jacket baize frock coats [sertuki] of the above mentioned colors, with a low standing collar and one row of covered buttons (Illus. 1192). During winter, when wearing the kamzol’chik as well as the kurtka jacket, each cadet was issued a pair of suede gloves with wool inserts, sewn to the ends of a particolored—or of any color whatsoever—woven tape which passed over the nape of the neck and under the armpits to bed thrown over the back with one end over the other (Illus. 1193). Cadets in the enrolled line companies powdered their hair and wore curls and queues, while in the Boys’ Section powder was not used and hair was worn without curls and queues (94).

Since 1 January 1798, cadets and officers of theArtillery and Engineer (later the 2nd)Cadet Corps received uniform clothing similar to that which the Field Artillery had, except with red cuffs instead of dark green, and with the addition of red cloth lapels and—for parades—white linen gaiters. A final difference was that officers’ waistcoats had no galloon (Illus. 1194) (95).

1798 December 23 – Uniforms were confirmed for the newly established IMPERIAL Military Orphans’ Home [IMPERATORSKIIVoenno-Sirotskii Dom]:

a) for cadets – dark-green caftan coat, waistcoat, and pants, with brass buttons. The coat had a red collar, round cuffs, and lining; white parade pants and gaiters and summer waistcoat; black neck cloth and everyday gaiters; round-toed shoes; hat with narrow gold galloon and three tassels of green and—in the center—white worsted (Illus. 1195) (96).

b) for pupils who were soldiers’ children [vospitanniki iz soldatskikh detei] – the same everyday wear as for cadets, but the neckcloth was red with white trim, and the hat had no decoration (Illus. 1196) (97).

c) for students in the Military Orphans’ Sections [uchenikii Voenno-Sirotskikh Otdelenii] – dark-green frock coat [sertuk] with a red standing collar, and with brass buttons down both sides of the chest; black neckcloth; round-toed shoes; dark-green forage cap (Illus. 1197). No underwear was issued by the government, but it was made up as the command administration saw fit (98).

Officers of the Military Orphans’ Sections had uniforms of the same colors as for cadets and hats with narrow galloon (Illus. 1198) (99).

1799 October 31 – The directive that ordered officers’ sashes, sword knots, and hat tassels have raspberry added to the black and orange silk was extended to cadet officers (100).

From 1 January 1800 – The 1st Cadet Corps, and from 13 April also the 2nd Cadet Corps, were ordered to have: coats, as before, dark green with lapels, cuffs, and lining, with a dark-green standing collar and white buttons; waistcoat and pants, as previously, straw-colored; black neckcloths; hats with binding and a buttonhole loop of narrow silver galloon, and with an officer’s cockade (Illus. 1199). On their lapels, cuffs, sleeve flaps, and waistline, officers had buttonhole loops of fine silver cord with small tassels, and on the hat—wide silver galloon with crennelations, a buttonhole loop, and a cockade (Illus. 1199) (101). The Shklov Cadet Corps also received this exact same uniform (102).


XIV. IRREGULAR TROOPS

[IRREGULYARNYYA VOISKA]


In regard to irregular forces, under EMPEROR PAUL I there were changes in the uniform of only the Chuguev and Teptyar regiments and Leib-Ural Sotnya.

On 9 January 1798, the 1st and 2nd Chuguev Regiments were given clothing of leib-cossack pattern, except with a low standing collar and diagonal hussar cuffs on the caftan coats as well as thehalf-caftans [polukaftany]. The latter were red with cords, galloon, and buttons sewn on exactly as on hussar dolmans. Shirovary pants, headdress bags, and saddlecloths were also red. Boots were black for lower ranks, yellow for officers. Accouterments and weapons were the same as for Leib-Cossacks (Illus. 1200). Outer kaftan coats were black with red lining and trimmed—for lower ranks—with tape [tes’ma] along the edges of the collar and cuffs, and for officers—additionally down the coat’s front opening, with galloon [galun] (Illus. 1200a). In the 1st Chuguev Regiment all sewn-on trim and buttons were yellow (gold for officers). In the 2nd Chuguev Regiment—white (silver for officers) (Illus. 1200 and 1200a). In regard to weapons, Chuguev cossacks were distinguished from Leib-Cossacks only in having a carbine instead of a pistol (103).

From 11 October 1798, the 1st and 2nd Teptyar Regiments were uniformed and armed similar to the Chuguev regiments, but without buttons, cord trim, and other sewn-on trim, and they had another style of headdress. They had kaftan coats and polukaftan undress coatsof dark-blue cloth, shirovary pants of black cloth, and girdles [kushaki] of straw-colored cloth with red trim along the edges (Illus. 1201). Headdresses [shapki] were of dark-blue cloth with a black band, but it is unknown what these actually looked like (104).

The Leib-Ural Sotnia, along with the same weapons and same patterns of clothing as for Leib-Cossacks, had, since 1798, raspberry kaftan coats with thin galloon trim—white for lower ranks and silver for officers. Undress coats [polukaftan’ya] and shirovary pants were also raspberry but without any trim or decoration. Headdresses, also raspberry, were square at the bottom and pointed at the top, with a wide band of black astrakhan [smushka] (Illus. 1202). Shabracks [chepraki] were raspberry, trimmed around with white tape (silver galloon for officers) (105).


XV. NATIONAL TROOPS

[NATSIONAL'NAYA VOISKA]


On 9 June 1797, the Lithuanian Tatar Horse Regiment [Litovskii Tatarskii Konnyi polk] was prescribed the following clothing, arms, and horse furniture:

Rankers [sherengovye] or privates [ryadovye] – red cloth jacket [dulam] with very dark-blue [temno-sinii] cloth collar and cuffs; shirovary pants likewise of very dark-blue cloth; boots with blunt toes and driven-in spurs; girdle of green (later yellow) stamin; black neckcloth; deerskin gloves, yellowish in color, with gauntlet cuffs; headdress of black astrakhan iwht a red cloth top, red worsted cords and tassels, and a tall white plume of fine feathers; hussar saber with iron hilt and scabbard; sword knot, sword belt, cartridge pouch, and cartridge-pouch belt of red Russianleather, stitched along the edges with white thread; brasssword-belt buckles and rings, and likewise the rings, buckles, slide, and endpiece of the cartridge pouch; yellow deerskin cross belt with brass buckle, slide, and endpiece, and an iron hook to carry the pistol; pistol with brass fittings; hussar saddle; red cloth shabrack with toothed trim of very dark-blue cloth, and white cord along the edges of the teeth; very dark-blue cloth valise (Illus. 1203)(106).

Comrades [tovarishchi]—red cloth jacket with collar and cuffs of very-dark blue cloth, trimmed with thin white cord and, on the chest, with white buttonhole loops and small tassels. Very dark-blue shirovary pants with white cord on the side seams and along the lower edge; girdle, neckcloth, gloves, and headdress the same as for rankers but with white and white worsted cords and tassels on the last item instead of all red. Hussar-pattern saber with green scabbard and iron hilt and mountings; sword knot, sword belt, cartridge pouch, cartridge-pouch belt, two pistols, saddle, shabrack, and valise—all the same as for rankers. Lance with red shaft and a pennon [khoronchevka or znachok] that was dark blue above and red below (Illus. 1204) (107).

Non-commissioned officers [namestniki, literally “deputies”)]—red cloth jacket with collar and cuffs of very dark-blue cloth, with white buttonhole loops and small tassels on the chest and silver galloon along the edges of the collar and cuffs. Shirovary pants, boots, girdle, neckcloth, gloves, and headdress the same as for comrades, with the only differences being that the last item had all-white cords and tassles, while the plume was white with a black top. Reed canes (Illus. 1204). Accouterments and weapons the same as for comrades except that lances were not prescribed for deputies (108).

Officers—red cloth jacket with collar and cuffs of very dark-blue cloth, trimmed with thin silver cord, and with silver buttonhole loops and small tassels on the chest; very dark-blue shirovary pants trimmed along the side seams and at the bottom with thin silver cord; silver girdle with a mix of black and orange silk, and with two tassels fastened to the left side; boots, neckcloth, gloves, and headdress the same as for the preceding ranks, but the last item having silver cords and tassels and a white feather plume with black feathers toward the bottom; saber of the pattern prescribed for lower ranks; sword knot of black leather with silver stitching and tassel; sword belt and cartridge pouch of red morocco, with silver stitching; cartridge-pouch belt likewise of red morocco with silver galloon sewn on over almost its entire width; sword-belt buckles and rings, as well as buckles, slide, endpiece, and rings for the cartridge pouch—all gilt; reed cane; pistols with brass mountings; shabrack the same as for lower ranks but with thin silver cord along the tooth pattern (Illus. 1205) (109).

For winter, all of the above mentioned ranks were prescribed dark-blue cloth undress coats [polukaftan’ya] with the same cuffs and collar as on the jacket, but in red. For rankers these coats were without any kind of trim (Illus. 1206); for comrades—with white trim along the edges of the collar, cuffs, front opening, skirts, and pocket flaps, with likewise white buttonhole loops and small tassels, and turned-back skirts, as on the undress Hungarian coats for hussar officers (Illus. 1206); for deputies—similar to the preceding but with silver galloon on the collar and cuffs (Illus. 1206); for officers—with thin silver cord around the collar, cuffs, front opening, skirts, and pocket flaps, and likewise silver buttonhole loops and small tassels, and turned-back skirts (Illus. 1206) (110).

Combatant ranks in the Polish Horse Regiment [Pol’skii konnyi polk] had the following uniform, accouterments, and horse furniture:

Rankers [sherengovye]—red cloth undress coat [polukaftan’e]or jacket [kurtka] (of the style introduced in the Russian army by Prince Potemkin) with a standing collar, slit cuffs, and turned-back skirts of very dark-blue cloth, trimmed with thing white cord, and with white buttons. Shirovary pants of very dark-blue cloth, with thin white cord on the sides and below; boots, neckcloth, and gloves the same as for the preceding regiment. Headdress [shapka] with a quilted crown of red cloth, a dark-blue band slit on the left side, white cord around this band, and with a likewise white feathe plume. Saber of hussar style, with iron hilt and scabbard; sword knot, sword belt, cartridge pouch, and crossbelt (used instead of a cartridge-pouch belt)—all yellow deersking. Belt plate in the front of the sword belt (with a two-headed eagle depicted in relief), all rings, buckles, slide, and endpiece—tinned brass [mednye, vyluzhennye]. Pistol with brass mountings. Red shabrack with crenellation, two-headed eagles, and IMPERIAL monograms of black cloth, these being trimmed all around with thin white cord. Saddle and other appurtenences—the same as described above for the Lithuanian Tatar Regiment (Illus. 1207)(111).

Comrades [tovarishchi]undress coat, pants, boots, neckcloth, gloves, headdress, saber, sword knot, sword belt, cartridge pouch, cartridge-pouch belt, and all horse furniture—completely identical to that for rankers, from whom they were distinguished only in armament, since instead of a single pistol on a crossbelt hook they had two in holsters [ol’stredi] under the shabrack, and were additonally armed with a lance [pika] with a shaft painted with wide black and flesh-colored, or blanched, stripes and narrow white stripes [okrashennye chernymi i blanzhevymi, shirokimi, i belymi, uzkimi polosami]. It also had a khoronchevka pennon of the same three colors with an cross swen on in the center. The upper half of the pennon and the lower half of the cross were black; the lower half of the pennon and upper half of the cross—flesh-colored; edging around the pennon and cross—white (Illus. 1208)(112).

Deputies had the same as comrades except with the addition of silver galloon on the collar and cuffs and a second row of cord on the headdress band, and not having a lance, instead of which they were authorized a cane (Illus. 1209)(113).

Officers had uniforms of the same colors and pattern as prescribed for lower ranks, but having on the collar wide silver galloon with dark-blue silk interwoven down the middle, and silver buttonhole loops. The same galloon was on the cuffs and headdress, with the latter having likewise silver cords and galloon. Thin silver cord was also on the pants and jacket’s skirts. The saber was the same as for lower ranks. The sword knot was of black leather, with silver. Sword belt, cartridge pouch, and cartridge-pouch belt—deerskin, with the same galloon as on the collar, with the last item also having two silver lines and chains [protravniki i tsepochki]. Gilt sword-belt and cartridge-pouch buckles, slides, endpieces, and rings, as well as the eagle on the sword-belt plate. Girdle [kushak] of silver and dark-blue silk, with two silver tassels in which was mixed black and orange silk. Pistols and all horse furniture—the same as for lower ranks, excepthat shabracks had thin silver cord and likewise silver fringe around the monograms and on the edges (Illus. 1209). As all officers of that time, they were prescribed to have canes (114).

From 13 April 1797, the Balaklava Greek Infantry Battalion [Balaklavskii Grecheskii Pekhotnyi batalion] was left with the same uniform clothing and weaponry as the second battalion of the Greek Infantry Regiment had under EMPRESS CATHERINE II, with only the change of red waistcoats to dark green, of green waistcoat collar and cuffs to red, of all-green spencers or jackets [spenzery or kurtki] to dark-green with red collar and lining, and of gold buttons on officers’ waistcoats to silver. For non-commissioned officers the lower edge of the collar, both sides of the jacket opening, and both sides of the waistcoat opening, were trimmed with narrow gold galloon, somewhat wider for officers (Illus. 1210 and 1211) (115).

The regiments of Prince de Condé’s corps which entered Russian service on 27 November 1797 were uniformed and armed exactly as regular Russian infantry and cavalry regiments. The colors prescribed for them were as follows:

a) Prince de Condé’s French Noble Regiment – black velvet collar, lapels, and cuffs; gold buttonhole loops (7 on each lapel, 2 on each cuff flap, 3 on each pocket flap, 2 at the waist), with wire thread [s bit’yu] without any small tassels; straw-colored waistcoat and pants; black everyday gaiters, white for parade; hats with narrow gold lace; yellow buttons, gilded; coffee-colored shafts for halberds and spontoons (Illus. 1212) (116).

b) Duke de Bourbon’s French Grenadier Regiment – black cloth collar, lapels, and cuffs; yellow buttonhole loops on cuff flaps (gold for officers, with small tassels and raspberry silk); white waistcoat and pants; yellow buttons; black gaiters; for lower ranks – straw-colored backs to grenadier caps, raspberry bands, trimmed yellow with black; for officers – hats with narrow gold galloon; coffee-colored shafts for halberds and spontoons (Illus. 1213) (117).

Duke de Hohenlohe’s German Regiment – the same and the preceding regiment, but with white buttonhole loops, buttons, and galloon (Illus. 1214) (117).

Duke de Berry’s Noble Dragoon Regiment – black cloth collar, lapels, and cuffs; gold buttonhole loops, with wire thread, without small tassels; yellow buttons (Illus. 1215) (119).

Duke d’Enghien’s Dragoon Regiment – black cloth collar and cuffs; white buttons (Illus. 1216) (120).



XVI. Detachments at various official places and government buildings, and other separate units under the military administration

[V komandakh pri raznykh prisutstvennykh mestakh i kazennykh domakh i v drugikh otdel’nykh chastyakh voennago vedomstva]


1796 December 13 and 1797 February 2feldjägers [fel’d”-yegeri, or official couriers] were given the exact same uniforms as officers in Dragoon regiments except for changing the ligh-green color of the kaftan coat to green, and the straw-colored lining to red. Their collar and cuffs were red cloth; gold aiguillette and buttons; straw-colored waistcoat which soon became green; cavalry sword with silver sword knot. Simple feldjägers as well as officers were authorized canes, and the latter were distinguished from the former only by having hats without plumes, with wide, toothed gold galloon (Illus. 1217) (121).

1797 February 16 – The Senate Battalion was given the exact same uniform and armament as already described above when (in 1800) they joined the list of Army Musketeer regiments (122).

1796 December 13 – The Medical Orderlies Detachment at the Army Hospital [Sluzhitel’skaya komanda pri Sukhoputnom gospitale]; 1797 November 2– personnel of the Invalid Detachment with the Senate’s Land Survey Department [Invalidnaya komanda pri Mezhevom Senata Departamente]; 1798 January 5Commissariat and Provisions personnel [Kommissariatskie i Proviantskie sluzhiteli]; 1798 April 21Invalid detatchments at the Olonets, Kronstadt, and Lugansk foundaries [Invalidnyya komandy pri Olonetskom, Kronshtadtskom i Luganskom liteinykh zavodakh; 1799 April 16Invalid detachments at the Postal Department and St.-Petersburg, Moscow, Little-Russian, Tambov, and Kazan post offices [Invalidnyya komandy pri Pochtovom Departamente i pri Pochamatakh: S.-Peterburgskom, Moskovskom, Mallorossiiskom, Tambovskom i Kazanskom; and 1799 November 12Invalid detachment at the St.-Petersburg city granaries [Invalidnaya komanda pri S.-Peterburgskikh gorodovykh ambarakh]—the clothing, accouterments, and weapons for these were prescribed to be the same as for garrison invalids (123).

Mines battalions (gornozavodskie bataliony) kept the uniforms they received during the reign of EMPRESS CATHERINE II (124).


XVII. STATE PROVINCIAL COMPANIES AND DETACHMENTS

[SHTATNYYA GUBERNSKIYA ROTY I KOMANDY]

1796 December 31; 1797 February 6, 19, and 26; 4 MarchState Provincial companies and detachments, in regard to their uniforms and arms, were left as they were during the preceding reign (125).

1798 October 9 – A HIGHEST Order decreed that kaftan coats in all these companies and detachments be the same color—dark green—with collars, waistcoats, and nether garments in the colors prescribed for each province (126).



XVIII. Personnel under the military administration but not part of the army itself

[Litsa voennago vedomstva, sobstvenno v sostav Armii ne vkhodivshikh]


1796 November 16 and December 18 Personnel in the Military Collegium and Commissariat and Provisions Departments were ordered to wear the uniform of the regiment from which they left to enter the administration (127).

1796 December 16 – For personnel not part of a particular regiment, but assigned to the Army at large [sostoyavshie po Armii], a standard Army uniform [obshchii armeiskii mundir] was established. For Infantry – dark-green kaftan coat, without lapels, with red collar, slit cuffs, and lining (Illus. 1218). For Cavalry – white caftan coat, without lapels, with red collar, slit cuffs, and lining (Illus. 1219). In the Infantry – white neckcloth; hat with narrow gold galloon; infantry officer’s sword [shpaga]. In the Cavalry – black neckcloth; hat without galloon, with a buttonhole loop, cockade, and white plume black and orange at the base; and a cavalry officer’s sword. In the Infantry and Cavalry – gold buttons and aiguillettes white waistcoats, deerskin breeches, boots with spurs, gloves with gauntlet cuffs; sashes, sword knots, and canes the same so for officers throughout the army (128).

1797 January 23 – The above-mentioned orders of 1769 November 16 and December 18 were applied only to those personnel of the Military Collegium and Commissarriat and Provisions Departments who would join those establishments in the future, while personnel already in these places were ordered to wear dark-green coats with cuffs and cuff flaps of that same color, without lapels, with a red cloth collar, green lining, and yellow buttons; white waistcoat and breeches; boots with spurs (Illus. 1220) (129).

1798 March 13 – All personnel and officials belonging to the General-Auditoriat, except for the General-Auditors, were given uniforms the same as those prescribed for regimental Auditors (130).

1798 DecemberOfficers of HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’S Suite for Quartermaster Affairs, who were assigned to the Infantry, were ordered to wear a coat like that for field-grade officers of the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment except without buttonhole loops, i.e. the standard army infantry uniform, while those assigned to the Cavalry had the standard army cavalry uniform (131).

1800 February 25General officers of the Military Collegium [Generalitet Voennoi Kollegii], as well as of the Commissariat and Provisions Departments [Kommissariatskii i Proviantskii Departamenty], were ordered to wear the standard army uniform for infantry [obshchii armeiskii mundir po infanterii]. The General-Auditor was prescribed the standard army uniform for cavalry while others not holding military ranks [ne imevshie voennykh chinov] had military-pattern uniforms newly established for them: dark-green with slit cuffs in that same color, with brass buttons and without a collar. Waistcoats and breeches with this coat were prescribed to be white. Hats were without galloon and tassels, and swords [shpagi] had no sword knots (Illus. 1221) (132).

1800 April 19 – All officials on the authorized Commissariat andProvisions establishments were prescribed to wear the uniforms of those administrations from which they came: military officials—military [voennye] uniforms, and civilian officials—civilian [statskie] uniforms (133).

General-Adjutants in the Infantry wore the standard army uniform for infantry with a gold aiguilette and similarly gold embroidery on the collar, cuff flaps, pocket flaps, waist, and also down the front opening (Illus. 1222) (134).

Infantry Aides-de-Camp [Fligel’-Ad”yutanty po Infanterii] wore a coat similar to the above, but with silver buttons, aiguilette, and embroidery (Illus. 1222) (135).

General-Adjutants in the Cavalry had the standard army uniform for cavalry, with a gold aiguilette and similarly gold embroidery on the collar, cuffs, pocket flaps, waist, and down the front opening (Illus. 1223) (136).

Cavalry Aides-de-Camp had the same uniform as General-Adjutants but with silver buttons, aiguilettes, and embroidery (Illus. 1223) (137).



XIX. RETIRED PERSONNEL

[OTSTAVNYE]


1796 December 7 – Guards and all other officers released from service since December 4th of this year were ordered—except for those who received special permission by HIGHEST Authority—to not wear military uniforms, but rather use provincial civl uniforms [mundiry gubernskie] according to where they have estates (138).

1796 December 13 – All generals and officers who retired before December 4th of this year were permitted to wear the uniforms in which they served (139).


XX. ORDERLIES

[DEN’SHCHIKI]


1797 AugustOrderlies [den’shchiki] and company and field-grade officers’ own servants [sobstvennye lyudi] were ordered to have dark-green clothing with collar and cuffs in the regimental facing color. The cut of the clothing was left up to the Honorary Colonel [Shef], but with the proviso that it not vary within an individual regiment (140).

[1801 January 24 – Major General Cozens is reprimanded for having orderlies in his regiment wearing jackets [kurtki]. It is confirmed for the whole Army that such a violation is not to be permitted (HIGHEST Order of 24 January 1801). - M.C.]





Flags and Standards

[Znamena i Shtandarty]


I. In Grenadier, Musketeer, and Garrison regiments.


Until the ascension to the throne of EMPEROR PAUL I, flags and standards were treated along with accouterments and weaponry and had prescribed wear-out times. EMPEROR PAUL I decreed that flags as well as standards would serve indefinitely, and wherever he was present they were presented without any accompanying grant document [gramota], almost always from his own hands. In other troop locations beyond the IMPERIAL presence, flags and standards were supplied, except in a very few instances, with grant documentation signed by the EMPEROR.

All flags granted to Grenadier, Musketeer, and Garrison regiments throughout the years 1797, 1798 and 1799 were identical in pattern and dimensions, being made up of a cross [krest], four corners [ugly], and a circle [krug]. They were 56 inches [2 arshina] in both length and width, and made from silk, preferably gros de Tours [grodetur]. Sometimes camelot [kamelot] was used. The cloth of the flag was sewn to a wide piece of silk material called a “reserve” [“zapas”], which was wound around the pole [drevko]. It was then fastened along the seam by nails with gilded brass heads (Illus. 1224). At the bottom of the pole was fixed a gilded brass base [podtok]. On the top was seated a similarly gilded brass flat spearhead [kop’e] with a socket [trubka]. In the center of the spearhead was a gilt image of a two-headed eagle (Illus. 1225). Below the spearhead, at the edge of the socket, were hung two tassels of silver with black and orange silk, fastened to the ends of a doubled-over length of silver lace, exactly as prescribed for infantry officers’ sword knots (Illus. 1225). The length of the pole was 10-1/2 feet [4-1/2 arshina]; the spearhead, with socket—8-3/4 inches [5-1/2 vershkov]; the length of each half of the lace ribbon, with tassel—28 inches [1 arshin i 3 vershka]; height of the base—3-1/2 inches [2 vershka].

For each regiment, flags were issued in accordance with the number of Musketeer companies. The flag of the first—or honorary colonel’s—company, invariably had a white cross and colored corners. On the flags for the remaining companies crosses were colored. For all flags the circle was light orange with a black two-headed eagle and—at the sides of the latter—green laurel wreathes bound with sky-blue ribbon. The shield on the eagle’s breast was red, as in the Moscow coat of arms, while the edge around the shield, the chains of the Order of St. Andrew the First-Called, crowns, scepter, and orb were all gold (Illus. 1224). The zapas was made in the same color as the cross, and there were four colors possible for the pole: straw, white, coffee, and black (141).

The flags issued in 1797, 1798, and 1799 to Grenadier, Musketeer, and Garrison regiments were as follows:

Leib-Grenadiers – (in 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1224a); for the others a sky-blue cross and white corners (Illus. 1224b); straw colored poles (142).

Pavlovsk Grenadiers – (in 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and orange corners (Illus. 1226a); for the others an orange cross and white corners (Illus. 1226b); straw colored poles (143).

Yekaterinoslav Grenadiers – (in 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half coffee and half dark blue, with a dark-blue (Illus. 1226c); for the others a coffee cross and corners half dark blue and half white (Illus. 1226d); yellow poles (144).

St.-Petersburg Grenadiers – (23 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and puce corners (Illus. 1226e); for the others a puce cross and corners half puce and half white (Illus. 1226f); white poles (145).

Astrakhan Grenadiers – (1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and apricot corners (Illus. 1226g); for the others an apricot cross and white corners (Illus. 1226h); white poles (146).

Kiev Grenadiers – (30 October 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and puce corners (Illus. 1226i); for the others a dark-blue cross and corners half grey and half white (Illus. 1226f); white poles (147).

Moscow Grenadiers – (15 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark blue and half light orange (Illus. 1226l); for the others a dark-blue cross and light-orange corners (Illus. 1226m); straw-colored poles (148).

Little Russia Grenadiers – (30 October 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half rose and half black (Illus. 1227a); for the others a black cross and rose corners (Illus. 1227b); black poles (149).

Siberia Grenadiers – (15 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half black (Illus. 1227c); for the others a cross half green and half rose, with black corners (Illus. 1227d); white poles (150).

Phanagoria Grenadiers – (15 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half rose and half green (Illus. 1227e); for the others a rose cross and green corners (Illus. 1227f); white poles (151).

Kherson Grenadiers – (15 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half apple-green (Illus. 1227g); for the others a violet cross and apple-green corners (Illus. 1227h); black poles (152).

Taurica Grenadiers – (25 April 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half yellow and half coffee (Illus. 1227i); for the others a cross half coffee and half yellow, with white corners (Illus. 1227k); straw-colored poles (153).

Caucasus Grenadiers – (21 January 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half apricot (Illus. 1227l); for the others a violet cross and apricot corners (Illus. 1227m); white poles (154).

Belozersk Musketeers – (8 January 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half sky-blue and half straw-colored (Illus. 1228a); for the others a sky-blue cross and straw-colored corners (Illus. 1228b); black poles (155).

Nasheburg Musketeers – (28 February 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and gray corners (Illus. 1228c); for the others a gray cross and white corners (Illus. 1228c); coffee-colored poles (156).

Chernigov Musketeers – (3 July 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half celadon-green and half violet (Illus. 1228e); for the others a violet cross and celadon-green corners (Illus. 1228f); black poles (157).

New-Ingermanland Musketeers – (19 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half straw colored and half dark puce (Illus. 1228g); for the others a cross half dark-puce and half straw-colored, with white corners (Illus. 1228h); coffee-colored poles (158).

Yaroslav Musketeers – (28 February 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half raspberry and half black (Illus. 1228i); for the others a raspberry cross and corners half black and half white (Illus. 1228k); straw-colored poles (159).

Apsheron Musketeers – (30 July 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half rose and half light sky-blue (Illus. 1228l); for the others a rose cross and light sky-blue corners (Illus. 1228m); black poles (160).

Smolensk Musketeers – (15 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half mordoré [mordore– bronze-like reddish brown] and half green (Illus. 1228n); for the others a mordoré cross and green corners (Illus. 1228o); straw-colored poles (161).

Ryazhsk Musketeers – (20 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and green corners (Illus. 1228r); for the others a green cross and white corners (Illus. 1228q); black poles (162).

Kursk Musketeers – (15 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half puce (Illus. 1229a); for the others a dark-green cross and puce corners (Illus. 1229b); black poles (163).

Kozlov Musketeers – (7 December 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half rose and half black (Illus. 1229c); for the others a rose cross and black corners (Illus. 1229d); white poles (164).

Sevastopol Musketeers – (1 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half sky-blue and half brown (Illus. 1229e); for the others a sky-blue cross and brown corners (Illus. 1229f); white poles (165).

Belev Musketeers – (1 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half rose (Illus. 1229g); for the others a green cross and rose corners (Illus. 1229h); coffee-colored poles (166).

Aleksopol Musketeers – (11 November 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half brown and half rose (Illus. 1229i); for the others a cross half brown and half celadon-green, and rose corners (Illus. 1229k); black poles (167).

Schlüsselburg Musketeers – (3 May 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half celadon-green and half rose (Illus. 1229l); for the others a rose cross and celadon-green corners (Illus. 1229m); black poles (168).

Bryansk Musketeers – (30 October 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half yellow and half violet (Illus. 1229n); for the others a cross half white and half yellow, and violet corners (Illus. 1229o); coffee-colored poles (169).

Troitsk Musketeers – (1 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half green (Illus. 1229p); for the others a violet cross and green corners (Illus. 1229q); straw-colored poles (170).

Ladoga Musketeers – (15 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark brown and half celadon-green (Illus. 1230a); for the others a dark-brown cross and celadon-green corners (Illus. 1230b); black poles (171).

Polotsk Musketeers – (15 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark brown and half rose (Illus. 1230c); for the others a dark-brown cross and rose corners (Illus. 1230d); black poles (172).

Archangel Musketeers – (15 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half brown (Illus. 1230e); for the others a green cross and brown corners (Illus. 1230f); black poles (173).

Old-Ingermanland Musketeers – (20 November 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half rose and half light green (Illus. 1230g); for the others a cross half rose and half light green, and white corners (Illus. 1230h); white poles (174).

Novgorod Musketeers – (15 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark brown and half sky-blue (Illus. 1230i); for the others a dark-brown cross and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1230k); white poles (175).

Nizhnii-Novgorod Musketeers – (15 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half black and half celadon-green (Illus. 1230l); for the others a black cross and celadon-green corners (Illus. 1230m); coffee-colored poles (176).

Vitebsk Musketeers – (1 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half rose and half dark blue [sinii] (Illus. 1230n); for the others a rose cross and dark-blue corners (Illus. 1230o); white poles (177).

Azov Musketeers – (15 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half rose and half puce (Illus. 1230p); for the others a rose cross and puce corners (Illus. 1230q); straw-colored poles (178).

Orel Musketeers – (15 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half puce and half apple-green (Illus. 1231a); for the others a puce cross and apple-green corners (Illus. 1231b); straw-colored poles (179).

Reval Musketeers – (23 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half rose and half green (Illus. 1231c); for the others a green cross and rose corners (Illus. 1231d); white poles (180).

Tula Musketeers – (30 July 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half puce and half light sky-blue (Illus. 1231e); for the others a puce cross and corners half light sky-blue and half white (Illus. 1231f); coffee-colored poles (181).

Yelets Musketeers – (6 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half light green and half raspberry (Illus. 1231g); for the others a cross of three raspberry stripes and two light green, with white corners (Illus. 1231h); black poles (182).

Pskov Musketeers – (30 July 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half rose (Illus. 1231i); for the others a green cross and corners half rose and half white (Illus. 1231k); straw-colored poles (183).

Tambov Musketeers – (30 July 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half very dark blue [temnosinii] and half puce (Illus. 1231l); for the others a cross of three white stripes and two very dark blue, with puce corners (Illus. 1231m); black poles (184).

Rostov Musketeers – (5 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half light green and half black (Illus. 1231n); for the others a black cross and light-green corners (Illus. 1231o); coffee-colored poles (185).

Murom Musketeers – (30 July 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark blue and half rose (Illus. 1231p); for the others a dark-blue cross and rose corners (Illus. 1231q); coffee-colored poles (186).

Staryi-Oskol Musketeers – (30 July 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half light orange [svetloaranzhevyi] and half puce (Illus. 1232a); for the others a puce cross and light-orange corners (Illus. 1232b); white poles (187).

Tobolsk Musketeers – (2 July 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half raspberry and half sky-blue (Illus. 1232c); for the others a raspberry cross and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1232d); white poles (188).

Tiflis Musketeers – (21 January 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half puce and half siskin-green [chizhovyi– a delicate shade of yellowish green] (Illus. 1232e); for the others a puce cross and corners half siskin-green and half apricot (Illus. 1232f); black poles (189).

Voronezh Musketeers – (15 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark puce and half very dark blue (Illus. 1232g); for the others a dark-puce cross and very dark blue corners (Illus. 1232h); white poles (190).

Kazan Musketeers – (21 January 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half white (Illus. 1232i); for the others both cross and corners half straw and half violet (Illus. 1232k); straw-colored poles (191).

Moscow Musketeers – (30 October 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark blue and half lilac (Illus. 1232l); for the others a dark-blue cross and lilac corners (Illus. 1232m); white poles (192).

Kabarda Musketeers – (21 January 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half rose (Illus. 1232n); for the others a violet cross and rose corners (Illus. 1232o); white poles (193).

Vladimir Musketeers – (15 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark blue and half puce (Illus. 1232p); for the others a very dark-blue cross and corners half puce and half white (Illus. 1232q); white poles (194).

Uglich Musketeers – (30 October 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half puce and half dark blue (Illus. 1233a); for the others a cross half dark blue and half white, and puce corners (Illus. 1233b); straw-colored poles (195).

Sevsk Musketeers – (13 August 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half celadon-green and half violet (Illus. 1233c); for the others a cross half celadon-green and half violet, and white corners (Illus. 1233d); black poles (196).

Narva Musketeers – (30 October 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half mordoré and half light sky-blue (Illus. 1233e); for the others a mordoré cross and light sky-blue corners (Illus. 1233f); white poles (197).

Dniepr Musketeers – (8 March 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half yellow and half black (Illus. 1233g); for the others a yellow cross and corners half white and half black (Illus. 1233h); straw-colored poles (198).

Vyatka Musketeers – (27 October 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half light sky-blue and half violet (Illus. 1233i); for the others a light sky-blue cross and violet corners (Illus. 1233k); coffee-colored poles (199).

Suzdal Musketeers – (21 January 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and puce corners (Illus. 1233l); for the others both cross and corners half puce and half violet (Illus. 1233m); straw-colored poles (200).

Kexholm Musketeers – (1 November 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and rose corners (Illus. 1233n); for the others a rose cross and white corners (Illus. 1233o); coffee-colored poles (201).

Viborg Musketeers – (5 April 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half yellow and half puce (Illus. 1233p); for the others a puce cross and yellow corners (Illus. 1233q); coffee-colored poles (202).

Ryazan Musketeers – (21 August 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and raspberry corners (Illus. 1234a); for the others a raspberry cross and white corners (Illus. 1234b); white poles (203).

Neva Musketeers – (10 August 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and puce corners (Illus. 1234c); for the others a puce cross and white corners (Illus. 1234d); black poles (204).

Velikie-Luki Musketeers – (28 September 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half straw-colored and half black (Illus. 1234e); for the others a straw-colored cross and black corners (Illus. 1234f); black poles (205).

Sofiya Musketeers – (31 August 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half puce and half green (Illus. 1234g); for the others a cross half green and half puce, and white corners (Illus. 1234h); coffee-colored poles (206).

Shirvan Musketeers – (21 January 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half gray [dikii] and half puce (Illus. 1234i); for the others a gray cross and puce corners (Illus. 1234k); white poles (207).

Perm Musketeers – (15 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half light brown and half green (Illus. 1234l); for the others a light-brown cross and green corners (Illus. 1234m); white poles (208).

Nizovsk Musketeers – (15 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half gray and half puce (Illus. 1234n); for the others a puce cross and gray corners (Illus. 1234o); white poles (209).

Butyrsk Musketeers – (5 July 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half siskin-green and half puce (Illus. 1234p); for the others a cross half siskin-green and half puce, and corners half white and half puce (Illus. 1234q); black poles (210).

Ufa Musketeers – (9 January 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and dark-violet corners (Illus. 1235a); for the others a dark-violet cross and white corners (Illus. 1235b); black poles (211).

Rylsk Musketeers – (9 January 1795 [sic – should be 1798]) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half very dark blue (Illus. 1235c); for the others a green cross and very dark-blue corners (Illus. 1235d); coffee-colored poles (212).

Yekaterinburg Musketeers – (9 January 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half very dark blue and half puce (Illus. 1235e); for the others a very dark-blue cross and puce corners (Illus. 1235f); coffee-colored poles (213).

Selenginsk Musketeers – (21 January 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half puce and half black (Illus. 1235g); for the others a puce cross and black corners (Illus. 1235h); black poles (214).

Tomsk Musketeers – (21 January 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half puce and half green (Illus. 1235i); for the others a puce cross and green corners (Illus. 1235k); coffee-colored poles (215).

Arkharov’s Musketeers – (18 December 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half pale pink [blednorozovyi] (Illus. 1235l); for the others a pale pink cross and green corners (Illus. 1235m); coffee-colored poles (216).

Pavlutskii’s Musketeers – (22 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half black (Illus. 1236a); for the others a black cross and on it a white cross, and pink corners (Illus. 1236b); straw-colored poles (217).

Leitner’s Musketeers – (22 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half green (Illus. 1236c); for the others a green cross with a white cross on it, and pink corners (Illus. 1236d); white poles (218).

Brant’s Musketeers – (22 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and green corners (Illus. 1236e); for the others a green cross with a white cross on it, and white corners (Illus. 1236f); white poles (219).

Müller 1st’s Musketeers – (22 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and violet (Illus. 1236g); for the others a violet cross with a white cross on it, and white corners (Illus. 1236h); white poles (220).

Marklovskii’s Musketeers – (22 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark green and half apricot (Illus. 1236i); for the others a dark-green cross with a white cross on it, and apricot corners (Illus. 1236k); white poles (221).

Berg’s Musketeers – (22 February 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half very dark blue (Illus. 1236l); for the others a pink cross with a white cross on it, and very dark-blue corners (Illus. 1236m); white poles (222).

St.-Peterburg Garrison – (21 December 1797) 10 flags: one with a white cross and puce corners (Illus. 1237a); for the others a cross of three dark-green and two white stripes, and puce corners (Illus. 1237b); coffee-colored poles (223).

Moscow Garrison – (28 February 1798) 40 flags: one with a white cross and dark-blue corners (Illus. 1237c); for the others a dark-blue cross and white corners (Illus. 1237d); white poles (224).

Viborg Garrison – (25 October 1798) 20 flags: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half black (Illus. 1237e); for the others a black cross and corners half pink and half green (Illus. 1237f); straw-colored poles (225).

Fredrikshamn Garrison – (5 September 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half black and half green (Illus. 1237g); for the others a cross of three white and two green stripes, and black corners (Illus. 1237h); white poles (226).

Reval Garrison – (13 June 1798) 15 flags: one with a white cross and pink corners (Illus. 1237i); for the others a pink cross and white corners (Illus. 1237k); straw-colored poles (227).

Riga Garrison – (13 June 1798) 20 flags: one with a white cross and mordoré corners (Illus. 1237l); for the others a mordoré cross and white corners (Illus. 1237m); black poles (228).

Archangel Garrison – (12 August 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half pink (Illus. 1237n); for the others a green cross and pink corners (Illus. 1237o); black poles (229).

Kazan Garrison – (15 June 1798) 15 flags: one with a white cross and violet corners (Illus. 1237p); for the others a violet cross and white corners (Illus. 1237q); black poles (230).

Orenburg Garrison – (31 August 1798) 20 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half gray (Illus. 1238a); for the others a green cross and gray corners (Illus. 1238b); black poles (231).

Tobolsk Garrison – (16 June 1799) 15 flags: one with a white cross and corners half sapphire [yakhontovyi] and half pink (Illus. 1238c); for the others a sapphire cross and pink corners (Illus. 1238d); coffee-colored poles (232).

Smolensk Garrison – (12 August 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half orange and half light sky-blue (Illus. 1238e); for the others a cross half orange and half white, and corners half light sky-blue and half black (Illus. 1238f); white poles (233).

Selenginsk Garrison – (16 June 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and violet corners (Illus. 1238g); for the others a violet cross and white corners (Illus. 1238h); straw-colored poles (234).

Kiev Garrison – (19 November 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half mordoré and half black (Illus. 1238i); for the others a cross half mordoré and half black, and apricot corners (Illus. 1238k); straw-colored poles (235).

Taganrog Garrison – (11 May 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half light-cherry [svetlovishnevyi] and half dark blue (Illus. 1238l); for the others a light-cherry cross and dark-blue corners (Illus. 1238m); straw-colored poles (236).

Baltic Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half mordoré and half green (Illus. 1238n); for the others a cross half green and half mordoré, and white corners (Illus. 1238o); coffee-colored poles (237).

Dünamünde Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark blue and half puce (Illus. 1238p); for the others a cross half puce and half dark blue, and white corners (Illus. 1238q); white poles (238).

Irkutsk Garrison – (16 June 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half smoke-colored [dymchatyi] and half dark blue (Illus. 1239a); for the others a smoke-colored cross and dark-blue corners (Illus. 1239b); black poles (239).

Kronstadt Garrison – (10 September 1798) 20 flags: one with a white cross and corners half mordoré and half dark blue (Illus. 1239c); for the others a cross half mordoré and half dark blue, and white corners (Illus. 1239d); coffee-colored poles (240).

Narva Garrison – (13 June 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half white (Illus. 1239e); for the others a cross half dark blue and half pink, and white corners (Illus. 1239f); white poles (241).

Yelisavetgrad Garrison – (19 November 1798) 15 flags: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half puce (Illus. 1239g); for the others a puce cross and pink corners (Illus. 1239h); white poles (242).

Dmitrii Garrison – (11 May 1799) 15 flags: one with a white cross and corners half raspberry and half sky-blue (Illus. 1239i); for the others a white cross on a raspberry cross, and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1239k); straw-colored poles (243).

Azov Garrison – (11 May 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half mordoré and half pink (Illus. 1239l); for the others a cross half mordoré and half turquoise, and pink corners (Illus. 1239m); black poles (244).

Omsk Garrison – (16 June 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half pink (Illus. 1239n); for the others a violet cross and pink corners (Illus. 1239o); white poles (245).

Astrakhan Garrison – (11 May 1799) 20 flags: one with a white cross and corners half orange and half black (Illus. 1239p); for the others a cross half orange and half white, and corners half black and half raspberry (Illus. 1239q); black poles (246).

Tsaritsyn Garrison – (11 May 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half raspberry and half green (Illus. 1240a); for the others a white cross on a raspberry cross, and green corners (Illus. 1240b); white poles (247).

Kizlyar Garrison – (11 May 1799) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half orange and half green (Illus. 1240c); for the others a cross half orange and half white, and corners half green and half black (Illus. 1240d); black poles (248).

Schlüsselburg Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark-blue with double-faced lilac material [lilovyi, dvulichnoi materii] and half black (Illus. 1240e); for the others a dark- dark-blue cross with double-faced lilac material, and black corners (Illus. 1240f); white poles (249).

Villmanstrand Garrison – (25 October 1798) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half very dark blue and half light brown (Illus. 1240g); for the others a cross half light brown and half dark blue, and white corners (Illus. 1240h); white poles (250).

Kexholm Garrison – (25 October 1798) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half black and half pink (Illus. 1240i); for the others a cross of three black stripes and two light sky-blue stripes, and pink corners (Illus. 1240k); coffee-colored poles (251).

Nyslott Garrison – (25 October 1798) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half light sky-blue and half mordoré (Illus. 1240l); for the others a cross half mordoré and half light sky-blue, and white corners (Illus. 1240m); straw-colored poles (252).

Arensburg Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark blue and half violet (Illus. 1240n); for the others a cross half dark blue and half violet, and white corners (Illus. 1240o); black poles (253).

Pernau Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half sky-blue and half pink (Illus. 1240p); for the others a cross half pink and half sky-blue, and white corners (Illus. 1240q); straw-colored poles (254).

Bakhmut Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half smoke-colored and half green (Illus. 1241a); for the others a smoke-colored cross and green corners (Illus. 1241b); straw-colored poles (255).

Tambov Garrison – (22 April 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and mordoré corners (Illus. 1241c); for the others a mordoré cross and white corners (Illus. 1241d); straw-colored poles (256).

Voronezh Garrison – (19 July 1798) 5 flags: one with a white cross and dark-blue corners (Illus. 1241e); for the others a dark-blue cross and white corners (Illus. 1241f); straw-colored poles (257).

Vladimir Garrison – (13 June 1798) 5 flags: one with a white cross and apricot corners (Illus. 1241g); for the others an apricot cross and white corners (Illus. 1241h); coffee-colored poles (258).

Simbirsk Garrison – (11 May 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half black and half brown (Illus. 1241i); for the others a cross half brown and half black, and white corners (Illus. 1241k); black poles (259).

Nizhnii-Novgorod Garrison – (during 1797) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half green and half black (Illus. 1241l); for the others a green cross and black corners (Illus. 1241m); white poles (260).

Novgorod Garrison – (4 May 1798) 5 flags: one with a white cross and pink corners (Illus. 1241n); for the others a pink cross and white corners (Illus. 1241o); white poles (261).

Tver Garrison – (7 December 1797) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half straw-colored (Illus. 1241p); for the others cross and corners are half violet and half straw-colored (Illus. 1241q); black poles (262).

Aleksandrovsk Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half apricot and half dark blue (Illus. 1242a); for the others an apricot cross and dark-blue corners (Illus. 1242b); black poles (263).

Sudak Garrison (formerly Kirilov)– (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half gray (Illus. 1242c); for the others a violet cross and gray corners (Illus. 1242d); white poles (264).

Petrovsk Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark blue and half white (Illus. 1242e); for the others a cross half dark blue and half celadon-green, and white corners (Illus. 1242f); black poles (265).

Balaklava Garrison (formerly Nikitinsk, and from 3 September 1799 assigned to the Corfu fortress – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half sky-blue and half puce (Illus. 1242g); for the others an cross half dark-blue and half black, and puce corners (Illus. 1242h); straw-colored poles (266).

Perekop Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark blue and half smoke-colored (Illus. 1242i); for the others a dark-blue cross and smoke-colored corners (Illus. 1242k); black poles (267).

Stavropol Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half black and half sky-blue (Illus. 1242l); for the others a black cross and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1242m); coffee-colored poles (268).

Orsk Garrison (formerly Ozernaya) – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark green and half smoke-colored (Illus. 1242n); for the others an dark-green cross and smoke-colored corners (Illus. 1242o); straw-colored poles (269).

Kizilsk Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and green corners (Illus. 1242p); for the others an green cross and white corners (Illus. 1242q); white poles (270).

Verkhneuralsk Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half cherry and half green (Illus. 1243a); for the others a cherry cross and green corners (Illus. 1243b); white poles (271).

Troitsk Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half light sky-blue and half brown (Illus. 1243c); for the others a light sky-blue cross and brown corners (Illus. 1243d); white poles (272).

Zverinogolovsk Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark brown and half celadon-green (Illus. 1243e); for the others a dark-brown cross and celadon-green corners (Illus. 1243f); straw-colored poles (273).

Pskov Garrison (formerly Senno)– (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half puce and half sky-blue (Illus. 1243g); for the others a cross of three puce stripes and two light sky-blue stripes, and orange corners (Illus. 1243h); black poles (274).

Dünaburg Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half green (Illus. 1243i); for the others a white cross on a cross that is half green and half pink, and white corners (Illus. 1243k); straw-colored poles (275).

Vitebsk Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half sky-blue and half pink (Illus. 1243l); for the others a cross half sky-blue and half pink, and dark-blue corners (Illus. 1243m); straw-colored poles (276).

Polotsk Garrison – (25 October 1798) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark blue and half pink (Illus. 1243n); for the others a cross half pink and half dark blue, and white corners (Illus. 1243o); white poles (277).

Rogachev Garrison (formerly Mogilev)– (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half raspberry and half green (Illus. 1243p); for the others a white cross on a raspberry cross, and green corners (Illus. 1243q); white poles (278).

Staryi-Bykhov Garrison – (12 August 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half orange and half sky-blue (Illus. 1244a); for the others a cross half orange and half white, and corners half sky-blue and half black (Illus. 1244b); black poles (279).

Tomsk Garrison – (16 June 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half yellow (Illus. 1244c); for the others a violet cross and yellow corners (Illus. 1244d); coffee-colored poles (280).

Semipalatinsk Garrison – (16 June 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half dark brown and half very dark blue (Illus. 1244e); for the others a dark-brown cross and very dark-blue corners (Illus. 1244f); black poles (281).

Biisk Garrison – (16 June 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and dark-brown corners that are half mordoré with turquoise (Illus. 1244g); for the others a dark-brown cross and corners that are mordoré with turquoise (Illus. 1244h); white poles (282).

Petropavlovsk Garrison – (16 June 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half celadon-green and half dark-blue (Illus. 1244i); for the others a cross half celadon-green with mordoré, and corners dark blue with lilac (Illus. 1244k); straw-colored poles (283).

Mozdok Garrison – (11 May 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half orange and half green (Illus. 1244l); for the others an orange cross and corners half green and half black (Illus. 1244m); black poles (284).

Saratov Garrison – (30 July 1798) 5 flags: one with a white cross and brown corners (Illus. 1245a); for the others a brown cross and white corners (Illus. 1245b); straw-colored poles (285).

Rochensalm Garrison – (9 January 1798) 15 flags: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half black (Illus. 1245c); for the others a cross of three pink stripes and two white stripes, and black corners (Illus. 1245d); coffee-colored poles (286).

Sevastopol Garrison – (10 January 1798) 10 flags: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half green (Illus. 1245e); for the others a cross of three pink stripes and two white stripes, and green corners (Illus. 1245f); white poles (287).

Nikolaev Garrison – (19 November 1798) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half smoke-colored and half violet (Illus. 1245g); for the others a smoke-colored cross and violet corners (Illus. 1245h); white poles (288).

Nizhne-Kamchatka Garrison – (16 June 1799) 5 flags: one with a white cross and corners half black and half raspberry (Illus. 1245i); for the others a black cross and raspberry corners (Illus. 1245k); white poles (289).

1800 – New pattern flags were established for Grenadier, Musketeer, and Garrison regiments. As before, they consisted of: cross, corners, EMPEROR PAUL I’s monogram within laurels and under a crown, and a circle, also under a crown, surrounded by two laurel branches. Within the circle was the image of a two-headed eagle hurling thunderbolts , and over the eagle an inscription: one one side of the flag—“S nami Bog” [“God is with us”], and on the other—“Blagodat’” [“Blessing”] (Illus. 1246). This circle was light orange on all flags without exception. The eagle was black; red flame under the eagle’s talons; the crown entirely gold; sky-blue ribbons tying the laurels, and under the eagles; the spearhead on the pole had the IMPERIAL monogram in place of a two-headed eagle, of two Cyrillic P’s crossed over each other, and the numeral I (Illus. 1246) (290).

The colors prescribed for the 1800-pattern flags were as follows:

a) For regiments in the Livland, Smolensk, Lithuania, and Brest Inspectorates—one flag with a white cross and corners half black and half red (Illus. 1246a); for the others—a black cross and red corners (Illus. 1246b); for all—silver laurels, thunderbolts, and monograms on the corners (291).

b) For regiments in the Ukraine, Dniester, Crimea, and Caucasus Inspectorates—one flag with a white cross and corners half yellow and half white (Illus. 1247a); for the others—a white cross on a yellow cross, and white corners (Illus. 1247b); for all—gold laurels, thunderbolts, and monograms on the corners (292).

c) For regiments in the Finland Inspectorate—one flag with a white cross and corners half of a lighter shade of dark blue [svetlo-sinii] and half black (Illus. 1247c); for the others—a lighter shade of dark-blue cross and black corners (Illus. 1247d); for all—gold laurels, thunderbolts, and monograms on the corners (293).

d) For regiments in the Orenburg and Siberia Inspectorates—one flag with a white cross and corners half green and half yellow (Illus. 1247e); for the others—a green cross and yellow corners (Illus. 1247f); for all—gold laurels, thunderbolts, and monograms on the corners (294).

e) For regiments in the St.-Petersburg and Moscow Inspectorates—one flag with a cross half white and half raspberry [sic – should be a white cross with corners half white and half raspberry? – M.C.] (Illus. 1247g); for the others—a white cross on a raspberry cross, and white corners (Illus. 1247f); for all—gold laurels, thunderbolts, and monograms on the corners (295).

Flags of these patterns were granted during 1800 to the following units:

a) In the Livland Inspectorate: (Illus. 1246a and 1246b): 30 March—10 to the Taurica Grenadier Regiment (296), and 26 December—20 to Balashev’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Reval and Pernau garrisons) (297).

b) In the Smolensk Inspectorate: (Illus. 1246a and 1246b): 6 March—10 to the Moscow Grenadier Regiment (298), and 5 August—20 to Prince Ghica’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Dünamünde, Smolensk, Vitebsk, and Mogilev garrisons) (299).

c) In the Lithuania Inspectorate: (Illus. 1246a and 1246b): 28 February—10 to the Archangel Grenadier Regiment (300).

d) In the Ukraine Inspectorate: (Illus. 1247a and 1247b): 17 March—10 to the Smolensk Musketeer Regiment (301), and 30 August—20 to Masse’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Kiev and Kherson garrisons) (302).

e) In the Crimea Inspectorate: (Illus. 1247a and 1247b): 26 December—20 to Koshelev’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Nikolaev, Perekop, and Sevastopol garrisons) (303).

f) In the Caucasus Inspectorate: (Illus. 1247a and 1247b): 17 December—10 to the Kabarda Musketeer Regiment (304); 1 October—20 to Ol’vintsev’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Taganrog, Dimitrii, and Azov garrisons) (305); also 1 October—20 to Graf Lieven 3rd’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Astrakhan, Tsaritsyn, and Simbirsk garrisons) (306).

g) In the Finland Inspectorate: (Illus. 1247c and 1247d): 21 June—20 to Plutalov’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Schlüsselburg, Villmanstrand, Kexholm, and Nyslott garrisons) (307); 5 August—20 to Prince Gorchakov 1st’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Viborg and Fredrikshamn garrisons) (308); 30 August—20 to Bolotnikov’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Rochensalm and Arensburg garrisons) (309).

h) In the Orenburg Inspectorate: (Illus. 1247e and 1247f): 16 June—20 to Lebedev’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Orenburg, Tambov and Voronezh garrisons) (310); 21 July—20 to Pushchin 1st’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Kazan and Tobolsk garrisons) (311); 21 July—20 to Sendenhorst’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Semipalatinsk, Petrovsk, Verkhneuralsk, and Troitsk garrisons) (312); 21 July—to Gogel’ 1st’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Saratov, Zverinogolovsk, and Kizilsk garrisons) (313).

i) In the Siberia Inspectorate: (Illus. 1247e and 1247f): 5 July—20 to Leccano’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Irkutsk and Selenginsk garrisons) (314); 5 July—20 to Retyunskii’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Omsk, Zhelezinsk, Biisk, and Tomsk garrisons) (315).

k) In the St.-Petersburg Inspectorate: (Illus. 1247g and 1247h): 2 April—10 to the Senate Regiment; 26 May—20 to Marklovskii 2nd’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Narva, Novgorod, Pskov, and Tver garrisons) (316).

l) In the Moscow Inspectorate: (Illus. 1247g and 1247h): 16 June—20 to Graf Lieven 1st’s Garrison Regiment (made up of the Archangel, Vladimir, and Nizhnii-Novgorod garrisons) (317).

Flags of the Taurica and Moscow Grenadier Regiments, as well as of the Archangel, Smolensk, and Kabarda Musketeer Regiments, differed from the others described above in having—above the eagle in the circle, in gold on a sky-blue field—inscriptions detailing distinguished services rendered by these regiments in battles with the enemy. These inscriptions were:

a) Taurica Regiment—“Za vzyatie znamya v srazhenii protiv frantsuzov v Gollandii pod g. Bergenom 1799 goda” [“For capturing a flag in battle against the French in Holland at Bergen in 1799”] (Illus. 1248) (318).

b) Moscow Regiment—“Za vzyatie znamya u frantsuzov pri Trebii i Nure 1799 goda” [“For capturing a flag from the French at Trebia and the Nura 1799”] (319).

c) Archangel Regiment—“Za vzyatie Frantsuzskago znamya na gorakh Alpiiskikh” [“For capturing a French flag in the Alps”] (320).

d) Smolensk Regiment—“ Za vzyatie Frantsuzskago znamya na gorakh Alpiiskikh” [“For capturing a French flag in the Alps”] (321).

e) Kabarda Regiment—“Za vzyatie u Avarskikh voisk znamya pri reki Iore, 7-go Noyabrya 1800” [“For capturing a flag from the Avar forces at the Iora River, 7 November 1800”] (322).

In the same year of 1800 flags were granted to Baron Sprengporten’s and Saken 1st’s Musketeer Regiments, designated to be formed, but no information has been preserved regarding exact patterns and in what numbers (323).


II. In Cuirassier regiments.


Standards [shtandarty] granted to Cuirassier regiments in 1797, 1798, and 1799, on the same basis and made of the same material as for the infantry flags described above, were rectangular and measured 37-3/4 inches (10 vershkov) wide, at the staff, and 45 inches [12 vershkov] long. In the middle of the cloth, in the lower corner nearest the staff, was an embroidered image of a two-headed eagle in ascent, and in the upper corner opposite was a cross giving off rays. On all four corners are monograms of EMPEROR PAUL I within laurels and under crowns. Along the sides, between the monograms, were embroidered edges and laurel leaves, and a fringe was sewn to the three edges not touching the pole (Illus. 1249). The poles of the standards were, as before, green with gold stripes. The spearhead was gilded and had a two-headed eagle; the base was gilt; silver cords and tassels, with black and orange silk; gold embroidery and fringe, or silver, as explained above; gold or silver laurels around the monograms, according to the color of the embroidery and fringe (324).

The standards in each Cuirassier regiment were five, according to the number of squadrons. Those given to the first or honorary colonels’ [shefskii] squadrons were white with colored fields behind the monograms, these being the so-called corners, almost always the same color as that of the field for the remaining four standards (Illus. 1249).

The standards granted to Cuirassier regiments during EMPEROR PAUL I’s reign were as follows:

HIS MAJESTY’S Leib-Cuirassiers – (25 June 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1249a); the rest with a sky-blue field and white corners (Illus. 1249b); silver embroidery and fringe (325).

HER MAJESTY’S Leib-Cuirassiers – (25 June 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and raspberry corners (Illus. 1250a); the rest with a raspberry field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1250b); silver embroidery and fringe (326).

Military Order Cuirassiers – (23 September 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and black corners (Illus. 1250c); the rest with a black field and white corners (Illus. 1250d); gold embroidery and fringe (327).

Yekaterinoslav Cuirassiers – (9 January 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1250e); the rest with an orange field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1250f); silver embroidery and fringe (328).

Kazan Cuirassiers – (23 September 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and crimson corners (Illus. 1250g); the rest with a green field and crimson corners (Illus. 1250h); gold embroidery and fringe (329).

Ryazan Cuirassiers – (26 February 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1250i); the rest with a sky-blue field and white corners (Illus. 1250k); gold embroidery and fringe (330).

Yamburg Cuirassiers – (26 February 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and green corners (Illus. 12501); the rest with a green field and white corners (Illus. 1250m); gold embroidery and fringe (331).

Glukhov Cuirassiers – (26 February 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and coffee-colored corners (Illus. 1251a); the rest with a coffee-colored field and orange corners (Illus. 1251b); silver embroidery and fringe (332).

Kiev Cuirassiers – (23 September 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and straw-colored corners (Illus. 1251c); the rest with a straw-colored field and violet corners (Illus. 1251d); silver embroidery and fringe (333).

Nezhin Cuirassiers – (25 February 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and white corners (Illus. 1251e); the rest with puce field and white corners (Illus. 1251f); gold embroidery and fringe (334).

Sofiya Cuirassiers – (9 January 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1251g); the rest with an orange field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1251h); gold embroidery and fringe (335).

Starodub Cuirassiers – (23 September 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and dark-green corners (Illus. 1251i); the rest with a dark-green field and white corners (Illus. 1251k); silver embroidery and fringe (336).

Chernigov Cuirassiers – (10 February 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and puce corners (Illus. 1251l); the rest with a yellow field and puce corners (Illus. 1251m); silver embroidery and fringe (337).

Riga Cuirassiers – (23 September 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1252a); the rest with a coffee-colored field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1252b); gold embroidery and fringe (338).

Kharkov Cuirassiers – (11 February 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and pink corners (Illus. 1252c); the rest with a pink field and puce corners (Illus. 1252d); silver embroidery and fringe (339).

Little-Russia Cuirassiers – (11 February 1798) 5 standards: one with a white field and violet corners (Illus. 1252e); the rest with a violet field and light-green corners (Illus. 1252f); gold embroidery and fringe (340).

Friderici’s Cuirassiers – (19 July 1799) 5 standards: one with a white field and lilac corners (Illus. 1252g); the rest with a lilac field and orange corners (Illus. 1252h); gold embroidery and fringe (341).

Neplyuev’s Cuirassiers – (19 July 1799) 5 standards: one with a white field and siskin-green corners (Illus. 1252i); the rest with a raspberry field and siskin-green corners (Illus. 1252k); silver embroidery and fringe (342).

Zorn’s Cuirassiers – (19 July 1799) 5 standards: one with a white field and yellow corners (Illus. 1252l); the rest with a yellow field and red corners (Illus. 1252m); gold embroidery and fringe (343).



III. In Dragoon regiments.


Since 1797 Dragoon regiments began to receive standards in place of their previous flags. They measured 45 inches [12 vershkov] in both width and height, and were of a pattern like that for infantry flags but with the eagle and laurels embroidered rather than drawn, and with the addition of a fringe (Illus. 1253). Poles with all their fittings were the same as for cuirassier standards (344).

Standards were granted to Dragoon regiments according to the number of squadrons. In the first or honorary colonel’s squadron—with a white cross, and in the other squadrons—with a colored cross, as follows:

Vladimir Dragoons – (21 January 1799) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half pink and half sky-blue (Illus. 1253a); the rest with a pink cross and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1253b); gold fringe (345).

Astrakhan Dragoons – (7 December 1797) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half sky-blue and half straw-colored (Illus. 1254a); the rest with a straw-colored cross and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1254b); silver fringe (346).

Nizhnii-Novgorod Dragoons – (21 January 1799) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half orange and half black (Illus. 1254c); the rest with a white cross with three light-orange stripes, and black corners (Illus. 1254d); silver fringe (347).

Pskov Dragoons – (6 September 1798) 5 standards: one with a white cross and yellow corners (Illus. 1254e); the rest with a yellow cross and white corners (Illus. 1254f); gold fringe (348).

St.-Petersburg Dragoons – (26 March 1798) 5 standards: one with a white cross and celadon-green corners (Illus. 1254g); the rest with a celadon-green cross and white corners (Illus. 1254h); gold fringe (349).

Smolensk Dragoons – (25 August 1798) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half violet and half orange (Illus. 1254i); the rest with an orange cross and violet corners (Illus. 1254k); gold fringe (350).

Taganrog Dragoons – (21 January 1799) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half straw-colored and half crimson (Illus. 1254l); the rest with a crimson cross and straw-colored corners (Illus. 1254m); gold fringe (351).

Irkutsk Dragoons – (20 November 1797) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half sky-blue and half puce (Illus. 1255a); the rest with a sky-blue cross and puce corners (Illus. 1255b); gold fringe (352).

Orenburg Dragoons – (20 November 1797) 5 standards: one with a white cross and puce corners (Illus. 1255c); the rest with a puce cross and white corners (Illus. 1255d); gold fringe (353).

Siberia Dragoons – (20 November 1797) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half crimson and half celadon-green (Illus. 1255e); the rest with a crimson cross and celadon-green corners (Illus. 1255f); gold fringe (354).

Ingermanland Dragoons – (4 May 1798) 5 standards: one with a white cross and raspberry corners (Illus. 1255g); the rest with a raspberry cross and white corners (Illus. 1255h); gold fringe (355).

Narva Dragoons – (21 January 1799) 5 standards: one with a white cross and violet corners (Illus. 1255i); the rest with a violet cross and white corners (Illus. 1255k); silver fringe (356).

Rostov Dragoons – (3 May 1798) 5 standards: one with a white cross and dark-blue corners (Illus. 1255l); the rest with a dark-blue cross and white corners (Illus. 1255m); silver fringe (357).

Moscow Dragoons – (3 May 1798) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half orange and half sky-blue (Illus. 1256a); the rest with an orange cross and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1256b); silver fringe (358).

Seversk Dragoons – (26 February 1798) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half black and half orange (Illus. 1256c); the rest with an orange cross and black corners (Illus. 1256d); silver fringe (359).

Kargopol Dragoons – (25 June 1798) 5 standards: one with a white cross and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1256e); the rest with a sky-blue cross and white corners (Illus. 1256f); silver fringe (360).

Schreider’s Dragoons – (19 July 1799) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half white and half dark-green (Illus. 1256g); the rest with a white cross on a dark-green cross, and white corners (Illus. 1256h); gold fringe (361).

Khastatov’s Dragoons – (19 July 1799) 5 standards: one with a white cross and corners half very dark-blue and half puce (Illus. 1256i); the rest with awhite cross on a puce cross, and very dark-blue corners (Illus. 1256k); silver fringe (362).

In 1800 the ten-squadron Dragoon regiments of Skalon, Pushkin, and Obrezkov, formed from the Irkutsk, Siberia, Narva, Nizhnii-Novgorod, Vladimir, and Taganrog Dragoons Regiments, were each granted ten new standards: in the first squadrons—white with green corners, and in the other squadrons—green with white corners. In appearance and dimensions they were like cuirassier standards except with the inscriptions “S nami Bog” and “Blagodat’” in place of embroidery, and on the corners of the field as well as on the pole’s spearhead—a double monogram, i.e. with two Cyrillic P’s laid crosswise over each other. These monograms, and all embroidery and fringe in general, were gold (Illust. 1257) (363). Skalon’s regiment (from the Irkutsk and Siberia) received such standards on 26 May (364); Pushkin’s regiment (from the Narva and Nizhnii-Novgorod)—on 16 June (365); and Obrezkov’s (from the Vladimir and Taganrog)—on 22 June (366).


IV. In the Guards.


a) In the Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments:

EMPEROR PAUL I granted the regiments of Guards Infantry flags of the same size and pattern as for Army Infantry, but with some changes in the depicted images.

In December 1796 the Preobrazhenskii Regiment received 15 flags, the Semenovskii 10, and the Izmailovskii 10. In the first companies these had white cross and in the other companies yellow crosses, always with corners the same color as the regiment’s collars, i.e. in the first regiment—red (Illus. 1258a), in the second—sky-blue (Illus. 1258b), and in the third—green (Illus. 1258c). Gold crowns were in the corners of all these flags; along the edges between crowns—green laurel branches; in the middle, in a circle surrounded by laurel branches tied with a sky-blue ribbon—an image of a Keizer-flag, and above the circle, on a silver field—gold inscriptions, on one side “Sim znameniem pobedishi” [“With this flag you shall conquer”], and on the other “Ne nam, ne nam, a imeni Tvoemu” [“Not for ourselves, but in Thy name”]. Poles were coffee-colored for all flags (367).

1798 January 2 – Flags were granted to the Leib-battalions of the above regiments. All had gold crowns on the corners, the same inscriptions as on the above flags, and the same circles and eagles as on the flags for Grenadier, Musketeer, and Garrison regiments in 1797, 1798, and 1799:

Leib-Battalion of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment—5 flags; one with a white cross and puce corners (Illus. 1259a); four with a puce cross and white corners (Illus. 1260a); for all—coffee-colored poles (368).

Leib-Battalion of the Semenovskii Regiment—5 flags; one with a white cross and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1259b); four with a sky-blue cross and white corners (Illus. 1260b); for all—coffee-colored poles (369).

Leib-Battalion of the Izmailovskii Regiment—5 flags; one with a white cross and green corners (Illus. 1259c); four with a green cross and white corners (Illus. 1260c); for all—coffee-colored poles (370).

1798 December 16 – On this date, i.e. the day EMPEROR PAUL I assumed the title of Grand Master of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, the white crosses of this order were sewn onto all the above guards flags (371).

1799 January 6 – To replace all the above flags from both 1796 and 1798, Guards infantry regiments received new ones with the same inscriptions, circles, eagles, and Maltese crosses as before, with the addition of a gold monograms in the corners and inscriptions “Blagodat’” [“Blessed”].

Preobrazhenskii Regiment—25 flags; one with a raspberry cross on a white cross, and white corners (Illus. 1261a); the rest with a white cross on a raspberry cross, and raspberry corners (Illus. 1262a); for all—coffee-colored poles; spearheads with a double monograms (372).

Semenovskii Regiment—15 flags; one with a sky-blue cross on a white cross, and white corners (Illus. 1261b); the rest with a white cross on a sky-blue cross, and white corners (Illus. 1262b); for all—black poles; spearheads with a double monograms (373).

Izmailovskii Regiment—15 flags; one with a green cross on a white cross, and green corners (Illus. 1261c); the rest with a white cross on a green cross, and white corners (Illus. 1262c); for all—white poles; spearheads with a double monograms (374).

In 1800, when the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment was reduced in size by one battalion, the number of flags in the regiment was reduced by five. In this same year new flags were granted to all three regiments of Guards Infantry, of the pattern established in 1800 for Army Infantry and Garrison regiments, except with double-monograms in the corners. In honorary colonels’ companies, the cross on the flag was white, the corners half puce and half white (Illus. 1263a); in the other companies there was a white cross on a puce cross, and white corners (Illus. 1263b). Along with this the color of the poles was changed, and from this time they were: in the Leib-Battalion of the Preobrazhenskii Regiment—coffee-colored, in the other battalions of the regiment—straw-colored; in the Semenovskii Regiment—black; in the Izmailovskii Regiment—white (375).

 

b) In the Cavalier Guards Corps and Regiment:

The Cavalier Guards squadrons formed in 1797 and disbanded in that same year did not have standards.

The Cavalier Guards Corps established in 1799 was granted at its very beginning elongated rectangular standards of raspberry material [stoff] with a white cross in the center and silver fringe. The standard was attached to the black horizontal bar with gilt clamps at its ends. The flat side of the clamps was decorated with a cross of St. John of Jerusalem (Illus. 1264a). This crossbar was held at its two ends by a silver cord intermixed with gold & black and orange & raspberry silk. The cord was passed through the standard’s center pole on which instead of a spearhead was a white cross of St. John of Jerusalem resting on a gold ball (376).

Soon after the Cavalier Guards Regiment was formed, in the first half of 1800, three puce standards with black corners and a white Maltese cross were granted. These had gold edges and fringes (Illus. 1264b). Within the spearhead was a Maltese cross of white enamel in a gold frame (377). In the same year of 1800, except at its close, these standards were replaced with three new ones fastened to a black horizontal pole on whose ends were silver clamps with rings. This cross piece hung from two silver chains going to the left beak and talons of a two-headed silver eagle resting on a silver ball at the top of the standard’s upright pole (Illus. 1264c). The pattern, size, and colors of these standards are not known (378).

 

c) For the Life-Guards Horse Regiment, EMPEROR PAUL I granted Cuirassier-pattern standards three times:

1796 December – 5 standards; one with a white field and orange corners (Illus. 1265a); the rest with an orange field and dark-blue corners (Illus. 1265b); gold embroidery and fringe (379).

1798 – 10 standards with inscriptions: on one side—“Sim znameniem pobedishi,” and on the other—“Ne nam, ne nam, a imeni Tvoemu.” One standard had a white field and raspberry corners (Illus. 1265c), and the rest had a raspberry and straw-colored corners (Illus. 1265d); gold inscriptions, embroidery, and fringe (380). [Note: "Ne nam, ne nam, a imeni Tvoemu" is from Psalm 115, "Not to us, O Lord, not to us, but to your name." M.C.]

1799 – 10 standards with inscriptions: one one side—“S nami Bog,” and on the other—“Blagodat’.” One standard had a white field and raspberry corners (Illus. 1265e), and the rest a raspberry field and straw-colored corners (Illus. 1265f); gold inscriptions, embroidery, and fringe (381).

 

d) In the Leib-Cossack Regiment:

1799 January 6 – The Leib-Cossack Regiment was granted two flags of an antiquated banner style [v rode starinnykh praporov] measuring: along the pole—17.5 inches [10 vershkov], length—54 1/4 inches [1 arshin 15 vershkov]. One of these flags, in the first squadron, was white with a gold fringe and a raspberry cross emitting gold rays (Illus. 1265g). The other—in the second squadron—was raspberry with a silver fringe, white cross, and silver rays (Illus. 1265h). The poles for these flags, as well as their spearheads, cords, and tassels, were the same as for standards in Cuirassier and Dragoon regiments (382).

1799 June 6 – The regiment was granted a third standard similar to the second (383).


V. In Military Educational Establishments.


1798 November 2 – Four flags were granted to the Army Cadet Corps [Sukhoputnyi Kadetskii Korpus] that in appearance and size were like army flags, but with the addition in the corners of the corps coat of arms that had been established as early as 1732. It consisted of a gold scepter of Mercury crossed over a gold sword. On one flag the cross was white and the corners half puce and half straw-colored (Illus. 1266a); for three flags the cross was puce and the corners straw-colored (Illus. 1266b); for all the poles were coffee-colored (384).


VI. In Cossack Hosts.


1798 April 19 – Six flags were granted to the Ural Host, made of white cloth with images painted on both sides with oil paints: the Uncreated Savior, the Archangel Michael, St. Mercurius the Martyr, and St. John the Warrior. In the space between the images, like the shape of a cross and edged with sky-blue material, were sewn five gold stars and four gold monograms of EMPEROR PAUL I, under crowns. Between the edges of the cross and the images was a border of gold galloon with likewise gold inscriptions: “Sim znameniem pobedishi” (Illus. 1267). Around the whole flag was sewn, also in gold, a glazet brocade border with gold fringe along it on three sides. The pole, spearhead, cords, and tassels were exactly like those described above for regular cavalry standards (385).

1798 August 10 – Flags were granted to both Chuguev regiments. The pattern and size were as for the Leib-Cossacks but all with a red cross. In the 1st Regiment one flag was white and nine sky-blue, with gold rays and fringe (Illus. 1268a and 1268b); in the 2nd Regiment one flag was white and nine green, with silver rays and fringe (Illus. 1268c and 1268d) (386).

1799 January 4 – With his own hands EMPEROR PAUL I granted a flag to the Leib-Ural Sotnia, of the pattern of the flags received by the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment on 6 January 1799, except without the inscription “Blagodat’,” i.e. this flag had a white cross on a raspberry cross, and raspberry corners (Illus. 1268e) (387).

1800 February 15 – A flag was granted to the Don Host, made of white cloth with gold fringe on three sides. It had gold monograms of EMPEROR PAUL I in the corners, within laurel branches tied with sky-blue ribbons, and under two gold crowns: Russian and Maltese. On one side of the flag, in the center in a gold circle surrounded by gold laurel branches tied with a sky-blue ribbon that had gold edges, was a two-headed Russian eagle under an IMPERIAL crown (Illus. 1269). On the other side in a silver circle surrounded by gold laurel branches with a sky-blue ribbon was depicted a gold radiant cross (Illus. 1269). On each side of the flag, over the eagle and cross, on a black ribbon with silver edges, was inscribed in silver Cyrillic letters: “Vernopoddannomu Voisku Donskomu za okazannyya zaslugi v prodolzhenie kampanii protiv frantsuzov 1799 goda” [“To the loyally subject Don Host for services rendered in the continuation of the campaign against the French in the year 1799”] (388).



VII. In National Forces.


1798 September 15 – The Lithuanian-Tatar and Polish Horse Regiments were each granted 10 flags like that for the Leib-Cossacks, with silver fringe. In the Lithuanian-Tatar Regiment one flag was white and nine sky-blue; all had gold eagles and radiant crosses as on standards for Cuirassier regiments (Illus. 1270a and 1270b). In the Polish Regiment one flag was white and nine puce; all had a crimson cross with gold radiation (Illus. 1270c and 1270d) (389).

1799 January 15 – Flags and standards were granted to the Prince Condé’s Corps. The flags were like those granted to Russian infantry regiments in 1797, 1798, and 1799, except with gold lilies in the corners instead of monograms. The standards were patterned after those for Russian dragoons and also had gold lilies in the corners. In regard to colors, these flags and standards were as follows:


a) Prince Condé’s French Noble Regiment - one flag with white cross and corners (Illus. 1271a); nine flags with a white cross on a black cross, and white corners (Illus. 1271b); coffee-colored poles (390).

b) Duke de Bourbon’s French Grenadier Regiment- one flag with a white cross and orange corners (Illus. 1271c); nine flags with a white cross on an orange cross, and puce corners (Illus. 1271d); coffee-colored poles (391).

c) Duke of Hohenlohe’s German Regiment - one flag with a white cross and black corners (Illus. 1271e); nine flags with a white cross on a black cross, and dark-blue corners (Illus. 12171f); coffee-colored poles (392).

d) Duke de Berry’s Noble Dragoon Regiment - one standard with a white field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1271g); four standards with a black field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 12171h); silver embroidery and fringe (393).

e) Duke d’Enghien’s Dragoon Regiment Regiment - one standard with a white field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 1271i); four standards with a yellow field and sky-blue corners (Illus. 12171k); silver embroidery and fringe (394).


1800 February 16 – For distinction shown in battle with French republican forces “at Constance”, the Duke de Bourbon’s Grenadier Regimentwas granted new flags with an inscription explaining this honor, but the exact wording is unknown (395).



VIII. In the Senate Battalion.


1799 – The Senate Battalion was granted five flags of the pattern for all infantry flags of that time. One flag had a white cross and corners that were half orange and half black (Illus. 1272a); four flags had a cross half orange and half white, and corners half black and half raspberry (Illus. 1272b); black poles(396).



During the reign of EMPEROR PAUL I, flags were not received by: in the Guards—Life-Guards Jäger, Artillery, and Garrison battalions; in the Army—Jäger, Hussar, Artillery, and Pioneer regiments; among Military Educational establishments—2nd Cadet Corps, Shklov Cadet Corps, and IMPERIAL Military Orphans’ Home; and from National troops—the Greek Balaclava Battalion. The only Cossack troops granted flags were those mentioned above, namely: Ural and Don Hosts, Leib-Ural Sotnia, and both Chuguev regiments.




INSIGNIA FOR DISTINCTION

[ZNAKI OTLICHII]


1796 November 12 – For non-commissioned officers and privates who served 20 years without reproach, there was established the St.-Anne medal [znak otlichiya Sv. Anny], being a gilded silver medal on whose face was a red cross inside a red rim and under a gold crown, and on whose reverse was again a red rim within which was inscribed the serial number of the award (Illus. 1273a). This insignia was prescribed to be worn in a coat’s buttonhole on a red ribbon with yellow edges (397).

1798 February 5 – Silver trumpets and kettledrums awarded to regiments were ordered to be considered regalia (398).

1800 October 10 – It was ordered that lower military ranks who had previously earned the St.-Anne medal were to be awarded Donatives of the order of St. John of Jerusalem [Donaty ordena Sv. Ioanna Ierusalimskago], i.e. a brass cross with lilies in the corners and the serial number on the back (Illus. 1273b). This cross was worn in a buttonhole on a black ribbon (399).


During the reign of EMPEROR PAUL I the orders of St. George the Martyr and St. Vladimir 4th class with bow were not awarded, and military deeds by generals and field and company-grade officers were rewarded by the orders of St. Anne 1st, 2nd, and 3rd classes, and St. John of Jerusalem, which were also given for services by civil officials. The orders of St. Andrew the First-Called Apostle and St. Alexander Nevsky were reserved, as before, for higher general officers.

Distinctions established by EMPEROR PAUL I for military deeds not by individuals but by military units as a whole included: inscriptions on flags and the grenadier march or drumbeat [grenaderskii pokhod ili boi].

Inscriptions on flags that described a military feat were, as already related above, granted to the following units:

1800 February 15 – To the Don Host, with the inscription: ““To the loyally subject Don Host for services rendered in the continuation of the campaign against the French in the year 1799.”

1800 February 16 – To the Duke de Bourbon’s Grenadier Regiment for distinction at Constance,” but the exact words are unknown.

1800 February 28 – To the Archangel Musketeer Regiment, with the inscription “For capturing a French flag in the Alps.”

1800 March 6 - To the Moscow Grenadier Regiment, with the inscription “For capturing a flag from the French at Trebia and the Nura 1799.”

1800 March 17 – To the Smolensk Musketeer Regiment, with the inscription “For capturing a French flag in the Alps.”

1800 March 30 – To the Taurica Grenadier Regiment, with the inscription “For capturing a flag in battle against the French in Holland at Bergen in 1799.”

1800 December 17 – To the Kabarda Musketeer Regiment, with the inscription “For capturing a flag from the Avar forces at the Iora River, 7 November 1800.”


On 16 July 1799, the Grenadier march was awarded to the following regiments that served in Italy under the command of Generalissimus Prince Suvorov: Apsheron, Smolensk, Archangel, Orel, Tula, Tambov, Nizovsk, and Butyrsk Musketeer Regiments, and the 7th and 8th Jäger Regiments (400). This distinction had been granted to two more Musketeer regiments, the Yelets and Ryazhsk—to the first in 1797 for maneuvers carried out in the HIGHEST presence near the town of Narva (401), and to the second on 14 May 1798 for pacifying peasants at the village of Brasov in Orel Province in February of 1797 (402).


This enumeration of awards established and granted by EMPEROR PAUL I for the services and deeds of units as a whole and of individuals in particular brings an end to the 100-year period from the time EMPEROR PETER I definitely reformed Russia’s military forces to EMPEROR ALEXANDER I’s ascension to the throne. With the turn of the new, 19th, century, there began again a new epoch for the Russian Army.



END OF PART NINE.



NOTES


(1) Chronicle of the Russian IMPERIAL Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov and issued by HIGHESTOrder, St. Petersburg, 1797, No. 1; HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry for the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments, 10 July 1798; drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library catalogued under Nos. 158 and 159, and statements by contemporaries.
(2) The tables mentioned in the preceding note, and actual halberds preserved in various arsenals.
(3) According to the tables mentioned above in Note 1, halberd shafts were to be the same color as flag poles, but the latter, as can be seen from drawings in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library under No 158, were coffee-colored.
(4) The tables mentioned above in Note 1.
(5) The tables of 10 July 1798 mentioned above in Note 1, and the drawings of No 158.
(6) The tables mentioned above in Note 1, and a general note confirmed 17 February 1797 by HIGHEST Authority for the Commissariat regarding infantry uniforms.
(7) The tables mentioned above in Note 1 and statements by contemporaries.
(8) Chronicle of the Russian IMPERIAL Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos. 1, 3, and 5; tables and drawings under Nos 158 and 159, mentioned above in Note 1, and statements by contemporaries.
(9) The tables mentioned above in Note 1.
(10) A general note confirmed 17 February 1797 by HIGHEST Authority for the Commissariat regarding infantry uniforms, and statements by contemporaries.
(11) Short Historical Journal of the Life-Guards Semenovskii Regiment, compiled by the regiment in 1825.
(12) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos. 2, 4 and 6.
(13) Ibid.
(14) Ibid., and statements by contemporaries.
(15) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 5, and HIGHEST confirmed tables of uniforms, accouterments, and weaponry for the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii, Semenovskii, and Izmailovskii Regiments, 10 July 1798.
(16) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos. 1, 3, and 5, Complete Collection of Laws of the Russian Empire [Polnoe Sobranie Zakonov Rossiiskoi Imperii, hereafter PSZ], Vol. XXV, No 18,790, pg. 486; actual grenadier caps and officers’ gorgets in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’s Own Arsenal, and statements by contemporaries.
(17) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6, the tables cited above in Note 15, and statements by contemporaries.
(18) PSZ, Vol. XXV, No 19,075, pg. 755; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos. 2, 4, and 6, and actual grenadier caps in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’s Own Arsenal.
(19) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 2.
(20) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, Part II, section four, under information on uniforms, page 3, No 19,178, and statements by contemporaries.
(21) Drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library catalogued under No. 177, sheets 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6; table of uniforms of Russian forces, March 1800, compiled by Major General Prince Dolgorukov and located in the SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Library, catalogued under No 327; actual uniform clothing preserved in the personal arsenals of HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR and HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH , and statements by contemporaries.
(22) Ditto.
(23) Ditto.
(24) Ditto.
(25) Ditto.
(26) Actual uniform preserved in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH ’s Own Arsenal, and statements by contemporaries.
(27) Actual coat and hat preserved in the armory of the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment, and statements by contemporaries.
(28) Actual drum preserved in the SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Arsenal, and statements by contemporaries.
(29) Drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library catalogued under Nos. 158 and 159; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 225, and a HIGHEST Confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Jäger battalion, 10 July 1798.
(30) HIGHEST Confirmed tables of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Life-Guards Garrison Battalion, 29 July 1799 and 10 July 1800; grenadier caps of this battalion, preserved in IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Arsenal, and statements by contemporaries.
(31) Ditto.
(32) Ditto.
(33) Drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library, and statements by contemporaries.
(34) Ditto.
(35) Ditto.
(36) Ditto.
(37) Ditto.
(38) Actual supervests and parade horse harness preserved in the personal arsenals of HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR and HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH .
(39) Drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library under No. 159; actual armor, gauntlets, thigh pieces, and shishka helmet preserved in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Arsenal, in the Anichkov Palace, and statements by contemporaries.
(40) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Cavalier Guards Corps, 6 April 1799; also a table of uniforms from March 1800 compiled by Major General Prince Dolgorukov and locacted in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library under No 327.
(41) Ditto.
(42) Ditto.
(43) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 160; drawings in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library, as mentioned in the preceding three notes.
(44) HIGHEST Confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Cavalier Guards Corps, 6 August 1799; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 160; by the same Prince Dolgorukov, table of uniforms, March 1800, located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library under No 327, and statements by contemporaries.
(45) The same sources as in the preceding note, and also an actual helmet preserved in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Arsenal, in the Anichkov Palace.
(46) The same sources as in Note 43, and also an actual undress coat preserved in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH ’s Own Arsenal.
(47) The same sources as in Note 43.
(48) Ditto.
(49) Ditto.
(50) The table cited in Note 43, and actual papers regarding the uniforms for the Cavalier Guards Corps, preserved in the Moscow Section of the Archive of the War Ministry’s Inspection Department.
(51) The same sources as in Note 43.
(52) Table of uniforms, March 1800, cited above in Notes 40, 41, and 42.
(53) HIGHESTConfirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Cavalier Guards Corps, 15 May 1800; actual items preserved in the personal arsenals of HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR and HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH ; and statements by contemporaries.
(54) Ditto.
(55) Ditto.
(56) Ditto.
(57) Actual papers regarding the uniforms for the Cavalier Guards Corps in 1800, preserved in the Moscow Section of the Archive of the War Ministry’s Inspection Department; an officer’s uniform preserved in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH ’s Own Arsenal.
(58) The papers cited in the preceding note, and the table cited in Notes 53, 54, 55, and 56.
(59) The same papers and statements by contemporaries. In HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH ’s Own Arsenal is an undress coat of the Life-Guards Horse Regiment from this time, of the same pattern as for the Cavalier Guards except with dark-blue lapels and cuffs instead of green, and gold buttons instead of silver.
(60) Drawings of guards coats in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library catalogued under No 158, and a HIGHESTConfirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Life-Guards Horse Regiment, 10 July 1798.
(61) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 161, and statements by contemporaries.
(62) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 161, and an actual officer’s undress uniform preserved in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH’s Own Arsenal.
(63) Complete Collection of Laws of the Russian Empire [Polnoe Sobranie Zakonov Rossiiskoi Imperii, hereafter PSZ], Vol. XXIV, No 18,837, pg. 548, and statements by contemporaries.
(64) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, Part II, Sect. Four, under information on uniforms page 3, No. 19,178, and statements by contemporaries.
(65) HIGHESTConfirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons, 2 February 1800, and table of of uniforms, March 1800, compiled by Major General Prince Dolgorukov, in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library catalogued under No 327.
(66) Statements by contemporaries and an actual undress coat preserved HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH’s Own Arsenal.
(67) HIGHESTConfirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Leib-Hussar-Cossack Regiment, 13 December 1796; drawings in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library catalogued under Nos 158 and 159; actual Leib-Hussar uniform clothing preserved in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH’s Own Arsenal, , and statements by contemporaries.
(68) The table cited in the preceding note, and statements by contemporaries.
(69) Ditto.
(70) The drawings cited above in Note 67; barsyand sarsamypreserved in the personal arsenals of HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR and HISIMPERIALHIGHNESSGRANDDUKEMICHAELPAVLOVICH; and statements by contemporaries.
(71) The table and drawings cited above in Note 67, and statements by contemporaries.
(72) The same tabel and statements.
(73) HIGHESTConfirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Leib-Hussar Regiment, 10 July 1798.
(74) Ukase from the Government Military Collegium to the Commissariat Department, 13 October 1798.
(75) A similar ukase of 20 October 1798, and statements by contemporaries.
(76) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 246, and statements by contemporaries.
(77) PSZ Vol. XXIV, No 18,837, pg. 548, and statements by contemporaries.
(78) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, Part II, Sect. Four, under information on uniforms page 3, No 19,178, and statements by contemporaries.
(79) Ukase from the Government Military Collegium to the Commissariat Department, 22 November 1799.
(80) A similar ukase of 11 June 1800.
(81) HIGHESTConfirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Leib-Hussar-Cossack Regiment, 13 December 1796; drawings in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library catalogued under Nos 158, 159, and 327; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 203, and statements by contemporaries.
(82) The table cited in the preceding note, and statements by contemporaries.
(83) Ditto.
(84) Ditto.
(85) The drawings cited in Note 81; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 213, and statements by contemporaries.
(86) The same sources as cited in Note 81.
(87) Ditto.
(88) HIGHEST Confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Leib-Cossack Regiment, 10 July 1798.
(89) The drawings cited above in Note 81; HIGHEST Confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Life-Guards Artillery Battalion; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 208, and statements by contemporaries.
(90) The drawings cited above in Note 81; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 7; HIGHEST Confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Army Cadet Corps, 10 March 1799, and statements by contemporaries.
(91) Ditto.
(92) Ditto.
(93) Ditto.
(94) Ditto.
(95) The drawings cited in Note 81; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 224, and statements by contemporaries.
(96) HIGHEST confirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the IMPERIAL Military Orphans’ Home and its Sections, 23 December 1798, and statements by contemporaries.
(97) Ditto.
(98) Ditto.
(99) Ditto.
(100) PSZ Vol. XLIV, Part II, Sect. Four, under information on uniforms, page 3, No 19,178, and statements by contemporaries.
(101) Statements from persons who served in the 1st and 2nd Cadet Corps during the reign of EMPERORPAULI; drawings of uniforms of the 2nd Cadet Corps executed in the HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS the Inspector-General for Engineering’s Own Drafting Establishment; drawings of uniforms executed in March 1800 by Maj.-Gen. Prince Dolgorukov and located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library catalogued under No 327, and PSZ, Vol. XLIV, Part II, Sect. IV, pgs. 2 and 4, No 19,379.
(102) The same books from PSZ and on the same pages, No 19,382.
(103) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos 204 and 205, and drawings of uniforms located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library, catalogued under No 159.
(104) PSZ, Vol. XLIII, Pt. I, Sect. One, No 18,701, pg. 50.
(105) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 202; the uniform drawings cited above in Note 101, and drawings of the same uniforms located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library, catalogued under No 246.
(106) PSZ, Vol. XLIII, Pt. I, Sect. One, No 17,993, pg. 23; Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 206, and drawings of uniforms of the Lithuanian-Tatar Regiment located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library in portfolio No 168.
(107) Ditto.
(108) Ditto.
(109) Ditto.
(110) Ditto.
(111) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 207, and drawings of uniforms of the Polish Horse Regiment located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library in portfolio No 168.
(112) Ditto.
(113) Ditto.
(114) Ditto.
(115) PSZ Vol. XLIII, pt. I, first section, No 17,915, pg. 20, and description, with drawings, of the uniform of the Balaklava Greek Battalion, received from the battalion Commander in August 1840.
(116) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 156, and this same number in the drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library, catalogued under No 177.
(117) Ditto, No 157.
(118) Ditto, No 158.
(119) Ditto, No 194.
(120) Ditto, No 195.
(121) PSZ, Vol. XLIII, pt. I, first section, No 17,781, pg. 12, and drawings of uniforms located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library, catalogued under Nos 159 and 327.
(122) HIGHESTConfirmed table of uniforms, accouterments, and weapons for the Senate Battalion, Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 159, and this same number in the drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library, catalogued under No 177.
(123) PSZ, Vol. XLIII, pt. I, first section, pg. 7; Vol. XLIV, pt. II, fourth section, No 17,987, pg. 301; Vol. XLIII, pt. I, first section, No 18,232, pg. 26, and No 18,308, pg. 28; Vol. XLIV, pt. II, fourth section, No 18,491, pg. 317; No 18,938, pg. 327 et seq., and No 19,189, pg. 351.
(124) Drawings located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library, catalogued under No 159.
(125) HIGHESTConfirmed organization tables for provinces: 31 December 1796; 6, 19, and 26 February, and 4 March, 1797.
(126) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, pt. II, fourth section, pgs. 2 and 5; No 18,699.
(127) Ibid., pgs. 1 and 4, Nos. 17,557 and 17,662.
(128) Ibid, pgs. 1 and 3, No 17,653; drawings located in HIS MAJESTY THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library, catalogued under No 327, and statements from contemporaries.
(129) Ibid., pgs. 2 and 4, No 17,555, and statements from contemporaries.
(130) Ibid, pgs. 2 and 4, No 18,342.
(131) Ibid., pgs. 2 and 4, No 18,810, and statements from contemporaries.
(132) Drawings of Russian military uniforms in 1800, compiled by Maj.-Gen. Prince Dolgorukov and located in HIS MAJESTY THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library, catalogued under No 327, and statements from contemporaries.
(133) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, pt. II, fourth section, pgs. 2 and 4; No 19,391.
(134) The drawings cited in Note 132, and statements from contemporaries.
(135) Ditto.
(136) Ditto.
(137) Ditto.
(138) PSZ, Vol. XLIV, pt. II, fourth section, pgs. 1 and 4; No 17,619.
(139) Ibid., pgs. 1 and 4, No 17,642.
(140) Ibid., pgs. 2 and 5, No 18,122.
(141) There were no special rules for making flags, or at least none were found. Everything stated here about their dimensions and appearance is based on flags from the time of EMPERORPAUL I preserved up to now, in drawings as well as in actual items.
(142) Chronicle of the Russian Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 8, and this same number in the drawings of flags and standards accompanying this Chronicle and located in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY's Own Library, catalogued under No 332.
(143) Ditto, No 9.
(144) Ditto, No 10.
(145) HIGHEST Grant [gramota] of 13 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 11, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(146) Ditto, No 12.
(147) HIGHEST Grant of 30 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 13, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(148) HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 14, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(149) HIGHEST Grant of 30 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 15, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(150) HIGHEST Grant of 15 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 16, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(151) HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 17, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(152) HIGHEST Grant of 15 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 18, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(153) HIGHEST Grant of 25 April 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 19, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(154) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 20, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(155) Ditto, No 21.
(156) Ditto, No 22.
(157) HIGHEST Grant of 3 July 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 23, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(158) HIGHEST Grant of 19 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 24, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(159) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 25, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(160) Ditto, No 26.
(161) HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 27, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(162) HIGHEST Grant of 20 November 1797; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 28, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(163) HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 29, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(164) HIGHEST Grant of 7 December 1797; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 30, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(165) HIGHEST Grant of 1 February 1799; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 31, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(166) HIGHEST Grant of 1 February 1799; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 32, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(167) HIGHEST Grant of 15 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 33, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(168) HIGHEST Grant of 3 May 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 34, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(169) HIGHEST Grant of 30 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 35, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(170) HIGHEST Grant of 1 February 1799; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 36, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(171) HIGHEST Grant of 15 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 37, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(172) HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 38, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(173) HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 39, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(174) HIGHEST Grant of 20 November 1797; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 40, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(175) HIGHEST Grant of 15 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 41, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(176) HIGHEST Grant of 15 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 42, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(177) HIGHEST Grant of 1 February 1799, No 113; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 43, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(178) HIGHEST Grant of 15 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 44, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142..
(179) HIGHEST Grant of 15 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 45, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(180) HIGHEST Grant of 30 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 46, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(181) Ditto, No 47.
(182) HIGHEST Grant of 6 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 48, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(183) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 59, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(184) Ditto, No 50.
(185) HIGHEST Grant of 5 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 51, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(186) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 52, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(187) Ditto, No 53.
(188) HIGHEST Grant of 2 July 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 54, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(189) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799, No 63; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 55, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(190) HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 56, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(191) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799, No 64; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 57, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(192) HIGHEST Grant of 30 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 58, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(193) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 59, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(194) HIGHEST Grant of 15 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 60, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(195) HIGHEST Grant of 30 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 61, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(196) HIGHEST Grant of 13 August 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 62, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(197) HIGHEST Grant of 30 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 63, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(198) HIGHEST Grant of 8 March 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 64, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(199) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 65, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(200) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 68, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(201) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 67, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(202) HIGHEST Grant of 5 April 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 69, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(203) HIGHEST Grant of 21 August 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 69, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(204) HIGHEST Grant of 10 August 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 70, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(205) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 71, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(206) HIGHEST Grant of 31 August 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 72, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(207) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799, No 65; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 73, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(208) HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 74, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(209) HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 75, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(210) HIGHEST Grant of 5 July 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 76, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(211) HIGHEST Grant of 9 January 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 77, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(212) HIGHEST Grant of 9 January 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 78, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(213) HIGHEST Grant of 9 January 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 79, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(214) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1798, No 67; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 80, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(215) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799, No 66; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 81, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(216) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 82, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(217) HIGHEST Grant of 22 February 1799, No 165; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 83, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(218) HIGHEST Grant of 22 February 1799, No 167; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 84, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(219) HIGHEST Grant of 22 February 1799, No 170; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 85, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(220) HIGHEST Grant of 22 February 1799, No 168; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 86, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(221) HIGHEST Grant of 22 February 1799, No 166; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 87, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(222) HIGHEST Grant of 22 February 1799, No 169; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 88, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(223) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 89, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(224) Ditto, No 94.
(225) HIGHEST Grant of 25 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 102, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(226) HIGHEST Grant of 5 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 103, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(227) HIGHEST Grant of 13 June 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 109, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(228) HIGHEST Grant of 13 June 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 108, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(229) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 967; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 95, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(230) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 138, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(231) HIGHEST Grant of 31 August 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 140, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(232) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1798, No 522; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 154, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(233) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 973; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 115, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(234) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1799, No 524; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 148, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(235) HIGHEST Grant of 19 November 1798, No 524; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 121, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(236) HIGHEST Grant of 11 May 1799, No 344; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 135, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(237) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 524; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 148, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(238) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 969; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 111, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(239) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1799, No 525; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 147, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(240) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 90, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(241) HIGHEST Grant of 13 June 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 92, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(242) HIGHEST Grant of 19 November 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 122, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(243) HIGHEST Grant of 11 May 1799, No 347; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 134, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(244) HIGHEST Grant of 11 May 1798, No 348; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 133, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(245) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1799, No 518; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 149, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(246) HIGHEST Grant of 11 May 1799, No 346; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 136, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(247) HIGHEST Grant of 11 May 1799, No 342; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 137, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(248) HIGHEST Grant of 11 May 1799, No 341; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 132, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(249) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 91, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(250) HIGHEST Grant of 25 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 104, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(251) HIGHEST Grant of 25 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 105, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(252) HIGHEST Grant of 25 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 106, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(253) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 971; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 113, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(254) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 970; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 112, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(255) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 978; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 124, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(256) HIGHEST Grant of 22 April 1799, No 311; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 100, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(257) HIGHEST Grant of 19 July 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 99, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(258) HIGHEST Grant of 13 June 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 97, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(259) HIGHEST Grant of 11 May 1799, No 343; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 101, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142
(260) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 98, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142
(261) HIGHEST Grant of 4 May 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 93, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(262) HIGHEST Grant of 7 December 1797; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 96, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(263) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 979; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 125, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(264) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 983; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 130, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(265) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 980; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 126, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(266) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 932; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 129, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(267) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 981; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 127, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(268) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 989; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 146, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(269) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 984; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 141, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(270) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 985; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 142, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(271) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 986; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 143, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(272) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 987; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 144, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142
(273) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 988; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 145, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(274) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 974; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 116, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(275) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 972; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 114, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(276) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 975; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 118, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(277) HIGHEST Grant of 25 October 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 117, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(278) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 976; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 119, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(279) HIGHEST Grant of 12 August 1799, No 977; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 120, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(280) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1799, No 523; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 150, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(281) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1799, No 519; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 151, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(282) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1799, No 521; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 152, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(283) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1799, No 520; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 153, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(284) HIGHEST Grant of 11 May 1799, No 345; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 131, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(285) HIGHEST Grant of 30 July 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 139, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(286) HIGHEST Grant of 9 January 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 107, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(287) HIGHEST Grant of 10 January 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 128, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(288) HIGHEST Grant of 19 January 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 123, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(289) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1799, No 526; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 155, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(290) Actual flags preserved in various arsenals, including the St.-Petersburg Arsenal, and drawings of these flags located in THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library in porfolio No 169.
(291) Ditto.
(292) Ditto.
(293) Ditto.
(294) Ditto.
(295) Ditto.
(296) The same sources as cited in Notes 290-295, and a HIGHEST Grant of 30 March 1800, No 225.
(297) HIGHEST Grant of 26 December 1800, No 691.
(298) HIGHEST Grant of 6 March 1800, No 162.
(299) HIGHEST Grant of 5 August 1800, No 457.
(300) HIGHEST Grant of 28 February 1800, No 139.
(301) HIGHEST Grant of 17 March 1800, No 189.
(302) HIGHEST Grant of 30 August 1800, No 495.
(303) HIGHEST Grant of 26 December 1800, No 692.
(304) HIGHEST Grant of 17 December 1800, No 683.
(305) HIGHEST Grant of 1 October 1800, No 551.
(306) HIGHEST Grant of 1 October 1800, No 551.
(307) HIGHEST Grant of 21 June 1800, No 362.
(308) HIGHEST Grant of 5 August 1800, No 458.
(309) HIGHESTGrant of 30 August 1800, No 494.
(310) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1800, No 353.
(311) HIGHEST Grant of 21 July 1800, No 479.
(312) HIGHEST Grant of 21 July 1800, No 480.
(313) HIGHEST Grant of 21 July 1800, No 481.
(314) HIGHEST Grant of 5 July 1800, No 396.
(315) HIGHEST Grant of 5 July 1800, No 397.
(316) For flags of the Senate Regiment see drawings from 1800 located in THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library in porfolio No 169, and for flags of Marklovskii’s Regiment see the Highest Grant of 26 May 1800, No 351.
(317) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1800, No 352.
(318) Actual flags preserved in arsenals.
(319) Ditto.
(320) Ditto.
(321) Ditto.
(322) Ditto.
(323) Ditto.
(324) Actual standards preserved in various arsenals, including the St.-Petersburg Arsenal, and in the regiments themselves, and drawings of cuirassier standards located in THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library in porfolio No 332.
(325) HIGHEST Grant of 25 June 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 162, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(326) HIGHEST Grant of 20 June 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 163, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(327) HIGHEST Grant of 23 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 164, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(328) HIGHEST Grant of 9 January 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 165, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(329) HIGHEST Grant of 23 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 166, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(330) HIGHEST Grant of 26 February 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 167, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(331) HIGHEST Grant of 26 February 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 168, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(332) HIGHEST Grant of 26 February 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 169, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(333) HIGHEST Grant of 23 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 170, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(334) HIGHEST Grant of 26 February 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 171, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(335) HIGHEST Grant of 9 January 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 172, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(336) HIGHEST Grant of 23 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 173, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(337) HIGHEST Grant of 10 February 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 174, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(338) HIGHEST Grant of 23 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 175, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(339) HIGHEST Grant of 11 February 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 176, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(340) HIGHEST Grant of 11 February 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 177, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(341) HIGHEST Grant of 199 July 1799, No 925; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 196, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(342) HIGHEST Grant of 19 July 1799, No 923; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 197, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(343) HIGHEST Grant of 19 July 1799, No 924; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 198, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(344) Actual standards preserved in various arsenals, including the St.-Petersburg Arsenal, and in the regiments themselves, and drawings of dragoon standards located in THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library in porfolio No 332.
(345) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799, No 60; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 178, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(346) HIGHEST Grant of 7 December 1797; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 179, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(347) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1798, No 59; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 180, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(348) HIGHEST Grant of 6 September 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 181, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(349) HIGHEST Grant of 26 March 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 182, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(350) HIGHEST Grant of 25 April 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 183, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(351) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799, No 58; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 184, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(352) HIGHEST Grant of 20 November 1797; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 185, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(353) HIGHEST Grant of 20 November 1797; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 186, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(354) HIGHEST Grant of 20 November 1797; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 187, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(355) HIGHEST Grant of 4 May 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 188, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(356) HIGHEST Grant of 21 January 1799, No 61; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 189, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(357) HIGHEST Grant of 3 May 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 190, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(358) HIGHEST Grant of 3 May 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 191, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(359) HIGHEST Grant of 26 February 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 192, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(360) HIGHEST Grant of 25 June 1798; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 193, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(361) HIGHEST Grant of 19 July 1799, No 927; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 199, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(362) HIGHEST Grant of 19 July 1799, No 926; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 200, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(363) Actual standards preserved in arsenals, and some in the regiments themselves.
(364) HIGHEST Grant of 26 May 1800, No 350.
(365) HIGHEST Grant of 16 June 1800, No 356.
(366) HIGHEST Grant of 22 June 1800, No 367.
(367) Actual standards preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal, and drawings located in THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library in books No 158 and No 159.
(368) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 1; this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and the flags themselves preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(369) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 3; this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and the flags themselves preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(370) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 5; this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and the flags themselves preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(371) Statements by contemporaries and actual flags preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(372) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 2; and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and the flags themselves preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(373) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 4; this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and the flags themselves preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(374) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 6; this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and the flags themselves preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(375) Table of flags from 1800, locatedin THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library in portfolio No 169, and flags prepared but never used, preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(376) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 160; this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and a standard itself preserved in HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY’s Own Arsenal in the Anichkov Palace.
(377) Actual standards preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(378) The poles of these standards, with St.-George crosses and ribbons from 1813 hanging on them, are preserved in HER MAJESTY’s Cavalier Guards Regiment. The cloth field, however, has been destroyed by time and their drawings are nowhere to be found.
(379) Drawings located in THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library, catalogued under No 159.
(380) Actual standards preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(381) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 161, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(382) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 203; this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and actual flags preserved in HIS IMPERIAL HIGHNESS GRAND DUKE MICHAEL PAVLOVICH’s Own Arsenal.
(383) HIGHESTGrant of 6 June 1799, No 500. However, it is highly probable that this grant was given for the preceding flags.
(384) Information received from the 1st Cadet Corps; Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 7, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(385) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 201; this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142; a drawing sent from the Ural Host, and a HIGHESTGrant of 19 April 1798.
(386) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos. 204 and 205; these same numbers in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and a HIGHESTGrant of 10 August 1798.
(385) In the Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No. 202, it is written in regard to the Leib-Ural Sotnia’s flags: “Raspberry flag. On it a white cross. From the number of Preobrazhenskii flags personally presented by HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY on 4 January 1799.” In these words is a clear contradiction, since the raspberry flags of the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment were presented later, on 6 January 1799, and had in their corners gold wreathes with the inscription “Blagodat’.” In a table of flags and standards compiled by Prince Dolgorukov himself for the Chronicle citee above and located in THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library, catalogued under No 332, the Leib-Ural flag is depicted without monograms or inscriptions. With this in mind, from what Prince Dolgorukov presents it can only be concluded that the Leib-Ural Sotnia’s flag was taken from that number being prepared for the Life-Guards Preobrazhenskii Regiment and which did not yet have the afore-mentioned monograms and insriptions.
(386) Drawing of flags sent from the Don Host, and a HIGHESTGrant of 15 February 1800, No 93.
(389) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, Nos. 206 and 207; these same numbers in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and actual flags of the Lithuanian-Tatar Regiment preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal, and a HIGHEST Grant of 15 September 1798.
(390) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 156, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(391) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 157, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(392) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 158, and this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142.
(393) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 194, and this same number in the book with drawings of uniforms, flags, and standards located in THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library, catalogued under No 177.
(394) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 195, and this same number in the book with drawings of uniforms, flags, and standards located in THE SOVEREIGN EMPEROR’s Own Library, catalogued under No 177.
(395) HIGHEST Grant of 16 February 1800, No 96. In this grant it was stated that the flag was being awarded for distinction shown by the Duke de Bourbon’s Regiment at Constance, while a report from Genealissimus Prince Suvorov in Lindau to EMPEROR PAUL I dated 9/20 October 1799 said, “The Prince de Condé notifies me that on 27 September/8 October he was attacked by the French at Costnits, where he battled for seven hours against an enemy twice his number, but in the end was forced to retire after losing about 200 men killed, about 50 missing, and 4 officers. His wounded numbered about 500. The enemy lost over 300 men killed and 30 privates and 2 officers taken prisoner, and a flag was captured.”
(396) Chronicle of the Russian Imperial Army, compiled by Prince Dolgorukov, No 159; this same number in the drawings cited above in Note 142, and actual flags preserved in the St.-Petersburg Arsenal.
(397) PSZ, Vol. XXIV, pg. 5, No 17,547.
(398) PSZ, Vol. XXV, pg. 551, No 18,848.
(399) PSZ, Vol. XXVI, pg. 338, No 19,594.
(400) HIGHEST Order of 16 June 1799 and a list of distinctions held by the forces, compiled in the Inspection Department of the War Ministry.
(401) The list cited in the above note.
(402) Journal of the Riga [sic, should be Ryazhsk, i.e. Rizhskii misprinted for Ryazhskii – M.C.] Infantry Regiment, signed by its Chef, Lieut.-Gen. Graf Langeron, presented to the State Military Collegium in a report dated 24 August 1824, No 514.

 

END OF NOTES TO VOLUME NINE.